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fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

CannonFodder posted:

Cowboy Bebop was airing on Adult Swim for it's original US run when 9/11 happened, and they removed the Teddy Bomber episode because it opens with twin skyscrapers having bombs go off between them, dropping the bridge that connected them at the like 30th floor. On the second run they brought back that episode.

The thing I most remember about Cartoon Network's reaction to 9/11 was that they pulled the last five or six episodes of the original Mobile Suit Gundam under the guise of not wanting to show so much violence (A token excuse because the show had drawn crappy ratings and they wanted a reason to stop airing it), but they kept airing the much newer (And more violent) Cowboy Bebop. Literally two days after 9/11 they reran the most recent episode, Gateway Shuffle, which opens with terrorists shooting up a restaurant full of people.

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fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

muscles like this! posted:

They kind of did that for the last season. Topher Grace announced he was leaving at the end of the previous season so they cast Bret Harrison as "Charlie" the son of one of Red's old war buddies. He was very clearly written as the New Eric character but he was so bad that when the show came back the next season they killed him off-screen.

It wasn't that Bret Harrison's character was terrible, it's that he got an offer for his own series and went off to do that. Things were compounded by Ashton Kutcher also leaving the the show, so in the next season you get Josh Meyers' character Randy basically filling in for both but being generally bland and annoying.

Comedy Central started airing That 70's Show in the mornings a few months ago and I'll often have it on as background noise and it holds up well enough, particularly the early seasons. I think the first couple of years generally had better stories and better utilized the setting. By the fourth or fifth season, though, the plots turn to generic sitcom stuff with a 70's veneer slapped on it, and I think the production values fell a bit (I can't not notice the point where Topher Grace started wearing a wig), but it was still entertaining enough until the last season or two. That's kinda when the plots got a bit too repetitive and they tried to introduce a bunch of new characters that were just annoying or uninteresting (Hyde's sister, then his stripper wife, Randy).

Arivia posted:

The one season where original Law & Order does an ongoing plot line it gets very bad. Briscoe hires a hitman to kill his daughter's murderer, Curtis is about to quit the force to help care for his wife, Van Buren is about to get fired, McCoy is getting disbarred, Ross is leaving the DA's office because she can't cover for McCoy any more, and Schiff is about to lose an election. The next season, none of that sticks except Ross leaving. It just all gets forgotten over how bad it was.

L&O is also an example that replacing characters can work. Some of the show's best seasons are the last three, which only share two characters (McCoy and Van Buren) with the above from a decade earlier.

It's kinda funny because, in earlier seasons, Law & Order gave just enough hints at characters lives outsides the cases to give them color, but never made it a focus of the show. A good example is McCoy and Kincaid are pretty obviously having an affair for most of the two seasons they are both in the show, but it's not like they went out of the way to show the two of them in bed or even hint at it every single episode. You can even see it starting to unravel to some extent prior to the end of the sixth season, and then it comes up several times in later seasons, basically leading to the stuff you mentioned about McCoy getting disciplined and nearly disbarred.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Long or short version, itís still been edited out for probably six or seven years at this point anytime Iíve heard it on radio or wherever. They used to just mute the word ďhuman beingĒ, like some songs will mute curse words, but more recently the versions Iíve heard either mute all the vocals in that section or remove it entirely, skipping to the next course.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Volcott posted:

Murph, who stood on top of a burning tank and machinegunned like 500 Germans, was rad as hell. He also had an amount of medals you usually only see on third-world dictators.



And then plays himself in the movie about it all, which blew my mind when I was a kid.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

JediTalentAgent posted:

I'm pretty sure there's a broadcast/antenna channel that does a huge block of Vanilla Law and Order (and maybe CI, occasionally) episodes once a week. I think "Ion" is the channel. But I seem to think everytime I've turned it on and seen a random episode they've been post-Briscoe/Logan ones.


Ion only shows like seasons 12 or 13 and everything after that. WE TV, however, also does large blocks of the original series a few times a week and they show everything prior to that, maybe with one season of overlap, but not past season 13 or so.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

tactlessbastard posted:

My siblings and I loved 7 days of 007

burial posted:

According to Google, it was TBS. That never wouldíve been my guess.

Forget the 7 days of Bond, in the late 90s/early 00s there was a cable station that played them nonstop from Thanksgiving through Christmas. They'd air the all the Eon movies through License to Kill (Plus Never Say Never Again) in no particular order practically 24 hours a day (Some years/channels had paid programming from like 3-5 AM) and it was awesome. My memory is that it was TNN (Who did air them around 2002/3, switching to MXC in the early AM, before it changed over to Spike) but some Google'in tells me it might have been USA or TNT prior to that.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

TBS still has like 3+ hours of Seinfeld nearly every day that theyíve had for the last 15 years, itís just split between like one at 10 AM and one at like 7 PM, rather than being all at once in the evening. I think they also still do a ton of Married... With Children in the early morning too.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Iron Crowned posted:

Mind of Mencia was just a cheap knock off of The Chappelle Show, because he up and vanished for a decade, change my mind.

I mean, was there ever any disagreement over that? Dave ran off, and Iím pretty sure Mind of Mencia was the show that replaced the aborted third season, I think even in the same exact time slot, in the summer of 2005.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Toshimo posted:

Was Rio Bravo the one he made 2 or 3 times with different actors?

Yeah. El Dorado is essentially the same exact plot and characters, although I think it was played a little bit lighter/more comedic than Rio Bravo. Wikipedia also says Rio Lobo was the third time that Howard Hawks and John Wayne did the same basic plot, but I honestly donít remember that movie at all.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Scary Movie 3 was directed by David Zucker too, which is why it's got some elements of the Airplane! and Naked Gun humor in them. It's definitely the best of those movies. Mindlessly entertaining if nothing else, although I'll admit I probably haven't seen most of it in 10+ years.

That said, Leslie Nielson wondering what President Ford would do in his situation, and then looking at a painting of Harrison Ford always got me.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret


Thatís clearly just David Lee Roth from 1980.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Vincent Van Goatse posted:

Jerry Orbach did the same thing. He played a defense attorney before becoming Lenny Briscoe.

Jeremy Sisto played a defense attorney in the last episode of season 17, and then was introduced as Detective Lupo in the first episode of season 18.

L&O, particularly the original series, is notable for reusing a ton of actors at least once, sometimes twice (Maybe even more) a season in different roles. As some else mentioned, when these episodes originally aired months apart, and sometimes with the actors being in different make up or having more or less screen time (Big difference from being the suspect who is in the entire episode, vs a witness with one line prior to the :doink: & opening credits), itís harder to spot. But, watching it in syndication where youíll see an entire season in a week, you start spotting all sorts of faces popping up a lot.

fartknocker has a new favorite as of 04:18 on Sep 15, 2019

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

rodbeard posted:

Jim Gaffigan has been in 4 episodes of Law and Order as different people. You would think they wouldn't recycle an actor that was already famous prior to guest starring. Also the woman that wrote Waitress was on an episode of Law and Order and later her real life murder was used for a ripped from the headlines episode.

To be fair, I think only one of those he played a prominent role, and that was in the last season I think. His first two or three appearances were blink and youíd miss them, one scene things well before he was famous.

Like, Chadwick Boseman was in one episode as a drug dealer or something in like 2003, and I didnít make the ďOh poo poo, thatís the guy from Black Panther!Ē connection until We TV had a commercial highlighting a bunch of people who became famous much later. Both Charlie Day and Rob McElhenney appeared in episodes a few years apart (The latter when he was still like a teenager), and I think at one point Anna Gunn and the guy who played Gale from Breaking Bad where either in the same episode or back to back ones.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Arivia posted:

Wouldnít that have been back during the trucking culture fad with Convoy and all that?

No, that was more mid-late 70s, where as License to Kill was '89. It was more just an attempt to put a different spin on the semi-usual/required Bond vehicle chase. A few of them have done boat chases, Octopussy had them on scooters or something, GoldenEye used a tank, Tomorrow Never Dies had them on a motorcycle running from a helicopter, etc.

I'm also in the camp that the two Dalton movies are pretty good, but for the era they were kind of a departure from what the franchise had done before. Licence to Kill in particular is pretty dark for a pre-Craig reboot Bond film, and was hurt in the U.S. by having its title changed shortly before release, and coming out during a rather stacked summer of big movies (Namely Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and Batman, among others).

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret


So... Cinemax after Dark?

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Yeah, itís a basically an old urban legend. With the VHS/Beta one, IIRC, the super short version was Beta was made by only one company (Sony?) who didnít want to make major changes to their tapes/machines and they stayed sorta expensive. VHS was made by someone else and licensed to whoever wanted to make the machines/tapes, so they got cheaper and changes got made (Notably tapes getting longer and longer).

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Arivia posted:

Note that those episodes guest-starred Julia Roberts at the height of her career too (she was dating one of the series' stars, Benjamin Bratt).

No she didn't. She appeared in one episode, Empire, a season or two later about someone trying to build a football stadium and who got killed by viagra.

The rest is pretty much right on, though. I remember Law & Order basically being big until Jerry Orbach left, then went through a few years with cast stuff, bottoming out in season 17. It actually got good again after that, with the last few seasons having a pretty good cast that worked well together, and it was kind of a bummer it ended when it did.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Ugly In The Morning posted:

It was more this is absolutely losing on appeal and I donít want them to make a Supreme Court case out of it, IIRC. Similar, but less ďI think youíre straight up wrongĒ and more ďI donít want this poisoning the well in the futureĒ

It may have been intended to be the latter view, but the former is easy to interpret as that specific judge shows up a few times in those seasons as essentially an antagonist, specifically disliking McCoy, until Nora essentially threatens him.

Arivia posted:

Also if you've never seen it, Season 8 ends with McCoy almost getting disbarred; he gets censured over hiding a witness from the defense so he can win a case. McCoy definitely went too far a fair amount of the time.

And didn't the thing about him dating his subordinates actually pop up later as a gotcha in a case? Like one of the past ADAs tells the current one about McCoy doing that to try and force her off a case (I seem to think it was maybe Jamie Ross to Connie Rubirosa?) Because we all knew it happened with Kincaid, the gotcha was that it had kept going (and maybe explained the whole Southerlyn lesbian breakdown at her firing.)

The former comes up a few times latter on with Cutter, where McCoy mentions a few older cases getting overturned on appeal or him having gone way over the line. The one I specifically recall being brought back up is the episode from season 5, Precious, where he tried to have a woman sterilized after she kept killing her babies. Cutter brings it up at one point, and McCoy admits he was wrong at the time.

For the latter, I remember a former ADA mentioning that to Kincaid once (Google'd it, was the episode Trophy from season 6), and McCoy's history with his previous assistants gets brought up now and then, but I don't recall it being implied he did anything with any of the others after that. Like, Ross makes references to dating outside of the office, and at least once they talk about her setting up McCoy with a friend of hers (And asking why Claire Kincaid's name came up on that date). I don't recall them showing McCoy's relationships with any of the others that came later being anything other than working ones.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

artsy fartsy posted:

I've never seen any of the Law and Orders--which is the best?

rydiafan posted:

Classic. Start from the beginning and stop once Jerry Orbach leaves.

Pretty much this, which still gets you like 14 full seasons that are all mostly good stuff.

The next few seasons arenít bad, but arenít particularly good either, just eh. Season 17 has been mentioned a few times as the lowest point, almost entirely due to Detective Cassidy being pretty awful in every aspect, but after that, the last 3 years have a cast that worked really well together and it was a return to mostly solid stuff.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Also, if weíre talking the original Law & Order and SVUís John Munch, you may wanna look up Homicide: Life on the Street. They crossed over two or three times during the late 90s, and while I havenít seen much of it in forever since itís not in syndication like L&O, I recall it generally being good too.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Zaroff posted:

Did they explain what his deal was? I remember there was a point made about how he seemed to have a lot more money than a cop should, driving flashy cars and so on, but don't remember any explanation as to why (IIRC there were rumours of him being paid off by the mob?)

I don't think so. When they first introduced Briscoe back in season 3, it felt like they wanted him to have a sketchy background and history. However, that seems to have been toned down fairly quickly, so while he had issues having been an alcoholic and working with seemingly dozens of corrupt officers, Lennie was generally a good cop. Fontana seemed to be them trying to go back to the sketchy character, hence his flashy aspects and odd references to whatever happened back in Chicago, but they seemed to bail on that as well.

Fontana didn't get a good introduction, and that didn't help matters, plus the whole replacing Lennie Briscoe weight. Season 15 also suffered with Southerlyn getting replaced by Borgia midway through, who was basically bland and forgettable save for her eventual fate a season later, and the Nick Falco episodes. Season 16 with Fontana and Green was better, and I think by that point they'd gotten solid, but still kinda weaker overall.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Mr Luxury Yacht posted:

While he was no Lenny I definitely thought Fontana was the best detective brought in after Orbach left. Probably helped that Dennis Farina was an IRL cop for 18 years. I think one more Green/Fontana season could have been really good, and that's not just because of how much of a wet fart Cassidy was.

I liked Fontana too. I may be misremembering things or some of the timing, but it felt like everyone absolutely hated him in season 15 when it was originally airing, and honestly it wasn't until those seasons hit syndication that I started hearing positive reactions to the character.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Maybe itís just an animated thing, or later shows copying the Simpsons because itís not just the Simpsons that still has them going to church regularly and being involved with things. Family Guy, to a lesser extent American Dad, and at least a few South Park episodes still show the various families all being involved with their church and its various events like the Simpsons. I think King of the Hill may have done so too.

Admittedly, the only live action, family-centered sitcom from the last 30 years I really remember is Married... With Children, which treated a lot of things differently than other live stuff. I donít recall them ever having episodes or scenes set in a church or involving stuff like that often like the animated shows do. All of those I can easily think of a few episodes where that stuff comes up. I donít know if poo poo like Home Improvement or Full House or whatever ever had similar things going on or not, or if that all went away from live action at a certain point.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Toshimo posted:

That 70's Show - IIRC, Kitty is the devout churchgoing mom and even tries to drag Cheech there a couple of times.

Yep. Pastor Dave is recurring character in a few seasons, and all the characters get involved in events there at least a few times.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret


I only made that connection like 3 or 4 years ago when somebody posted the video of him doing that live at the Oscars, and it blew my loving mind.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

weed cat posted:

there's a great lenny or carl line about homer running for mayor i think? "he's a great nuclear safety inspector, but i dunno how he'd do as mayor"

Trash of the Titans, where heís running for sanitation commissioner against Steve Martin.

ďHeís a great nuclear safety inspector, but I donít know if Iíd trust him with my garbage...Ē

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Mr Luxury Yacht posted:

Why anyone would ever apply to the L&O universe's fake Hudson University is beyond me. Every other week it's like "Looks like there's another multiple homicide/rape/act of biological terrorism at Hudson." That school must have the most overworked PR department in the world.

That was a joke in an episode of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt when she considered going there. All the school advertising was pictures crime scenes and ďAs seen on SVU!Ē

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Maxwell Lord posted:

There was recently a Covid fundraiser thing where the Community cast got together (virtually) and re-enacted one of their scripts with Dan Harmon on board and it was the episode where Pierce had died and they were all listening to the reading of his will. In some ways it had to be that episode because it was one episode that Chase wasn't in, but the last one that Donald Glover was in.

They also had Pedro Pascal fill in for Walton Goggins and it was hilarious.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Hattie Masters posted:

I was actually going to post about this, how both HIMYM and GoT ended so poorly that they effectively erased themselves from the cultural zeitgeist overnight. Are there any other examples of this? Where it ends and all of a sudden nobody could possibly give a poo poo?

I never watched it, but Desperate Housewives was massive for a few years and everyone knew of it, before it seemingly disappeared without a trace.

For an older one, Murphy Brown was apparently very big when it was originally airing, but faded very quickly. A lot of that seems to have been its topical, political humor dating it, and didnít get syndicated like a lot of other shows. I originally only knew of it from the Seinfeld episode where Kramer appeared as an extra, and could have easily assumed it was a fictional show.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Last Chance posted:

family guy was really mean iirc

Absurd Alhazred posted:

Is mean, it's ongoing.

Family Guy hit a point some years ago where itís painful to watch with how much they make everybody hate each other that absolutely wasnít present in their initial run or the first few years when it was revived...

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

the_steve posted:

Yeah, I feel like at this point, Family Guy is just swinging a dead cat around for the sake of seeing who it can hit.
I would almost argue that South Park is holding up better than Family Guy at this point, I mean, at least South Park puts in some effort from time to time.

South Park works a little better for me, even with the continuity seasons the last 5 or 6 years, because not every character hates every other character 95% of the time the way Family Guy seems to have gotten. South Parkís production makes it so everything is very reflective of what happened often that same week, so some of it doesnít hold up at all, but Iíd agree itís probably been better of late than most Family Guy stuff.

Solice Kirsk posted:

I like South Park. It's still funny when it focuses on little kids being little kids. But I haven't seen the last two or three seasons, so who knows.

The episodes with the kids being kids are almost always enjoyable.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

They also made an effort to get a lot of the writers from the earlier years back, which probably helped the movie be as solid as it was.

In retrospect, the Simpsons movie is only a few years removed from the show still being at a high point, although thatís a subjective and debated matter. Iíd personally argue its peak lasted until season 9 or 10, and was still generally enjoyable and good until 13-14ish, with the movie being released just after the 18th season and quality of the episodes had clearly slipped by that point.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

bobjr posted:

It has been awhile since I've actually watched That 70's show so I'm not sure how the show held up in general. It is kind of weird that we're farther away from the 90's than the show was compared to the 70's when it started.

If That 80's show didn't bomb maybe that would be a trend.

I rewatched a lot of it when Comedy Central had it in syndication a year or two ago and the first half of it holds up pretty well. I always liked the first season a bit more because I thought it used the period setting better, plus the cast still easily passed as high school kids, but the second and third seasons were really good too.

The fourth season is okay, but season five (Which IIRC starts with the California part someone else mentioned) is where they essentially start resetting everything at the beginning and end of each season so nothing develops beyond the same cycles. Itís not outright bad (Mostly), but the show just gets very repetitive from that season onward, until you get to the final season without Eric, mostly without Kelso, and the horrible Randy character and itís clear holy poo poo the show needed to be over.

Granted, I havenít watched it (Or even seen it on TV) since before all the Danny Masterson stuff really blew up, so I have no idea how rewatching it now would be, particularly some of the earlier episodes where Hyde was more of a creep...

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

sweet geek swag posted:

Someone once said that That 70's show has an episode where they are making fun of Fonz jumping the shark where the series jumps the shark. I thought that was a good way to put it.

Some quick and dirty googliní tells me that was like midway through season 4, and thatís fairly accurate.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Calaveron posted:

That 70s Show starts in '76 and ends on new year's 1980 and they still somehow manage to have five Christmas episodes, at least one of them with Eric in it when supposedly he'd be in Africa at the time.

It gets worse when you realize the first season basically covers the summer of Ď76 to summer of Ď77. Things get really compressed in there at some point where itís all stalled.

By comparison, I think M*A*S*H had like four or five episodes featuring Christmas, including the later episode that depicts the entirety of 1951, but that show generally played loose with exactly when during the Korean War it was set, to the point I think the Chinese intervention happens more than once.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

letthereberock posted:

At least one Seinfeld plot line has Jerry performing on The Tonight Show back when it was filmed in LA. The show makes it clear heís a pretty successful comedian.

Yeah, the show implies or mentions him traveling a bunch of times, including referencing several appearances on the Tonight Show. IĎm pretty sure thereís also an episode where heís performing in Atlantic City and brings George with him, and The Airport episode had him and Elaine flying back from somewhere in the Midwest where while she visited family.

letthereberock posted:

Funny thing is, when I think about people my age, Iím pretty sure I know more people who have had to live with their parents at some point during adulthood than who havenít. It just seems like a really common thing with all the economic turmoil of the past 20 years that itís weird to see it portrayed as such an awful thing, or never portrayed at all.

A big part of that is the cost of college in the 90ís and earlier compared to the last 20 years. An old recurring joke in every sitcom involving teenagers was that theyíd have to be out of the home at 18 and pay for everything themselves, which today would have radically different implications for the lifestyle theyíd have to live...

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Full time retail nowadays will very often require you to have essentially 24/7 availability, with the exact hours and days you work changing week to week to make planning any kind of life a living hell. And yes, the ď39.5Ē hours so you are technically part time and donít get benefits is also incredibly common.

Oh, and raises are maybe a quarter a year if youíre lucky. That last part always rankles me, cause Iíll see old TV shows have characters mention getting .50 cents or a dollar raise when many retail places youíll have to be employed for years to get that poo poo now. Itís almost the opposite of old movies or shows where you hear someone say they make X amount a year where it would be below the poverty line by current standards.

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Absurd Alhazred posted:

Why am I not seeing an upload date for this video?



It says Dec 16, 2010 on the YouTube app for me. :shrug:

fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Iron Crowned posted:

:lol: I have definitely worked places where discussing how much you are paid is a fireable offense listed in the employee handbook.


Drew Carey was on TBS for a long time in the late 90's/early 00's.

It was most recently on Laff (a OTA subchannel), for a few years, but it hasn't been on there for a while. It'll probably come back at some point when According to Jim, Night Court, or Home Improvement wear out their welcome in a few years.

Every retail or retail adjacent place I ever worked had the whole ďdiscussing your pay is a fireable offenseĒ included. Itís almost universal in the U.S. to my knowledge, maybe outside of union places where everyone knows the wage scale.

The Drew Carey Show, and similarly Spin City, are shows I remember airing on like TBS or TNT late at night or very early in the morning while both were still originally airing (They didnít end until 2004 and 2002, respectively, which is later than I thought either did), as well as on local WB networks prior to it switching to CW in 2006, although I canít recall either showing up much since...

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fartknocker
Oct 28, 2012

Damn it, this always happens. I think I'm gonna score, and then I never score. It's not fair.




Wedge Regret

Iron Crowned posted:

I'm pretty sure it was supposed to be a weekly infomercial for Binford Tools.

It was a vehicle to deliver pre-Baywatch Pamela Anderson to TV.

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