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Ghost Leviathan
Mar 2, 2017



pentyne posted:

Are there clear reasons this happens? Like some creator went from studio/network oversight to free reign and loving went balls deep into alt-right lol trans people humor?

IIRC the original writers all left.

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1000 Brown M and Ms
Oct 22, 2008

F:\DL>quickfli 4-clowns.fli

In the case of Trailer Park Boys, while I'm not sure of the timing, the three lead actors bought the rights off the original creator for the Netflix seasons and became writers/showrunners for TPB. There was a definite drop in quality in general for those, not just in terms of transphobia. I don't think that's a coincidence, I think the three leads just aren't good comedy writers.

The three leads have another Netflix series and it looks like it's pretty much Trailer Park Boys with the serial numbers filed off, although to be fair I haven't actually watched it. It's pretty damning if you have to plagiarise your own material to come up with anything new.

GoutPatrol
Oct 17, 2009

Coal Jobs for the Coal God


Nap Ghost

hard counter posted:

i don't think the early parts aged particularly well, but pierce from the community pretty much underwent a gradual metamorphosis into caricature where he became a yellow-face wearing, out-and-out racist whereas, iirc, the original concept for the character was that he was a kind of time capsule: an old man set in ways the world left behind long ago going to college in his later years who, thanks to new college experiences, can actually learn from mistakes the new setting exposes in him and maybe he'll come around?

i guess you could think of it as a flanderization of turning someone who's more insulated and out-of-touch into someone more like richard spencer

As the characters of Community were slowly adding more of the actor's personalities into their roles, it turned Pierce more racist, because it turns out, Chevy Chase is an rear end in a top hat racist and everyone didn't like him. By the end of season 3 it was Dan Harmon just adding more and more vindictive parts of Chevy into Pierce just to piss Chevy off more.

pentyne
Nov 7, 2012

I posted a 7 point defense of corporate wage theft because my brain is full of worms.

GoutPatrol posted:

As the characters of Community were slowly adding more of the actor's personalities into their roles, it turned Pierce more racist, because it turns out, Chevy Chase is an rear end in a top hat racist and everyone didn't like him. By the end of season 3 it was Dan Harmon just adding more and more vindictive parts of Chevy into Pierce just to piss Chevy off more.

While looking up community details I found this piece that holy gently caress did not age well
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/n...n-firing-327971

quote:

Nobody gets fired by accident -- especially the creator of a television show.

This story first appeared in the June 1 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.

Nobody gets fired by accident -- especially the creator of a television show. That's because when you're the showrunner of a network TV series, what you actually are is the CEO of a $60 million company, someone who creates a new product from scratch every eight days. As CEO, you make all creative and business decisions. You manage a crew of 200, write or rewrite every episode and have the luxury (and burden) of final cut. It is, in every sense of the word, your show.

So to replace a showrunner is no small thing. That said, it turns out to be surprisingly easy. You just make a couple of phone calls.

There's a story Lorne Michaels tells at the end of Bill Carter's book The War for Late Night about quitting Saturday Night Live. Lorne said that in his exit interview, a certain high-level executive at NBC said (I'm paraphrasing), "We paid you to deliver a certain number of episodes for a certain budget in a certain number of days. Nowhere in your contract does it say the show has to be good. If you believe it has to be good, then that's on you. You can't get mad at us for getting in your way." Quality, in other words, is not the point. Money and ratings are the point.

Dan Harmon found this out the hard way on May 18. Sony Television (and, by not standing up for him, NBC) fired Harmon as the CEO of Community. They wanted a product for a certain price in a certain number of days. He wanted it to be good.

Now the rumors are that Harmon was "difficult," both to work with and to work for. I have no real information about this one way or another, but even if it's true, Dan's personality was a symptom of the problem, not the problem itself. Because -- and here's the dirty secret of television -- there are plenty of showrunners who are difficult. Some are even truly Machiavellian, hated and feared by all. But as long as their shows are hits, no one would ever think about replacing them.

Community, as we know, was not a hit. From their actions, though, Sony and NBC made it clear that they hope to get a couple more seasons out of the show so they can push it into the black via syndication. They apparently are willing to do this at the expense of the series itself. But again, remember, neither the studio nor the network cares about making a "good" show, in a fan sense. They need it to be "good" in a ratings sense. A money sense. Which it wasn't.

It takes a certain temperament to be a TV showrunner -- a kind of humble megalomania. You have to like being in charge, but you also have to accept that you work for two major corporations. And ultimately it is they, not you, who decide whether you or your show lives or dies.

So if you're going to be difficult, you drat well better be successful.

The author is a television writer-producer who has run a broadcast network series.

Dan Harmon was fired because he fell in love with one of the female writers and ruthlessly harassed her to the point of nearly driving her out of the industry when she didn't return his affection. He also left his wife during that time because he expected that the woman writer would then realize he was serious about her and fall in love with him.

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