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leper khan
Dec 28, 2010
Honest to god thinks Half Life 2 is a bad game. But at least he likes Monster Hunter.


shame on an IGA posted:

Now that you've been told to be listening for them, you will hear at least two Goldeneye 64 SFX in some form of media or other every single day until you die.

The one that always gets me is the sonic ring pickup sound at convenience stores.

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Captain Foo
May 11, 2004

we vibin'
we slidin'
we breathin'
we dyin'


leper khan posted:

The one that always gets me is the sonic ring pickup sound at convenience stores.

yeah, this

MJBuddy
Sep 22, 2008

Now I do not know whether I was then a head coach dreaming I was a Saints fan, or whether I am now a Saints fan, dreaming I am a head coach.

Mine is the child laughing stock that was in Rollercoaster Tycoon that appears god drat everywhere.

Big K of Justice
Nov 27, 2005

Anyone seen my ball joints?


punk rebel ecks posted:

I have two questions:
- Is working as a game developer as lovely as it is perceived to be? All I see on forums and news is layoffs and crap working conditions.

It depends. It's been a good experience for me but I've worked mostly in Feature Animation and Film, and just jumped into games after 20 years. I got my lumps and hard knocks there... My first games job was Riot which isn't representative of the industry stereotype to some degree. Really good wages and benefits, really creative environment for our team at least, but I don't know about the widespread company. When I was there it was very compartmentalized between teams.

The current studio I'm at is great, really accommodating, the owner coded engines for various consoles for 2 decades and knew his poo poo, had him kick me out of my office at 6:30 pm to "go home", offers probably one of the best health care in the state, and free poo poo/bonuses galore. But my experience isn't representative.

If I ever left my current Job I'd go back to it, same with Riot, positive experience overall. I'm sorta reluctant to change jobs, unless there's people already there that I know so I can get a reading on the project/work environment.


Skwirl
May 13, 2007

The 'blood babe with the silicone chest, 200-dollar haircut, and a closet full of the latest fashions.




Big K of Justice posted:

, had him kick me out of my office at 6:30 pm to "go home",


Based on one friend who used to work in games and a couple other programmers in non games I know, that's a very good thing.

kirbysuperstar
Nov 11, 2012





Lest we forget

http://soundandthefoley.com/2013/07/22/doom-doors/

MJBuddy
Sep 22, 2008

Now I do not know whether I was then a head coach dreaming I was a Saints fan, or whether I am now a Saints fan, dreaming I am a head coach.

Skwirl posted:

Based on one friend who used to work in games and a couple other programmers in non games I know, that's a very good thing.

One of the first things I was told when I started at my company was "hey now don't work late, because we don't do overtime and if you start doing it other people will think it's okay and we don't do that here"

And I've repeated that to new hires since. I don't think that's typical at our studios but at pub level there's no reason to be around late. Just plan better or call out your deadlines. There's rare exceptions, depending on role, and usually around launches, but overall late/early days are rare and predictable exceptions, not the rule.

Ranzear
Jul 25, 2013




The Imp and Pinkie sounds too.

The one I never miss is the Chronoshift sound from C&C:Red Alert.

dads friend steve
Dec 24, 2004





Big K of Justice posted:

The current studio I'm at is great, really accommodating, the owner coded engines for various consoles for 2 decades and knew his poo poo, had him kick me out of my office at 6:30 pm to "go home",

You love to see it

Studio
Jan 15, 2008





6:30

Is this a 9 AM to 6 PM Studio? That extra hour sucks and is exhausting, imo (Also, they're all 9 hour work day studios)

Akuma
Sep 11, 2001




Studio posted:

6:30

Is this a 9 AM to 6 PM Studio? That extra hour sucks and is exhausting, imo (Also, they're all 9 hour work day studios)
I don't know about that but our studio is flexible 8.5 hours between 8 and 6.30 with an hour for lunch. We often have to kick people out at 6:30 because they'd work way too many hours if we let them.




Which they do now because everybody's working from home and there's nothing I can do to stop them

Big K of Justice
Nov 27, 2005

Anyone seen my ball joints?


Studio posted:

6:30

Is this a 9 AM to 6 PM Studio? That extra hour sucks and is exhausting, imo (Also, they're all 9 hour work day studios)

Nah its 9-5 if you want it to be. Some people come in earlier, some people come in late. I hate traffic so I usually don't come in until 10-10:30. That's usually when meetings start anyways.

Perestroika
Apr 8, 2010



So recently an indie game I'm keeping an eye on mentioned that they're using photogrammetry to make some of their models, including very prominent ones like character clothes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6zRdjB8s41M#t=30s

Now, I've hosed about with photogrammetry back in uni some years ago, and while it could produce reasonable results even back then, I remember it being kind of a pain in the rear end to set up that also required a fair bit of cleanup afterwards. I'm surprised to that it's now in a state where it can apparently be successfully used even by tiny dev studios (this game in particular is made by 2 people). Now I wonder, how common is this technology in gamedev these days overall, as opposed to making assets by hand?

Studio
Jan 15, 2008





Big K of Justice posted:

Nah its 9-5 if you want it to be. Some people come in earlier, some people come in late. I hate traffic so I usually don't come in until 10-10:30. That's usually when meetings start anyways.

Hell yeah!


Akuma posted:

I don't know about that but our studio is flexible 8.5 hours between 8 and 6.30 with an hour for lunch. We often have to kick people out at 6:30 because they'd work way too many hours if we let them.




Which they do now because everybody's working from home and there's nothing I can do to stop them

If I understand this correctly, this still kinda sucks! Give those 30 minutes back

Akuma
Sep 11, 2001




Studio posted:

Hell yeah!


If I understand this correctly, this still kinda sucks! Give those 30 minutes back
37.5 hours a week is the norm in the UK. It's very out of the ordinary to work a job in an office environment with anything else.

Studio
Jan 15, 2008





Sounds like the UK works 42.5 hours a week , and that should be lower imo

Mr Beens
Dec 2, 2006


Studio posted:

Sounds like the UK works 42.5 hours a week , and that should be lower imo

No, as Akuma said above 37.5 or 40 is the norm in the UK.
If I started somewhere with a 42.5 standard work week I would a) want to know why and b) make sure I was being paid accordingly.

Akuma
Sep 11, 2001




Studio posted:

Sounds like the UK works 42.5 hours a week , and that should be lower imo
Is that because you're counting an hour for lunch as "working"? Because I ain't working at lunch let me tell you.

Sniper Party
Feb 17, 2011

"I Guess Somebody Fixed All the Problems" -- Confused Citizen


Are you paid for your time during the lunch break? I get that the work time situation in Finland is probably a bit different than the UK or the US but the idea of being at work for 8,5 hours a day and only counting it as 37,5 hours of work per week sounds wild to me.

floofyscorp
Feb 12, 2007



You're not paid for your lunch break as standard in the UK, no.

cubicle gangster
Jun 26, 2005

magda, make the tea


I dont understand why you'd pay people to eat lunch, hang out/check their phone and do personal things. Or even how you'd start defining that without forcing everyone to take their lunch break at the exact same time every day.

In the US it's intentionally kept a little ambiguous - many work contracts say the salary is for a standard 9-6 with an hour for lunch, but covers up to 50 working hours in the week so there's some recourse against people who refuse to go even 1 minute over 40 to the extent of screwing their coworkers over.
The phrasing is so you'll do at least 40, up to 50 but i've never seen it strictly enforced in a creative studio, it's all just legal protection if someone starts to take the piss and arrives hours late while leaving on time.

Salaries arent negotiated based on an hourly rate so 37 or 42 doesn't matter.

cubicle gangster fucked around with this message at 18:18 on Jan 26, 2021

Sininu
Jan 8, 2014



Necrothatcher posted:

Hey Resident Evil 6 the only way I'm not seeing this "6" is if I literally turn my monitor off.

- Max Brightness

- Min Brightness

Why does this persist in games? I got a calibrated display and I've played whole bunch of games where if I followed that as they say the whole game will be way too dark. Never experienced one where I couldn't make the thing disappear though.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



"Listen I know we already had this conversation about the dim RTX warehouse showpiece but we didn't have time to finish the textures for that sewer area either, do you think we can step down the brightness calibration again? Last time I promise!"

Hughlander
May 11, 2005



Sininu posted:

Why does this persist in games? I got a calibrated display and I've played whole bunch of games where if I followed that as they say the whole game will be way too dark. Never experienced one where I couldn't make the thing disappear though.

My theory and I've railed against this. Artists work in dark quarters. They keep the lights off, blinds closed and their art reflects it.

VelociBacon
Dec 8, 2009



Hughlander posted:

My theory and I've railed against this. Artists work in dark quarters. They keep the lights off, blinds closed and their art reflects it.

I think in addition to this, artists are trying to create art and not always trying to design spaces that immediately present all available information to the player.

Big K of Justice
Nov 27, 2005

Anyone seen my ball joints?


Hughlander posted:

My theory and I've railed against this. Artists work in dark quarters. They keep the lights off, blinds closed and their art reflects it.

That and trying to calibrate to tv's is always fun... HDR is NTSC [never twice the same color] 2.0.

"Is it pink?Is it red? Is it salmon? Too bright? Too dark?"

Who knows?

Cue random game studios buying 16 models of tv from best buy to compare and hope for the best.

Sniper Party
Feb 17, 2011

"I Guess Somebody Fixed All the Problems" -- Confused Citizen


cubicle gangster posted:

I dont understand why you'd pay people to eat lunch, hang out/check their phone and do personal things. Or even how you'd start defining that without forcing everyone to take their lunch break at the exact same time every day.

In the US it's intentionally kept a little ambiguous - many work contracts say the salary is for a standard 9-6 with an hour for lunch, but covers up to 50 working hours in the week so there's some recourse against people who refuse to go even 1 minute over 40 to the extent of screwing their coworkers over.
The phrasing is so you'll do at least 40, up to 50 but i've never seen it strictly enforced in a creative studio, it's all just legal protection if someone starts to take the piss and arrives hours late while leaving on time.

Salaries arent negotiated based on an hourly rate so 37 or 42 doesn't matter.
Same reason you pay them for any time off or give any concessions at all: pressure from the general state of worker-employer relationships where you're located. Breaks and fair work conditions are of course also beneficial for productivity, but I guess we all know that's something the people in charge rarely consider regardless of industry or location.

The way it works practically over here is we have a set amount of hours we're supposed to work and that includes some time for breaks. Currently I work 40 hours a week, at whatever time I want to apart from having to be online and reachable between 10:00-15:00 at least (and HR would get on my case if I regularly worked significantly more than 8 hours per day). I can take breaks for lunch or taking a walk or whatever for an hour or so total every day without clocking out. Break times weren't strictly enforced even when we weren't all working from home, just if you don't get anything done and people notice you're constantly on break it might cause some questions. I've never had a job that didn't work sort of like this; break times were paid even when I was working garbage hourly jobs while at school.

Sniper Party fucked around with this message at 08:11 on Jan 27, 2021

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

This is kind of far afield, but I'm looking for some help with advertising my indie game. I purchased a consult with Rami Ismail to get advice. One of his suggestions was to run some Facebook ads targeting people who have liked games like Warning Forever or Captain Forever -- basically, arcadey ship games with lots of explosions and things breaking apart and maybe a bit of a builder element to them.

That sounds pretty reasonable, but I cannot for the life of me figure out how to target Facebook ads based on pages people have liked. As far as I can tell, all I get is an interests browser which has hopelessly broad categories like "action games", a search box to look for more narrow interests that will pull up e.g. World of Warships but not less popular games, some very basic demographics information, and then some options regarding people who have interacted with my pages, which is nobody since I just made my game's Facebook page today.

I don't suppose anyone here has advice for helping me narrow down my categories? I was hoping to target fewer than a million people with my first ad

(I don't feel like World of Warships is a particularly great match for my game; they're both naval combat games, but mine is very fast-paced, has customizable ships, is singleplayer, and has cartoony graphics, while WoW is the opposite)

Hughlander
May 11, 2005



TooMuchAbstraction posted:

This is kind of far afield, but I'm looking for some help with advertising my indie game. I purchased a consult with Rami Ismail to get advice. One of his suggestions was to run some Facebook ads targeting people who have liked games like Warning Forever or Captain Forever -- basically, arcadey ship games with lots of explosions and things breaking apart and maybe a bit of a builder element to them.

That sounds pretty reasonable, but I cannot for the life of me figure out how to target Facebook ads based on pages people have liked. As far as I can tell, all I get is an interests browser which has hopelessly broad categories like "action games", a search box to look for more narrow interests that will pull up e.g. World of Warships but not less popular games, some very basic demographics information, and then some options regarding people who have interacted with my pages, which is nobody since I just made my game's Facebook page today.

I don't suppose anyone here has advice for helping me narrow down my categories? I was hoping to target fewer than a million people with my first ad

(I don't feel like World of Warships is a particularly great match for my game; they're both naval combat games, but mine is very fast-paced, has customizable ships, is singleplayer, and has cartoony graphics, while WoW is the opposite)

https://www.facebook.com/adsmanager/audiences => Facebook Source => Faccebook Page => Include People who Meet ANY of the following Criteria => Page <Warning Forever> <Captain Forever>

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

Hughlander posted:

https://www.facebook.com/adsmanager/audiences => Facebook Source => Faccebook Page => Include People who Meet ANY of the following Criteria => Page <Warning Forever> <Captain Forever>

I had a brief moment of "holy poo poo it's going to work" but no, the "Facebook Page" source is limited to your pages. You don't appear to be able to use other peoples' pages as ad criteria unless you have appropriate permissions to those pages.

Hughlander
May 11, 2005



TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I had a brief moment of "holy poo poo it's going to work" but no, the "Facebook Page" source is limited to your pages. You don't appear to be able to use other peoples' pages as ad criteria unless you have appropriate permissions to those pages.

It should still be possible through Audiences, I may have not clicked the right part though =/

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

The language on Audiences sure sounds like it requires people to have already interacted with you: "Connect with the people who have already shown an interest in business or product with Custom Audiences" / "Reach new people who are similar to audiences you already care about" (for Custom / Lookalike audiences). That makes bootstrapping kind of difficult!

Studio
Jan 15, 2008





TooMuchAbstraction posted:

This is kind of far afield, but I'm looking for some help with advertising my indie game. I purchased a consult with Rami Ismail to get advice. One of his suggestions was to run some Facebook ads targeting people who have liked games like Warning Forever or Captain Forever -- basically, arcadey ship games with lots of explosions and things breaking apart and maybe a bit of a builder element to them.

That sounds pretty reasonable, but I cannot for the life of me figure out how to target Facebook ads based on pages people have liked. As far as I can tell, all I get is an interests browser which has hopelessly broad categories like "action games", a search box to look for more narrow interests that will pull up e.g. World of Warships but not less popular games, some very basic demographics information, and then some options regarding people who have interacted with my pages, which is nobody since I just made my game's Facebook page today.

I don't suppose anyone here has advice for helping me narrow down my categories? I was hoping to target fewer than a million people with my first ad

(I don't feel like World of Warships is a particularly great match for my game; they're both naval combat games, but mine is very fast-paced, has customizable ships, is singleplayer, and has cartoony graphics, while WoW is the opposite)

Oh my god is Rami Ismail the reason I've started getting really bad facebook ads for obscure steam games.

MJBuddy
Sep 22, 2008

Now I do not know whether I was then a head coach dreaming I was a Saints fan, or whether I am now a Saints fan, dreaming I am a head coach.

Studio posted:

Oh my god is Rami Ismail the reason I've started getting really bad facebook ads for obscure steam games.

I'm going to get my pitchfork and we'll put a stop to this!

*Starts receiving ads on Facebook for obscure indy game about leading riots out if small rural French towns*

OneEightHundred
Feb 28, 2008

Soon, we will be unstoppable!


Hughlander posted:

My theory and I've railed against this. Artists work in dark quarters. They keep the lights off, blinds closed and their art reflects it.
It's also just a bad calibration method. High-contrast edges on a dark background are visible at very low brightness levels, so you want users to calibrate the brightness so that gray level is "barely visible" and everything below it is crushed to black? Why?

Show the game world when you're adjusting brightness/contrast, anything else is a mistake.

Zaphod42
Sep 13, 2012

If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.


OneEightHundred posted:

It's also just a bad calibration method. High-contrast edges on a dark background are visible at very low brightness levels, so you want users to calibrate the brightness so that gray level is "barely visible" and everything below it is crushed to black? Why?

Show the game world when you're adjusting brightness/contrast, anything else is a mistake.

They usually have two, you calibrate for dark and then for light, so you get the limits. Then it uses that as a range. Its not so crazy.

But the examples are usually not very sensible to how the game really looks, agreed.

OneEightHundred
Feb 28, 2008

Soon, we will be unstoppable!


Even on that point, there's a fun flavor of mistake that is way more common than it should be: Games using either a screenshot or something else that's supposed to be representative of a typical in-game scene, but due to HDR, rendering discrepancies between the UI and world rendering paths, default gamma not being 1.0, or any of multiple other things, the calibration image is not actually the same brightness as the game environment.

SirDrone
Jul 23, 2013

I am so sick of these star wars

As a graduate game designer I'm finding it just hard to find work in Australia as most people want someone with more experience or tricks up their sleeve. I've been told to look into QA roles but Melbourne seems pretty scarce in that department lately.
I graduated at the end of 2018, took a gap year and then covid hit and personal stuff needed to be addressed so I'm worried I may of missed my chance to an employer seeing some slack yokel goofing off his game design and making for 3 years.

any advice for a beginner just trying to find something to do?

Akuma
Sep 11, 2001




SirDrone posted:

As a graduate game designer I'm finding it just hard to find work in Australia as most people want someone with more experience or tricks up their sleeve. I've been told to look into QA roles but Melbourne seems pretty scarce in that department lately.
I graduated at the end of 2018, took a gap year and then covid hit and personal stuff needed to be addressed so I'm worried I may of missed my chance to an employer seeing some slack yokel goofing off his game design and making for 3 years.

any advice for a beginner just trying to find something to do?
Do you have a good portfolio?

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SirDrone
Jul 23, 2013

I am so sick of these star wars

Akuma posted:

Do you have a good portfolio?

Honestly I haven't even gotten to the showing my portfolio stage, it's just been sending off CV's but I'm wondering if I'm doing the whole process wrong and should integrate a portfolio with my CV.

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