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Gasmask
Apr 27, 2003

And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee

Sorry mate. Itís a difficult time.

Stay safe

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Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






The Bosch router guide bushing system is kind of a clunky, over-complicated, Teutonic pain in the rear end, but it does (eventually) work.

schmug
May 20, 2007



Jaded Burnout posted:


The ID of the supplied bushing is 1mm smaller than the OD of the cutter.



So, I guess I need to buy another guide bushing.

Are you dovetailing your stringers?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




schmug posted:

Are you dovetailing your stringers?

Not literally, but cutting a dovetail route for the parts to fit into, yes. This is apparently how it's done, google "stair trenching bit" or "stair housing cutter" and you'll see them.

The book says to do it this way, and even the cheap temp stairs are cut this way, though it can be done with a straight cutter but with more likelihood of squeaks.

schmug
May 20, 2007



Jaded Burnout posted:

Not literally, but cutting a dovetail route for the parts to fit into, yes. This is apparently how it's done, google "stair trenching bit" or "stair housing cutter" and you'll see them.

The book says to do it this way, and even the cheap temp stairs are cut this way, though it can be done with a straight cutter but with more likelihood of squeaks.

Interesting. That isn't a super common over here - especially not with a dovetail. I had assumed you were cutting "standard" stringers and then nailing down treads.



So it looks like you just dovetail the grooves? Like I said, interesting... learn something new and all that lol

schmug fucked around with this message at 21:08 on Mar 29, 2020

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




So. 30mm guide bushing arrived. My (one, small, achievable) goal for today was to get the bit and bushing installed and set to depth.

I need 24mm of projection from the base of the machine to get the DoC that I want, 12mm jig + 12mm cut.

Instead I get about 16mm.



With the bushing installed it's even worse.




The bit is already installed at the bit manufacturer's maximum amount of stick out, though the Bosch manual is OK with more, but I'd also need to cut down the depth of the guide; it's frankly ridiculous.

Not only that, but these are the only guides for sale, and they're supposed to be slot-in compatible between the pro and consumer models. They are not. Or at least some of the locking flanges will need cutting back to fit on the consumer model, so either they're not cross-compatible or the official bosch parts don't fit either product line.

I'm annoyed, really. It's nobody's fault, but I've paid more than half the cost of the router in parts now and I'm still no closer to getting the job done. I can cut away at things and extend the bit out beyond spec, but it's already a consumer machine and I'm wary of doing that. I'm also not willing to invest any more money in this unit (not that there's anything I could buy to fix this anyway); that would be head deep in the sunk cost fallacy.

My options might be to rent a pro unit or buy one. The reason I got a consumer one in the first place is the jump between "good for a consumer unit" and "good for a pro unit" is like £500, so I'd have to do a lot of research and shopping around to find an appropriate half-inch unit. I'll still have to buy another router bit, regardless.

I'm also seriously considering doing it by hand.

schmug posted:

So it looks like you just dovetail the grooves? Like I said, interesting... learn something new and all that lol

Yeah, so the way the book tells it, the undercut from the dovetail cutter provides a cleaner join between the two pieces, and allows wedges to seat better with less squeaking.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




I have.. .. purchased more equipment.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



Investment in tools is never a loss.

Tomarse
Mar 7, 2001

Grr

I had similar issues to you. I bought an affordable router to cut my kitchen worktop and it was a 1/4 one and it turned out that getting the bits I needed to work with my worktop and the cutting jig was a proper PITA (I was also using a guide bushing). I wish I'd bought a 1/2 one instead. They start at about £100. The extra money would have been worth the hassle I have every time I want to get a special router bit.

In my case I over-extended the 1/4 router bit to get more depth and was also able to flip my worktop over and cut it from both sides. I can report that overextending the bit went OK but I didn't enjoy doing it.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




I'll probably try and sell the quarter inch one, or something. Or turn it into a router table.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Jaded Burnout posted:

I'll probably try and sell the quarter inch one, or something. Or turn it into a router table.
You can never have too many routers, I promise. Keeping a small one setup with a small round over bit to break edges will save you many splinters.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

You can never have too many routers, I promise. Keeping a small one setup with a small round over bit to break edges will save you many splinters.

Only issue being it's not any physically smaller, just takes a smaller shank.

wooger
Apr 16, 2005

YOU RESENT?

Jaded Burnout posted:

Only issue being it's not any physically smaller, just takes a smaller shank.

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

You can never have too many routers, I promise. Keeping a small one setup with a small round over bit to break edges will save you many splinters.

Maybe if you have a barn out back for woodshopping.

Iíd be comparing the opportunity cost of having my house full of massive machinery about now.

Tomarse
Mar 7, 2001

Grr

Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

You can never have too many routers, I promise. Keeping a small one setup with a small round over bit to break edges will save you many splinters.

So is this like how people working with metal have multiple angle grinders? (I currently have 3 each with different types of disc on). I will add that to the list of mental justifications when I eventually buy the 1/2 router that is on my shopping list!

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Tomarse posted:

So is this like how people working with metal have multiple angle grinders? (I currently have 3 each with different types of disc on). I will add that to the list of mental justifications when I eventually buy the 1/2 router that is on my shopping list!

I'll let you know how the Trend one I just bought is.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




I wanted to find something I could get done today, and one of the things bothering me is still not having a door on the bathroom. This is because the tile needs trimming back and I've never been in the mood to completely loving trash the place by using my oscillating saw on it and chucking fine tile dust everywhere.

So instead I did it by hand with an adjustable wrench.






The plan was to take the larger pieces out and snap them on the bench, then have the tiler put them back up and regrout, but depending on the final height of the architrave I may not have to, so I'll set them aside for now.

Next up is to put together a new door lining and fit that.

Twenty Four
Dec 21, 2008

HAIKOOLIGAN

Jaded Burnout posted:

I wanted to find something I could get done today, and one of the things bothering me is still not having a door on the bathroom.

I like that my joke answer to "which way should my bathroom door swing" being "don't put a door on your bathroom so guests will be uncomfortable" turned out to be at least temporarily true, lol.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




While waiting for the new router to arrive, I decided to sharpen my chisels and other blades, since fitting doors requires one in good shape.

I started with my old chisel, which I used before I knew how to take care of my tools, so is pretty knocked up.




Now I don't have a grinder, so for taking out those chips I did the best I could with a file.




After that I hit it on my 400 grit steel plate to even things out a little.




And then worked my way up my fancy stones, with accompanying heavy slurry.







And then finished up on leather.




The router arrived not too long after that, and if I can fight depression/inertia I'll get that set up and tested.



Yesterday I wanted to get out in the garden with the strimmer, but turns out I've got no line for it, so while that's on order I went through and sharpened all my chisels, knives, and other blades. The process was the same as with the first chisel, except without the file and steel plate, and I did them stone by stone rather than tool by tool.



I wound up putting double bevels on them, not because of personal preference, but because I'm not accurate enough to do otherwise yet. I also unintentionally put rounds on some of the smaller tool tips.

Today I'm having a bit of a chill, but I will likely put together a doorframe or something later on.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Janky but if you're desperate you can use a couple of cable ties instead of a strimmer line.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




cakesmith handyman posted:

Janky but if you're desperate you can use a couple of cable ties instead of a strimmer line.

Nah it can wait. Just a maintenance trim, and the new line is arriving by Thursday.

Harry Potter on Ice
Nov 4, 2006
Someone on the internet doesn't like me





They may have a double bevel but drat look at that reflection! Pretty sweet, I'm going to have to get a set of stones

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Harry Potter on Ice posted:

They may have a double bevel but drat look at that reflection! Pretty sweet, I'm going to have to get a set of stones

On that one I definitely hit the whole bevel. Everything else came out on the table looking like this:



You can see that the primary bevel is still at factory grind, while there's a new sharpened secondary bevel. Again, not deliberate, that's just how it came out by feel, though apparently it's a popular approach among the cargo culting youtubers.

You can also see that the left hand side (RHS when sharpening) isn't honed as far in as the rest. This also appeared on every blade, so there's some inconsistency between my left and right hand sharpening.

No doubt they will still all do the job, though.

This set of stones plus strop cost something like £250, but I'm extremely certain you could get excellent results at half that.

I've still never properly learned how to set up my plane, though.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






I wouldn't worry about a double bevel or rounded edge. IME what matters most is how finely the cutting edge is polished, and yours look very nice. A double bevel is theoretically stronger (because it is a steeper). I mostly do it because it's alot faster to polish the tiny front part of the bevel that actually does the cutting instead of trying to get the whole damned bevel perfectly flat and shiny.

Being to take a file to a chisel is . They ought to be harder than the file, which may explain why it got so chewed up.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Being to take a file to a chisel is . They ought to be harder than the file, which may explain why it got so chewed up.

I'm no expert, but that sounds backwards to me. Why would you not want your (albeit generic white-labelled) metal files to be as hard as possible, especially compared to a wood chisel?

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Jaded Burnout posted:

I'm no expert, but that sounds backwards to me. Why would you not want your (albeit generic white-labelled) metal files to be as hard as possible, especially compared to a wood chisel?
This is my layman's and a bit of googling understanding: Files are very hard (and they make even harder specialty files, but the internet suggest a normal file is ~RC55-60) but good chisels are usually harder (RC58-61), which is why they have to be ground with an abrasive that is harder than them like tiny bits of rocks or carbide or diamonds or w/e. My guess is the same brittleness/toughness/hardness trade-off applies to files too, so there if you get them too hard they chip, but too soft and they don't cut. Files are mostly intended for cutting softer steels/cast iron or brass etc. and harder, heat treated high carbon steel gets ground (or filed before it is hardened).

I've admittedly never actually tried filing my good chisels, and maybe they are softer/files are harder than I think, but I'm not at all surprised that babby's first beater chisel is not very hard steel and files easily. Card scrapers and saws are definitely soft enough to (except the cheap ones with impulse hardened teeth) file, and a file is the right way to sharpen them. Files are quicker than stones too, so if you can cut it with a file do it- it's gonna be faster than stones-but it also probably means the thing you are sharpening isn't super hard.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

This is my layman's and a bit of googling understanding: Files are very hard (and they make even harder specialty files, but the internet suggest a normal file is ~RC55-60) but good chisels are usually harder (RC58-61), which is why they have to be ground with an abrasive that is harder than them like tiny bits of rocks or carbide or diamonds or w/e. My guess is the same brittleness/toughness/hardness trade-off applies to files too, so there if you get them too hard they chip, but too soft and they don't cut. Files are mostly intended for cutting softer steels/cast iron or brass etc. and harder, heat treated high carbon steel gets ground (or filed before it is hardened).

I've admittedly never actually tried filing my good chisels, and maybe they are softer/files are harder than I think, but I'm not at all surprised that babby's first beater chisel is not very hard steel and files easily. Card scrapers and saws are definitely soft enough to (except the cheap ones with impulse hardened teeth) file, and a file is the right way to sharpen them. Files are quicker than stones too, so if you can cut it with a file do it- it's gonna be faster than stones-but it also probably means the thing you are sharpening isn't super hard.

The chisel in question is an Irwin general purpose chisel, which seem to be hardened to RC58. The generic files seem to be T12 tool steel which, assuming a normal quenched temper, looks to come in at at least RC62.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Well I'll tell you what *is* hardened, work hardened, that is, the Sabatier chef's knife I spent some time sharpening only for today while cooking to knock it off the counter point first into the floor, where the point coiled up like butter and snapped off. Annoying, I've had that knife a long time.

The only good thing is that I managed to override my instinct to put a foot out to catch it, so I don't have to go to the hospital.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Jaded Burnout posted:

The chisel in question is an Irwin general purpose chisel, which seem to be hardened to RC58. The generic files seem to be T12 tool steel which, assuming a normal quenched temper, looks to come in at at least RC62.
Learn something new every day! I'll have to try it out. If it works, it seems like it would be a better option than grinding badly damaged edges as it wouldn't ruin the temper.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Learn something new every day! I'll have to try it out. If it works, it seems like it would be a better option than grinding badly damaged edges as it wouldn't ruin the temper.

I didn't give the slightest poo poo about the file because they're the cheapest generics I could find, but I've checked it just now and it seems to not be especially worn, though I can't imagine it's the best thing for the life of the file.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






I just messed around with this because I was curious. On my old Cr-Va steel Freud beater chisels it works well, cuts reasonably fast, but my cheap chinesium Harbor Freight file is noticeably duller (maybe just clogged? Donít have a file card) My better, finer file seems okay. Neither cut my nice Pfeil chisels very well, but both cut quite well on antique high carbon chisels/plane irons. Turns out some of my turning tools are surprisingly hard; the file skated off my big skew. Iíd have thought they would be softer and tougher as they are subjected to considerably more force, but maybe they are just better HSS?

Anyway, good trick to keep in the back pocket, especially if you donít have a grinder.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Anyway, good trick to keep in the back pocket, especially if you donít have a grinder.

Yeah, doing it properly would be ideal, but also I think a lot of suppliers aren't too choosy about their tempering. A grinder is one of those real nice-to-haves.

NotJustANumber99
Feb 15, 2012

Unlike me, many of you have accepted the situation of your imprisonment, and will die here like rotten cabbages.


Like I can't really tell what I'm looking at here so I don't really know what I'm talking about (also its kind of dickish of me to say what you should have of done now) but is that a new internal stud wall to a bathroom without insulation in it? I always put some rockwool or something to try and cover the sounds of my making GBS threads (does not apply to posts on the internet).

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




NotJustANumber99 posted:

Like I can't really tell what I'm looking at here so I don't really know what I'm talking about (also its kind of dickish of me to say what you should have of done now) but is that a new internal stud wall to a bathroom without insulation in it? I always put some rockwool or something to try and cover the sounds of my making GBS threads (does not apply to posts on the internet).

It is, yes, though I didn't build it myself, that was the builders. I'm not sure which of those walls have insulation if any, though one of them is double skin brick.

It's the guest bathroom, so perhaps minimal making GBS threads.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Screws in the bathroom doorframe need removing, the ones that missed the stud and in one case likely caused the problem with the out of square jamb.




I did a real subtle job.



Next I wanted to put together some test boards for setting up the router and jig, for which I bought a rough saw board a while ago from the local hardware superstore. It has a horrendous cup in it.

Fortunately, since the cup runs the whole length and I now own a jointer, this can be fixed by doubling pieces up with the cup matched, and then trimming down afterwards.





In order to do that I need better access to my jointer. Part of the reason I've lacked motivation to do anything is that my workspace is full.

So, one thing I can do is move everything that can safely live outside, like all of the aluminium at the back.



But I didn't want to do *that* until I got out and trimmed the garden back. So when a nice enough day came around I did just that.







While I'm at it I would also like to move all these crates out of there, and in order to do that I need to free up one of the front rooms which is currently stalled awaiting a final coat of paint. So let's get onto that.

Needs sanding back to get rid of the horrible orange peel finish the painter left.





Next it needs a wipe down with a damp cloth and it can have a final coat. Parts of the ceiling are also a garbage finish and will need to be sanded and touched up.

In more fun news, doing this made my sander very trendy.


Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






Cleaning up and getting organized is the most important work sometimes.


Are the studs around your bathroom treated? They look kind of green, but maybe it's just the light/camera.

tetrapyloctomy
Feb 18, 2003

Okay -- you talk WAY too fast.

Nap Ghost


At first glance this looked like fingertips neatly arranged on a grinding wheel. A touch concerning, that.

Jesus In A Can
Jul 2, 2007
From Concentrate

tetrapyloctomy posted:

At first glance this looked like fingertips neatly arranged on a grinding wheel. A touch concerning, that.

Still got the two thumbs, tho.

Tomarse
Mar 7, 2001

Grr

Jaded Burnout posted:

In order to do that I need better access to my jointer. Part of the reason I've lacked motivation to do anything is that my workspace is full.

So, one thing I can do is move everything that can safely live outside, like all of the aluminium at the back.

I think you need to sort yourself a bigger outdoor storage shed and then build yourself a proper garage/workshop in the garden... (or put your kitchen somewhere else and keep that room as your workshop )

one positive of a big shed/garage is that it also means less gardening to do...

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Are the studs around your bathroom treated? They look kind of green, but maybe it's just the light/camera.

They appear to be, yes.

Tomarse posted:

then build yourself a proper garage/workshop in the garden...

That is on the cards, yes, but way down the line.

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Tomarse
Mar 7, 2001

Grr

Jaded Burnout posted:

I'll let you know how the Trend one I just bought is.

Have you used this yet? I'm trying to make some furniture out of 15mm birch ply and my Clarke 1/4 is really struggling and the sparks coming out of the motor do not fill me with confidence!. I need to buy a 1/2 router before I attempt any more door cutouts!

Birch ply is much harder than I thought it would be. Some sections of some of the layers I had to drop to doing 1mm depth at a time and one part took a chunk out of my router bit and caused a sawdust fire

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