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NotJustANumber99
Feb 15, 2012



lol, find some soil you know is good and send them that. Do not end up in a situation where you are piling for your permitted development shed or whatever the gently caress cos of a bit of clay and some dead bushes.

like what foundations did your extension need?

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Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




NotJustANumber99 posted:

lol, find some soil you know is good and send them that.

Sure just let me look in my "known good soil samples" bin.

Seriously though, I'm paying for the advice for a reason, if I don't want to do the samples I can just say no.

NotJustANumber99 posted:

like what foundations did your extension need?

Filled trenches and a slab, but that was a smaller structure. Piling isn't on the cards, it's just depth of footing, and the tests are like £40.

NotJustANumber99
Feb 15, 2012



Jaded Burnout posted:

Sure just let me look in my "known good soil samples" bin.

Seriously though, I'm paying for the advice for a reason, if I don't want to do the samples I can just say no.


Filled trenches and a slab, but that was a smaller structure. Piling isn't on the cards, it's just depth of footing, and the tests are like £40.

Thats what I was told, now I'm the proud owner of 37 6.5metre deep driven concrete piles. lol kill me.

But yeah given your extension and location I guess you havent got a bunch of high heave clay and mature trees nearby.

You shouldnt need a structural engineer for a big shed though.

NotJustANumber99 fucked around with this message at 23:35 on Feb 17, 2021

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Had a chat with the neighbour to the rear, she was chill and we have the same goals with the fencing so that's cool. She offered to contribute a share of cost of the shared fence if I get the landscapers to clear a bit of brambles on her property.

Afterwards, I started on getting the soil sample. Have you ever heard of a rotary broach? I wanted to try that approach for getting a core sample without fancy core sample tools.

Grabbed a spare length of 4" pipe which I had lying around in the garden, plus a few other tools in case this doesn't work.



Cleared the vegetation.



Press down on the pipe and rotate in circles. Seems to be working.



Got tired a little over half way through, I'll go back to it tomorrow.

C...
Jan 22, 2008

Tootin the Doom Flute has led the Kingdom of Ankist into a new age of illumination. Every morning, people wake up and open palm slam a woodwind instrument into their mouth. It is the Doom Flute and right then and there they start playing the notes. They play every note, and they play every note hard

Just caught up, having read through the whole thread; thanks for sharing! So much detail and all the wins and struggles have been really inspiring (me to stop looking at buying an old house).

schmug posted:

Youre insuferable.

I'd sufer you any day! It's clear when you're asking for advice, and I'd be much less patient with the years of backseat renovators.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004






There's a kernel of truth to what they said, though, so I'm doin' my best.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Jaded Burnout posted:

Got tired a little over half way through, I'll go back to it tomorrow.



https://www.instagram.com/p/CLULQrzHTca/

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Iím very excited to see how easy/impossible that thing is to pull out of the ground.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Iím very excited to see how easy/impossible that thing is to pull out of the ground.

I've been checking as I go, and not easy but not impossible. I guess we'll see at 1m.

Gasmask
Apr 27, 2003

And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee

Now thatís what I call a soil pipe!!

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




The remainder of the depth wasn't too bad, but I tapped out with around 150mm left because it got very difficult, almost certainly because I hit about 200mm of clay and the friction in the pipe became too high. I think if I needed a full core sample it's not a bad DIY way to do it perhaps bolting a bit of a blade to the bottom and/or putting a handle on the top, but if I needed another general sample it's be about the same or less work to just dig it normally next time.

Packaged up ~2kg of it and I'll be dropping that off at the soil testing facility on Monday.

Gasmask posted:

Now thatís what I call a soil pipe!!

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Took a few minutes to clean up the lintel over the bifolds. I was told by the plasterer that these blobs of adhesive were never coming off, and I took that at face value, but with time thought, nah.



Few minutes with a cold chisel and it's gone.




Cleared up the overfoam from the glazier too. Ready for me to reboard it.

NotJustANumber99
Feb 15, 2012



Does it get any insulation or whatever in there?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




NotJustANumber99 posted:

Does it get any insulation or whatever in there?

That's what was on there previously, but not done well. I'll probably use a layer of insulation and then a couple of layers of plasterboard when replacing it.

NotJustANumber99
Feb 15, 2012



As an extension/renovation they don't come and do any air tightness tests or poo poo like that?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




NotJustANumber99 posted:

As an extension/renovation they don't come and do any air tightness tests or poo poo like that?

None at all, no. Just a couple of structural inspections during construction.

Powerful Two-Hander
Mar 9, 2004

Mods please change my name to "Tooter Skeleton" TIA.



What was the adhesive even there for? That was a new beam right?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Powerful Two-Hander posted:

What was the adhesive even there for? That was a new beam right?

It was holding on the insulation. Not very well, clearly.

CancerCakes
Jan 10, 2006


Insulation doesn't really stick very well to things most of the time I think. You could try sticking wood strips to the metal to form a surface flush with the bottom flange, and then screwing insulated plasterboard to that. You can get wood/metal adhesive that works really well, and if you get the wood strips the right width they will friction fit as well.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




I'm considering just going for multiple layers of plasterboard but I don't know if that'll be any better. I'd like to get it done with the adhesives I have on hand, which in this case would be a couple of "construction adhesives".

The photos are possibly misleading, in that there's no way to friction fit on this beam; it's two flat faces at a right angle.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Time to buy a welder! Slightly more seriously, though, I wonder if you could use some strong magnets to hold something up there. Probably more expensive than doing something more reasonable and normal.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Rexxed posted:

Time to buy a welder! Slightly more seriously, though, I wonder if you could use some strong magnets to hold something up there. Probably more expensive than doing something more reasonable and normal.

I don't think plasterboard welds too well.

Wrar
Sep 9, 2002



Soiled Meat

There are some incredibly effective structural epoxies. Cursedshitbox's awesome camper is probably 10% epoxy by mass.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Wrar posted:

There are some incredibly effective structural epoxies. Cursedshitbox's awesome camper is probably 10% epoxy by mass.

I don't have any epoxies on hand (other than resin), but looking through my adhesives the relevant ones I have here are
- 151 Hard As Nails High Power Exterior Adhesive
- Evo-Stik Gripfill Xtra (about a fifth of a tube)

Can you tell this poo poo is marketed at dudes.

Neither of them say what they actually are but I think they're similar products just based on usage instructions, and there should be enough to do the job.

NotJustANumber99
Feb 15, 2012



Exposed steel. Now you've tidied it up.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Placed an order for a soil stack for the main house, since I'm gearing up to finish the upstairs bathroom.

Sketched out plan.



Not to scale. The steep angle near the top roof isn't important because that's just air venting, there's no water there. I can't take it straight up because it has to go 900mm above the top of the (openable) skylight which would need like 2m of stick-out.

Ordered from an online company and it came out at £234.88 delivered, then I noticed that delivery was £45+VAT, so I cancelled that and ordered from Screwfix, where the delivery was free and the total was £185.02 for basically the same stuff.



If anything is missing when I actually get to it then I can head down to a local place to pick up the bits and bobs. The main thing was delivery of the 3m lengths of pipe which I don't have a way to transport.

I'll need to figure out screws but I have a lot of that stuff on hand so we'll see if I need more. Someone asked on the site what size screws the brackets need, and the manufacturer replied "Any appropriate screw will be suitable" which is like yeah dude this is Questions & Answers not Questions & Tautologies.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Jaded Burnout posted:

If anything is missing when I actually get to it then I can head down to a local place to pick up the bits and bobs. The main thing was delivery of the 3m lengths of pipe which I don't have a way to transport.

Sorted obviously but I've picked up 3m lengths in a fiat Panda and 4.8m lengths in a Volvo sedan, just strapped a hivis jacket to the protruding length, fine if there are no tight corners on your route home

quote:

I'll need to figure out screws but I have a lot of that stuff on hand so we'll see if I need more. Someone asked on the site what size screws the brackets need, and the manufacturer replied "Any appropriate screw will be suitable" which is like yeah dude this is Questions & Answers not Questions & Tautologies.

I know this is for liability reasons but they could at least tell you the approx weight loading/diameter of screw so you can choose length etc yourself depending on what your installing it to, I understand the frustration here.

cakesmith handyman fucked around with this message at 11:49 on Feb 24, 2021

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




cakesmith handyman posted:

Sorted obviously but I've picked up 3m lengths in a fiat Panda and 4.8m lengths in a Volvo sedan, just strapped a hivis jacket to the protruding length, fine if there are no tight corners on your route home

Yeah 3m is.. possible if I stick some out of the window, but if I can avoid it, probably best.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Took a few minutes to set up my 3D printer and start a test print. I'll show you what it is in 3 days I guess.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Jaded Burnout posted:

Took a few minutes to set up my 3D printer and start a test print. I'll show you what it is in 3 days I guess.



That's a sizeable test print, venturing on the longest prints I've ever done. I know you've read the 3d printer thread but a benchy boat isn't a bad place to start and takes a couple of hours depending on infill and wall settings. Since you got a prusa it'll probably be fine, though.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Rexxed posted:

That's a sizeable test print, venturing on the longest prints I've ever done. I know you've read the 3d printer thread but a benchy boat isn't a bad place to start and takes a couple of hours depending on infill and wall settings. Since you got a prusa it'll probably be fine, though.

Turns out, not fine. I checked on it after a couple of hours and it had started to lift at the corners, so I cancelled the print. The huge length of time turned out to be because prusaslicer defaults to 0.05mm layers despite the manual saying not to bother with anything finer than 0.1mm.

The SD card came with a bunch of test files on it and I think that boat is one of them so I may give that a go. It's not strictly the first print on the machine since they did one in the factory, but it's the first since I got it.

NotJustANumber99
Feb 15, 2012



cakesmith handyman posted:

3m lengths in a fiat Panda

Same.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Jaded Burnout posted:

Turns out, not fine. I checked on it after a couple of hours and it had started to lift at the corners, so I cancelled the print. The huge length of time turned out to be because prusaslicer defaults to 0.05mm layers despite the manual saying not to bother with anything finer than 0.1mm.

The SD card came with a bunch of test files on it and I think that boat is one of them so I may give that a go. It's not strictly the first print on the machine since they did one in the factory, but it's the first since I got it.

Yeah I print 90% of things at 0.2mm layer height since it's a good ratio of quality and speed. I generally only go to .1 (or finer although I tend to limit to .08 due to the z axis thread pitch which may or may not be some dumb cargo cult measurements) for really fine detail stuff like the RC Jeep I'm printing. It adds a lot of print time, however.

Thomas Sanladerer did a series on 3d printing basics recently that may be worth a look. Some stuff is obvious but some is not and he broke them into reasonably short segments.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nb-Bzf4nQdE

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Rexxed posted:

(or finer although I tend to limit to .08 due to the z axis thread pitch which may or may not be some dumb cargo cult measurements)

I didn't want to jump on this, but what's the logic here? I'm no gearing expert but I can't see how pitch would have any effect other than on the speed of the ball screw.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



Jaded Burnout posted:

I didn't want to jump on this, but what's the logic here? I'm no gearing expert but I can't see how pitch would have any effect other than on the speed of the ball screw.

The idea is that it aligns the steps on the stepper(s) for the lead screw on the Z axis based on the thread pitch of the lead screw and the height you want to move up each layer. The goal is to have the stepper stop at the same intervals that match the 1.8' steps if you can because CHEP says the microsteps aren't always completely equal at stopping between step degrees (and nobody's going to align the bed height and z-axis perfectly with a stepper step). I'm not sure if that translates to all stepper drivers or if he's saying the blame is more on the mechanics between the magnets and the coils. The original ender 3 has the classic noisy a4988 stepper driver chips while the board I upgraded to (and the Prusa) has TMC drivers so you'd think those would be higher quality but if it's considered a stepper electromagnetic issue then I would think it would be more widely talked about. I just don't know enough about the subject to have a strong opinion.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIkT8asT90A

You can see towards the end of the video when he magnifies it the .1mm layer heights look less evenly stacked than the .12mm. It's hard to say if that's a consistent result and I'm not going to bother trying it myself. I kind of feel like it's one of those things that generally doesn't matter that much, but I have sometimes shot for .04mm increments on the Ender 3 just to try and keep maximum quality if I'm printing something I want to look really nice and I just hope it helps. Like I said, though, I usually print at .2mm layer height so it's rare for me to be doing something finer. Since January I've been working on a RC Jeep from 3dsets and I want those parts to look good so I went to .12 instead of the recommended .15 and turned the speed down a bit (which probably has a more pronounced quality bump on the final part). It did result in a lot of super long prints and then something broke (taking blobbed up plastic off the hotend I snapped the thermistor wire so I decided it was upgrade time and put an all-metal hotend and new heat block and new heater cartridge on) so I'm not quite done yet.

So, it's a weird topic. It's hard to argue with CHEP's results from his pictures but I haven't given it enough thought test it myself. It kind of feels like a woo thing simply because he calls it magic numbers, though.

cakesmith handyman
Jul 22, 2007

Pip-Pip old chap! Last one in is a rotten egg what what.



Magic numbers sounds woo and I found more even looking layers with 0.04 steps, but my wife thinks I'm imagining it so confirmation bias maybe?


drat, I need a roof rack. Did the Renault survive those slabs?

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




It occurred to me last night that one of the horizontal waste pipes is going to intersect directly with a downpipe, which is actually OK, I can just cut it shorter and run it into the stack, possibly even way up near the roofline.

That said, having received delivery of 18m of 4" waste pipe this morning I've just realised that because of the location of the stack I can probably get away with terminating it half way up the wall rather than loving around all the way up at the roof. I'll need to double check the space available, but the rule is that the pipe has to terminate 900mm above any opening to the house *that is within 3m*. So if I can find a spot on the vertical of the stack line which is a) high enough to accept the horizontal waste line, b) high enough to be at least 900mm overhead, and c) 3m from any window or door, I can avoid a lot of work and ladder climbing.

I suspect this spot will be 3m above the ground but I need to check. If so I'll reuse the leftover pipe when we dig the waste line from the workshop. (above-ground waste pipe can be used underground, but not vice versa).

cakesmith handyman posted:

Magic numbers sounds woo and I found more even looking layers with 0.04 steps, but my wife thinks I'm imagining it so confirmation bias maybe?

Maybe I'll do some tests later.

Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Blade guard arm was annoying me on the planer, so I removed it.



Who uses this many (types of) fasteners?




Much better.



As mentioned above, got around to setting up the 3D printer.



Rough initial results.




Better results, possibly from a cleaner bed.

https://i.imgur.com/y3hMtJ8.mp4

Waste/vent pipes arrived.



This is probably where I'll terminate the vent. I checked distances and it's far enough away from everything so I don't need to go all the way up to the roof.



Checking to make sure I had the right screws and plugs for the brackets, which I do.



Turns out when I was talking about a drainpipe intersecting a waste pipe I was wrong; I was mixing up two areas of wall. Unfortunately though I can't find any standard fittings locally for connecting a rain pipe into a waste pipe, they seem to have slightly different standards of sizes and angles, so I'm going to keep the two systems separate above ground.

Went to screwfix and picked up all the bits I need.



Also went looking for the existing hole in the wall where the old waste pipe came out. It's supposed to be here.



Oops. I do have vague memories of telling the renderer to just cover it up, maybe? Well they sure did, anyway. Should be OK to open it up again, I guess.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




Those euro style blade guards have always seemed really inconvenient to me. Do you have any plans to make a different one? I think the American Ďpork chopí ones work well and shouldnít be too hard to DIY. My old boss had a 16Ē jointer with no blade guard at all and it was fine if a bit scary at first when face joining wide stuff, but Iím much much happier now with the spinning blades covered.

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Jaded Burnout
Jul 10, 2004




Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

Those euro style blade guards have always seemed really inconvenient to me. Do you have any plans to make a different one? I think the American Ďpork chopí ones work well and shouldnít be too hard to DIY. My old boss had a 16Ē jointer with no blade guard at all and it was fine if a bit scary at first when face joining wide stuff, but Iím much much happier now with the spinning blades covered.

That would probably be a good idea.

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