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Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Tomarse posted:

Have you used this yet? I'm trying to make some furniture out of 15mm birch ply and my Clarke 1/4 is really struggling and the sparks coming out of the motor do not fill me with confidence!. I need to buy a 1/2 router before I attempt any more door cutouts!

Birch ply is much harder than I thought it would be. Some sections of some of the layers I had to drop to doing 1mm depth at a time and one part took a chunk out of my router bit and caused a sawdust fire

Not yet, no. I've finished painting the front room, so this weekend I'll be shuffling things around, and once that's done I'll be in a position to operate the jointer, and when *that's* done I'll be able to get started with the router.

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Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




I'm pretty sure seagulls have nested on my roof. Please don't peck holes in my flat tar roof.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns






I think gullís eggs used to be considered a real delicacy.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

I think gullís eggs used to be considered a real delicacy.

1. I think they've hatched
2. Wouldn't want to eat anything that's been fed on local scraps
3. Super illegal

wooger
Apr 16, 2005

YOU RESENT?

Jaded Burnout posted:

1. I think they've hatched
2. Wouldn't want to eat anything that's been fed on local scraps
3. Super illegal

Super illegal may be an overstatement. Based on what Iíve seen recently the police are hardly bothering with speeding, blatant illegal parking and things that directly endanger human life. Who is even going to know if you kill a few sky-rats?

Apparently the one positive of Brexit might be that we can kill seagulls again. Theyíre worse than pigeons where I am, and I could kill tens a day happily with an air rifle to unwind.

grillster
Dec 25, 2004



wooger posted:

Super illegal may be an overstatement. Based on what Iíve seen recently the police are hardly bothering with speeding, blatant illegal parking and things that directly endanger human life. Who is even going to know if you kill a few sky-rats?

Apparently the one positive of Brexit might be that we can kill seagulls again. Theyíre worse than pigeons where I am, and I could kill tens a day happily with an air rifle to unwind.

Hell if you wanna go stealth just set up a rat trap

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




wooger posted:

Super illegal may be an overstatement. Based on what Iíve seen recently the police are hardly bothering with speeding, blatant illegal parking and things that directly endanger human life. Who is even going to know if you kill a few sky-rats?

Apparently the one positive of Brexit might be that we can kill seagulls again. Theyíre worse than pigeons where I am, and I could kill tens a day happily with an air rifle to unwind.

It's been illegal to gently caress with nests since 1954, and in any case, is not my style.

Powerful Two-Hander
Mar 9, 2004

Mods please change my name to "Tooter Skeleton" TIA.



Pretty sure the police had a manhunt for a guy that broke a seagull's neck after it stole his chips and that's definitely going to ruin your day. Also don't lay poison outside of an actual rat trap it's just going to end up with something else eating it, though someone told me that rat poison is often actually warfarin which may or may not be toxic to other things.

Anyway if you really want to get rid of seagulls, get a Harris hawk. One used to get brought round to my office to scare them off the roof and it works a treat.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



I'm sure the neighbors would appreciate a dead seagull scaring effigy.
https://www.amazon.com/Dead-Seagull...s/dp/B08268GTFK

It's even got one positive review!

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Fun! The river police station in London has one of the fake hawks on a line that gets blown around.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




I've been doing a little research into wood refinishing as I want to get my cladding in good shape this summer.

From what I've read (thanks Kaiser for your recommendation of Bob Flexner's book) the combination of oils and waxes I bought and first applied (probably inadequately) aren't going to cut it for the finish I want, which is natural wood unsilvered forever. Basically there isn't one.

My instinct if using oxalic acid to remove the current silvering was apparently a good one, and I can sand if need be afterwards, and I should hopefully be able to leave everything on the wall.

So, my options seem to be
1. Refinish as best as possible with the finishes I have, which will work but not for a super long time. I might have to refinish it multiple times a year.
2. Do it marine style, with a bunch of layers of gloss marine varnish, which will give more protection but a different look, and less (but still some) maintenance.

I suspect it might be option 3: both. Apply using what I have then refinish again next spring with something more serious.

I've also confirmed it's flat sawn, which isn't helping the warp, but apparently the poor finish I did probably caused that as much as anything. Depending how bad it does or doesn't look when I get out there I might try to repair that, but that would involve pulling it all down.

stevewm
May 10, 2005


From a few pages back.. but as someone from the US. I wonder why in the UK they are so paranoid about having electrical sockets/devices in the bathroom.

In the US the situation is quite the opposite. NEC (National Electrical Code) says there shall be an outlet located 3 ft from the edge of a sink.

This:



Is a common sight in US bathrooms. Both of my bathrooms look just like this, with a outlet just over the sink on the wall like that. In the kitchen, the situation is similar.

Of course the outlets must also be GFCI/RCD. Its still common to do GFCI/RCD at the plug, not the breaker box here.

Mystery Steve
Nov 9, 2006


Fun Shoe

Enough room for a toaster, easy to clean too.

upsidedown
Dec 30, 2008


stevewm posted:

From a few pages back.. but as someone from the US. I wonder why in the UK they are so paranoid about having electrical sockets/devices in the bathroom.

In the US the situation is quite the opposite. NEC (National Electrical Code) says there shall be an outlet located 3 ft from the edge of a sink.

This:



Is a common sight in US bathrooms. Both of my bathrooms look just like this, with a outlet just over the sink on the wall like that. In the kitchen, the situation is similar.

Of course the outlets must also be GFCI/RCD. Its still common to do GFCI/RCD at the plug, not the breaker box here.

Plugs near the sink are the norm in Australia too, even with switchboard RCDs. Iíve been living in the UK for 5 years and it still bugs me that I need to charge the electric toothbrush in the kitchen and use an extension cord for the clippers when I trim my beard.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




upsidedown posted:

Plugs near the sink are the norm in Australia too, even with switchboard RCDs. Iíve been living in the UK for 5 years and it still bugs me that I need to charge the electric toothbrush in the kitchen and use an extension cord for the clippers when I trim my beard.

Shaver plugs are a thing.

upsidedown
Dec 30, 2008


Jaded Burnout posted:

Shaver plugs are a thing.

Not really standard kit unless you live somewhere that has been built or renovated recently though.

drgitlin
Jul 25, 2003
WHY DOES EVERYONE IN AUTOMOTIVE INSANITY HATE ME? READ ABOUT IT NOW AT HTTPS://ARSCLOWN.COM/GITHEAD/10 REASONS WHY I AM A PRETENTIOUS TWAT

upsidedown posted:

Not really standard kit unless you live somewhere that has been built or renovated recently though.

Every house I grew up in in the 1980s and 1990s had shaver plugs

upsidedown
Dec 30, 2008


drgitlin posted:

Every house I grew up in in the 1980s and 1990s had shaver plugs

Huh. I must just be unlucky where Iíve rented.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Yeah, my personal experience has been about 50/50, but they've been around for many decades.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Jaded Burnout posted:

I've been doing a little research into wood refinishing as I want to get my cladding in good shape this summer.

From what I've read (thanks Kaiser for your recommendation of Bob Flexner's book) the combination of oils and waxes I bought and first applied (probably inadequately) aren't going to cut it for the finish I want, which is natural wood unsilvered forever. Basically there isn't one.

My instinct if using oxalic acid to remove the current silvering was apparently a good one, and I can sand if need be afterwards, and I should hopefully be able to leave everything on the wall.

So, my options seem to be
1. Refinish as best as possible with the finishes I have, which will work but not for a super long time. I might have to refinish it multiple times a year.
2. Do it marine style, with a bunch of layers of gloss marine varnish, which will give more protection but a different look, and less (but still some) maintenance.

I suspect it might be option 3: both. Apply using what I have then refinish again next spring with something more serious.

I've also confirmed it's flat sawn, which isn't helping the warp, but apparently the poor finish I did probably caused that as much as anything. Depending how bad it does or doesn't look when I get out there I might try to repair that, but that would involve pulling it all down.

I remember this discussion but I think it's gonna be problematic, to me that cladding looked more like an indoors type of thing rather than something that will survive outside. I don't think the growth rings are the real issue as much as the cladding isn't built or designed to surive outside, well ok it will actually survive but it won't keep looking fresh. Not in a climate like the UK anyway. I have a feeling it's gonna be a sisyphean task to try and keep it looking as it did when it was fresh, especially since the design doesn't prevent the boards from twisting and they will do that even with a marine varnish unless they are held down securely onto the substrate.

If you ever redo it, use wider boards and nail them in multiple places, two nails or screws for every stud to prevent warping. Then I'd use a light brown tinted oil, reapply yearly and also clean yearly with anti mold stuff. Or just use a dark stain so the mold stains don't show. Let it age with grace. Though a dark finish can really make things worse when it comes to drying and twisting.

This is why I design outdoor furniture with the intention of aging gracefully.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




His Divine Shadow posted:

I remember this discussion but I think it's gonna be problematic, to me that cladding looked more like an indoors type of thing rather than something that will survive outside. I don't think the growth rings are the real issue as much as the cladding isn't built or designed to surive outside, well ok it will actually survive but it won't keep looking fresh. Not in a climate like the UK anyway. I have a feeling it's gonna be a sisyphean task to try and keep it looking as it did when it was fresh, especially since the design doesn't prevent the boards from twisting and they will do that even with a marine varnish unless they are held down securely onto the substrate.

If you ever redo it, use wider boards and nail them in multiple places, two nails or screws for every stud to prevent warping. Then I'd use a light brown tinted oil, reapply yearly and also clean yearly with anti mold stuff. Or just use a dark stain so the mold stains don't show. Let it age with grace. Though a dark finish can really make things worse when it comes to drying and twisting.

This is why I design outdoor furniture with the intention of aging gracefully.

I mean, it's specifically designed for being outside. Whether it was designed well or not I can't judge, but it's from a place that does exclusively external cladding and is profiled to allow rain runoff. The profile is called "rain screen" or similar.

I am planning on using screws to refix it, which should also allow me to give it more space for movement than it has now.

I agree that keeping it looking properly fresh is a Sisyphean task that I don't fancy taking on, so I'm readjusting my expectations, to doing a better job of fixing and UV protecting this year, and then next year either marine varnishing (which is afaict aided mostly by being glossy (for reflection) and multiple layers of UV protectant), or some sort of tint as you suggest (which again, pigment is a good UV protector).

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.

The classic look around here is dark stained wood but lots of the new build places are unstained or old wood effect. I can ask what treatment they're using on my way past if you like.

It's pretty common for chalets to have larch shingle roofs, this is my neighbour. Not the effect you are after but the siding should last ages even if you leave it. (may be misremembering but I think your siding is larch)

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




It is larch yeah. I'm not too worried about longevity as such, and I'll need to settle on a new appearance eventually. Keeping it fresh forever isn't realistic. I just hate the greyed look.

wooger
Apr 16, 2005

YOU RESENT?

Jaded Burnout posted:

It is larch yeah. I'm not too worried about longevity as such, and I'll need to settle on a new appearance eventually. Keeping it fresh forever isn't realistic. I just hate the greyed look.

Whatís the name of that Japanese technique where you blowtorch they gently caress out of wood to create a weatherproof long term finish.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007




It's 焼杉板 yaki sugi ita
https://quohome.com/story/?p=7127

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011

Running no point.


That's really cool

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Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Very interesting! Though not my style.

Google's translation of japanese is getting better. Mostly.

quote:

Don't lick a child

I always touch that it's Yasugi

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