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slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Bought a new house a couple of months ago with a triple attached garage. It has a pull through 3rd bay with back yard access which is going to be super handy.

In process of pouring a 30' long pad (20x30) behind that bay. My concrete contractor wanted to do it in 2 stages, in no small part because of limited access his crew is moving the concrete by hand with wheelbarrow.

1st half got finished last night. Started to pour at about 17:00 (wanted to wait for the direct sun to be gone), finished pouring at about 19:00, wrapped up with the finishing about an hour after that. It's basic with a broom finish. Now that I see it taking shape, I'm even more sure this was a good move. 6" thick at the house edge, about 5" on the slab edge, and between 4.5-5 for the bulk of the slab. It'll be mostly used as a patio with maybe the rare vehicle parked on it every now and then so it'll be ample for that. The biggest load it will probably have on it is going to be when I do my landscaping yet this summer which will require a skidsteer, so I want to wait about 3-4 weeks until it's about 90% before I even consider it.

Just finished throwing some water on it and will be continuing to do so for the next couple days.

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slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Garage2Roadtrip posted:

Are you going to throw a fence or something around that basement window? I feel like I would walk out the door and promptly fall into that hole.
You know it never even crossed my mind. It's a bit of an illusion, it's probably over 6' away from the door and it swings in but it's not an insane idea. I'll probably live with it for a while. If I see it as a genuine risk, I'll figure something out. I've never had a house with Wells before (and my basement has a 9.5' ceiling) so they and any hazards the bring are new to me.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


That is a spare bedroom so we can't really cover it for light and fire escape reasons, but if need be I will probably design some sort of decorative rail or something.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


That might look a little odd I think with the window being half exposed above grade. I think if a guy went with a decorative railing or something like some 2-3' flower pots or something might be an option.

Either way, I'll see if it's an issue or not. It's just my wife and I (no kids or anything) so the risk is small, BUT since it was brought up I could see it in a worst case like walking by in the middle of a black as hell night drunk and forgetting about it or something.

I do think it was wise of you guys to mention it, like I said I never considered it.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


goon in a weeping tile

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


My old garage was 24' wide. We had a legacy, Tacoma, and some 18" deep shelves on one side so not exactly jam packed. It will be tight and awkward with 2 vehicles in it with a post lift permanently installed but you could do it. If you don't have shelves on either side it would help.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


FatCow posted:

I should have been clearer. This is only for one car.
So you're only using the whole garage as a 1 car garage? No problem if that's the case. Using it as a 2 car garage with the lift in one bay would be a little tight.

BigPaddy posted:

Just looked at that and they seem cool if you have to remove it after you are done. Maybe a bit pricy but if you have limited space it is a good option.

I have a Quickjack and it's pretty trick. Obviously cant get the height a true post lift can but it's high enough to do anything I want to do, including dropping transmissions, motors, etc. It's a little bulky but portable.

https://www.quickjack.com/car-lift-...e-car-lift.html

slidebite fucked around with this message at 13:23 on Jul 18, 2017

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Also, took the forms off and saw cut the slab. Pretty much done now! Pretty stoked to have this completed, I can't wait for another 3 weeks so I can get the pad to 90%+ set so I can drive the skidsteer on this thing and get rocking on the rest of the landscaping.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


BigPaddy posted:

Allows for expansion due to temp without cracking, as well as allowing movement for the slab settling into the ground.

And if a crack were to happen it would stop at the cut. They also like to cut them at stress risers like inside corners (for example, the corner of that window box) where a crack would be likely to form.

slidebite fucked around with this message at 18:38 on Jul 19, 2017

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Not sure if this is the best place to ask, but any recommendations for getting an oil stain out of concrete? My movers truck had an oil leak and didn't notice it until after they left and it dripped on the new, unsealed in any way driveway. Am I screwed? I heard someone say dumping copious amounts of solvent (IE: Gas) works, but I don't think dumping a massive amount of gas on it is a great idea.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Yeah, as ^^ it depends.

When we sold our last house, one of the people making an offer made it contingent on the ability to build a detached 2 car garage in the back yard. We gave them a copy of the RPR and they went to the city permit people who gave them an answer in minutes that they could.

Seat Safety Switch posted:

The Oil Lift stuff that they have at Can Tire has done really well for me in lifting oil stains from my ancient driveway, but so has Spray Nine.
Pretty sure I have some spray 9, but if not I'll pick some of that poo poo up. Thanks!

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Go as big as your budget and laws allow. You'll never kick yourself for having too big a garage, but you certainly will for having one too small. It's also a tremendous bonus years from now if you sell. A garage seems nice and roomy when it's empty, but when you start putting your poo poo in it you'll wish you were larger. Consider a triple, even if you only park 2 cars in it (assuming you're able to).

Even if you're not going to heat the garage right away (assuming you live somewhere where heat is something you would want), consider running the infrastructure needed for it if it's in your budget. Assuming you have gas, maybe run a power outlet, gas stub, low voltage wires and install an exhaust vent where you think you'd want to put a heater.

When I was lift shopping, iirc 4.25"+ @ 3000psi reinforced concrete seemed to be the standard. Anything thicker/better all the better. Most garage pads/driveways as a matter of standard are about 5"+ where I live. If you have your eye on a certain lift, download the manual and read the installation instructions. Consider your ceiling heights if you plan to put in a lift. If you go nice and high you can even consider installing some additional storage racks at roof height for those big things you rarely use.. or heck I've seen some people even do a small mezzanine which is nice.

A floor drain would kick all sorts of rear end and I would highly recommend one if you can, but I haven't lived in a municipality that would actually allow one in a new home garage build for many years now.

Whatever you do, don't cheap out on the number of standard 115V wall outlets. Try and have one every 6 feet or so with extra near the workbench. Nothing worse than needing an extension cord in your own garage. Don't forget outside outlets either. Also running some cables for a security system/cameras or something isn't crazy before it gets buttoned up. Consider a 230V outlet if you can for a future welder or big compressor. If you are putting in garage door openers, make sure you have power outlets on the ceiling near where the opener unit goes and runs the cables for the photo sensors.

Also, LIGHTS LIGHTS. Standard garage lighting is abysmal, like 2 screw in bulbs. You'll probably want at least 4x T8 per parking "bay" plus something dedicated over your workbench. The more the better, make your neighbours think you have a grow op in the garage. I'm personally not a huge window person for my garages. I see them as a security risk and insulation inefficiency.

slidebite fucked around with this message at 16:10 on Sep 8, 2017

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


I would say $20K-$40K as a total spitball wouldn't be insane for a good size stand-alone, keeping in mind it could be done on the low side if you do most of the work (including concrete and prep - that's $$$) but also be much, much higher if you go big and contract out everything. Not sure about concrete and trade prices where you live obviously.
e: typo

slidebite fucked around with this message at 17:07 on Sep 8, 2017

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


How difficult is it to install a garage door opener? My builder didn't bother putting one on the pull-thru of the 3rd bay, but he did completely wire/rough everything in before he buttoned up the walls. So I've got cables for the photo-eyes, a cable for the wall switch with everything ending up on the ceiling near a power outlet. I wasn't going to bother but there are some sales on right now so I'm thinking of it.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Nah, none of the mounting stuff/hardware is there, just the cables for controls/eyes and power. I assume these door kits come with all that stuff for mounting though?

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Yeah, the door is already installed. It's just the opener that I need to do. 100% agree though, if it wasn't, well, gently caress that.

The ceiling is buttoned up, but I don't think I'll have a trouble finding a truss to attach the supports to. I'll just keep my eyes open for a cheapo opener on sale to attach to it.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


That is kind of neat, it's sort of like a little shaft mounted gearbox. I doubt I'll go anything like that as the door is rarely used, in fact I'm not even sure I'll get one now as I'll probably only use it a handful of times a year. The passthru bay was incredibly handy with doing the yard in the new house, afterwards I'm not so sure. But if I find a cheap opener for $100 or so I probably will just for the sake of completing it.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Industrial metal shelves are the way to go, but I lucked out as I got a few when my shop moved location. They cost a pretty penny to buy new. I'd probably just keep my eyes open on craigs/kijiji.

I went to the dump a couple weeks ago to turf my old BBQ and they directed me to the scrap steel area to unload it. It was sad because there was about 12 shop shelves, complete and seemingly in excellent shape just sitting there in the scrap pile. I would have taken them but the dump has a strict no removal policy.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


heh, that would be tough with a whole vehicle scale, including trailer. I think it's about 40' long

They should have a free-cycle area though, that kind of thing is such a waste. I remember as a kid going to the dump with my brother and some guy was rolling an old Norton (or something) British military bike out of the back of his truck telling my brother "he was loving sick and tired of working on it"
I don't doubt that he was... but I'm sure someone would have taken it.

e: Oh you mean dumping the sand

slidebite fucked around with this message at 19:05 on Sep 18, 2017

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


My in laws live in a place with no water infrastructure and their water is all rainwater via cistern storage. Only treatment they have is putting in a couple guppies or something (the local government supplies) so they eat any bug larvae. The water is super soft and tastes fine.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


I think as your illustration would be fine, especially if thats the rear. Your roofers will thank you as well.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


So I noticed right in the middle of my driveway it looks like a piece of the aggregate that was close to the surface cracked, causing a spall about 2" or so in diameter, probably about 1/8-1/4" deep. Anyone recommend a decent product for a small patch? Broom finish there if it makes a difference.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Those old Panasonic plasmas were great tvs.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Very nice and jealous! Out of curiosity, do you have a drain set up for that?

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


How big is that? Looks about 25x25ish?

Is that a floor drain I see in the middle? If so, jealous. Not allowed here.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


A water hose reel is not something you want to cheap out on considering if it springs a good leak you could be having a bad day. Drop the money and go quality. Reelcraft makes good stuff.

I am curious to find out what you do for lighting attached to the openers. Someone told me LEDs for some reason interfere with the signal reception for the opener and mine are lovely CFLs which, are better than nothing, but not great.

My old house I had something like 8 x 2 bulb T8 fixtures and I miss it so much. I'll probably go LED if I upgrade this house though.

slidebite fucked around with this message at 20:02 on Feb 4, 2019

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


I have the 5000slx and quite like it. It's perfect for the 996. Biggest issues I have with it are the hoses are cheap, not as flexible as I would like and they use a dog's breakfast mix of JIC and NPT threads. NPT has no business on an end user assembled hydraulic system because by definition they need sealing tape (a no-no in hydraulics) and can easily leak. I'm going to build up some proper spaghetti hoses out of some quality hose at work for mine. It's a little heavier than I would like and yes, it's portable, but definitely clunky and not light. It would have been nice if it made more use of aluminum if possible.

That said, don't get me wrong, I quite like it.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Oh no, it would be very simple. Any hose shop that makes hydraulic hoses would almost certainly be able to do it from stock with literally 15 minutes of work and you'd have the ability to make them almost any length you want... so you could in theory have the powerpak on the completely opposite end of the shop if you had long enough hoses.

Biggest issue, going from memory, is the parts that are NPT are, well, always going to be NPT so you really can't get away from it now since that's how they build them. You are stuck either using NPT fittings or adapters now. It's really not the end of the world to be fair, it's just a pitty. NPT is inferior by almost any metric. Since it seals on the threads you have to use sealant or tape which is not good on a hydraulic system because if you get any bits on the oil it doesn't play well with the valving or pumps. Now, in all reality it's not a super precision servo system so short of doing something really dumb you're probably not going to ruin it, but it's just a poor design and far more prone to installation problems and leaks. It wouldn't have even cost them more since in industry JIC and NPT threads literally cost the same for most things.

That said, the supplied hoses are hardwall springy pieces of poo poo aren't helping matters and probably my biggest pet peeve. Since there are quick disconnects the hoses will often have residual pressure in them which doesn't really help either.

You realize you're giving me a kick in the rear end to actually get this done right and see how much of a difference it makes? LOL.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


angryrobots posted:

This is absolutely the case. My property had a 40x60 metal building and there was one picture, zoomed in from I'm guessing the house cause they couldn't be arsed to walk over there. Listing had lots of pictures of the terrible dated and worn house interior which was a foreclosure and looked it. Our gain, fortunately.
That's interesting. Up here in the frozen north a garage of note s often mentioned before even talking about the house.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Realtors have way more options for searching than us plebes for MLS.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


A small, semi modern house with anything larger than a double (actuality a glorified single) garage is a proverbial unicorn in our area at least. When we were shopping I wanted a triple and that automatically put us into an "upper echelon" of home sizes/areas that we didn't necessarily want.

End of the day, we ended up with about as small of a house as we reasonably could with a triple, but it's still about 300 sq/ft larger than our old house which was already larger than we needed for just the two of us.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Ours have always been Chamberlain made and very reliable, but I strongly recommend the extra small bit of $$ for belt driven. Especially if you have living space above it. Much less vibration and quieter than roller chain. My office is above our garage and I don't even hear/feel it 75% of the time.

Very common now, but make sure you get the kind that has the programming and stuff on the wall mount buttons. Otherwise you need to be on a ladder if you need to reprogram a controller. Doesn't really happen terribly often, but it's handy having it all at ground level.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Mr. Powers posted:

Is there a standard dimension for "car with room to move around it"? Will be a good reference to have when I'm looking at listings. someone earlier said they had asked for 1k sqft, but I guess I have no mental image for size for that.
Here is my garage, it's 30'x24.5'

I can pretty comfortably park 3 vehicles (including a full size truck) in it. and have a full row of 18" deep shelves on a side.

The stairs at the front of the garage take up room for sure, but on the side without any I can quite easily park my not-small bike. Otherside is where I have my workbench.

Excuse the mess.




slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


When I was looking at hobby lifts, most seemed to need a minimum 4" slab of concrete. Where I live 5"+ is pretty much the standard floor for garages. Of course, YMMV as not all manufacturers will be exactly the same especially once capacities come into play.

Like was mentioned, most manufacturers have their manuals online so you can find specifically what the model you are interested in requires.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


You guys have recommendations for a really strong sealant/caulk that can be used over a gap in concrete and stands up to weathering and hot/cold cycles?

I've got about a 3/16-1/4" gap between my sidewalk and driveway and I'd like water to be able to flow over. I tried some stuff 2 years ago but just isn't weathering worth a darn.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


The local guys recommended that stuff too. Thanks

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Yes. Yes they are. My landscaping would have been a crazy amount of labour unless I had a pull through since I had zero other access other than a gate or man door to my backyard.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Suburban Dad posted:

So contractor has been selected, he's coming by today for deposit to start drawings and all that. Plan is to do a 12' wide bay that's the depth of the house (35'), assuming the city is ok with the massive depth/sq footage. Widening by another 3' was another $4500 or so so we'll probably keep it at 12' wide. Plan is to have another parking bay with storage in the back for tools and other crap that our tiny basement won't cover. It'll basically look like what Lloyd drew up, with the roof starting at the base of the 2nd story windows for maximum height. Here's the list of what he's quoting so far.

-Supply final design and blueprints for proposed garage
-Break out walkway next to existing garage and slab in front of new garage area and haul
-Dig and pour 12"x 42" footings for 12'x 35' attached garage
-Haul dirt
-Install (1) layer of block on footings
-Form new garage floor and approx.12'x 20' apron in front
-Install crushed gravel base and tamp
-Pour new 4" floor and apron with 6 bag mix
-Build 12'x 35' attached garage with shed roof
-Take down brick on east side of garage
-Match wall height of existing garage
-12" overhangs on eave and front gable
-Frame for 8'x 7' overhead door
-Cut in archway to existing garage
-Install 36" service door on rear wall of addition
-Install shingles to match house
-Install brick in front wall of garage up to eave using leftover brick
-Install vinyl soffit on overhangs; aluminum trim on rakes, eaves and doors
-Install Mastic Board & Batten vertical siding on walls and gables
-Install gutters and downspouts
-Upgrade electrical service to 30 circuit, 100 amp panel
-Run 60 amp panel to garage with basic wiring package
-Install 8'x 7' overhead door with opener to match existing as closely as possible

Anything else I should be thinking about or considering right now? Concrete 4" thick should be good for a lift in the future (?), but I'll check on ceiling height since I don't know what the trusses will look like with a "shed" style roof. Honestly a max jack is probably best case scenario at this point I'd guess.

I'm going to talk to him about insulating and drywall and expand on what the electrical "package" means. Obviously need to know what's planned there before drywall. Currently we have a big window on the exterior side of the existing garage that we're planning on turning into a big opening (no door planned) to the new garage, so makes sense to insulate it even though there's not going to be any HVAC to either garage. Also window on the room behind existing garage will be turned into a door most likely for another access point from inside the house.
4" @ 3000 PSI is pretty much the minimum for a lift. Not sure what "6 bag mix" is. If you are planing on a lift, an extra inch or so of thickness would not be a bad idea and get that ceiling as high as you reasonably can. RE: The electrical, if they wire it make sure you have outlets every 6-8' and lights. Lots of lights. Not sure where you live, but heat isn't important?

And yeah, spray foam is the bees knees. That sets apart the spec/mass builders in my area from the craftsman builders. They'll use batt insulation in the walls but spray in all the crawl spaces/inside the soffits/draft/tough areas.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Unifinished basements are severely underrated. Even a finished basement, the best thing a guy can do is leave a somewhat significant portion unfinished for ~stuff~

tangy yet delightful posted:

I think you can just cut the slab later and pour deeper footings for a lift if needed (depending on the lift). May not be worth a thicker or higher PSI full slab pour. Not sure on the price TBH.
I'm sure you could, but gently caress that. Capital "F"

Cutting/coring a slab, digging/coring, pouring a foot or even a screw pile, new pour on top. Ugh. Just doing an extra inch on the build is the time to do it.

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slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Noice. Good heights in basements make a huge difference. Our house has a raised basement as well (9.5' ceilings finished) and makes a huge difference in "feel"

Nothing worse than having to duck to go under a beam of a duct. Or, having a few adult bevs and forgetting that they are there!

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