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ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



After a release, do you guys usually find yourselves trawling through reddit reading every angry comment someone has about your game, or do you just check out what the critics have to say and maybe a brief look at general opinion? Or are you just happy to be free of crunch and don't even care to see what people think?

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ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



Canine Blues Arooo posted:

Anything that's put in a loot box that affects gameplay is right out.

how do you feel about tf2's weapons drop system?

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



mutata posted:

Apropos of nothing, as a game artist, I think vanilla Team Fortress 2 has some of the most focused and successful art direction of any game ever. HOT TAKES ITT

I know that "game devs like different games than players" was touched on earlier, but are there any games that you guys find particularly exemplary for your field? Like, if you're an artist, and were teaching a class on game art or something, what games would you want to have studied? Or what games are really interesting/solid from a design perspective?

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



Once you're working a position as a junior developer or low level art person or something, how easy is moving up in the ranks? If you have talent, does that generally get recognized and someone throws you a bone and puts you in a more important position later, or do you usually have to play office politics to get anywhere?

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



How do developers feel about developing many smaller dlcs vs a few large dlc "expansion packs?"

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



Do they get amusing production names before being officially named, or is it just whatever the producer thinks is fitting

Do games ever just not get named at all until announcement, and the devs just call it "the game we're working on"

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



how much do you devs play video games? does making video games consume all your free time? do you try to "check out the competition" or do you just play whatever is fun to you?

i recall a story about how, before making the xcom remake, the xcom team at firaxis were all required to play through the original game. how often does playing other games come up at work?

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



How many professional game designers come from a specific design course or program in college, vs how many just got a compsci degree or something and ended up being better at designing than building?

What's the path to being a designer look like? An artist or a programmer could find work out of the industry, but game design seems like a very industry specific job, so it's less clear to me how I'd become one if I wanted to vs just about any other job in the industry I can think of

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



Mother posted:

Keep in mind that there are shops that go out of their way to segregate disciplines and, if you’re at one of these, migrating from something else into design will be difficult / impossible. At some places, even talking to someone not in your department is difficult.

why do they do this?

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



obviously individual preference and skill is a big factor in this question, but in general, are there any particular genres that you think are harder to make a game in than others? i imagine some genres are harder from a programmer perspective but lighter on design work, while others are vice versa, would anyone mind explaining what's uniquely difficult about making a game in the genre they're involved in/know a lot about?

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



Wallet posted:

I always wonder if people actually care about the cheating, or about the way that the cheating allows the game to get away with really poor AI. Civ's combat AI gets bagged on because it is incredibly bad at actually engaging in combat and makes up for this by having far more units than a player could ever produce, which warps the entire game from a player perspective, but if the AI managed units reasonably well and only cheated in reasonably sized armies, I'm not sure anyone would be bothered.

i mean anyone who's aware that strategy AIs cheat like nuts and ever plays a strategy game above easy difficulty has to be ok with it on some level

something of note is that making an AI that can win an FPS is pretty easy, you just make it an aimbot and it can probably wipe the floor with pretty much any human player, but obviously no one would find that fun. a strategy AI is a much different problem space, and making an AI that can win without cheating period against a competent player is near impossible, forget about trying to make it "fun" as well. it seems like it'd be best if genre was specified in AI discussions.

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



so how would you go about judging the success of the microtransaction business model?

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



In the case where the game is supposed to send "unique frame, duplicate frame, unique frame, duplicate frame" but instead sends "unique frame, unique frame, duplicate frame, duplicate frame," is it sending

"unique frame 1, unique frame 2, duplicate of frame 1, duplicate of frame 2"
or
"unique frame 1, unique frame 2, duplicate of frame 2, duplicate of frame 2"

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



Cocoa Crispies posted:

The latter; keeping frame 1 hanging around and ready to go both wastes resources and would really hurt your brain to see.

Do bugs ever happen that are a weird mess of previous frames jumbled out of order/being repeated in with current frames

Is that kind of thing immediately headache inducing to witness or is it just annoying

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



Hyper Crab Tank posted:

So, first, yes, this can happen. Doing triple buffering wrong, for example, or doing something exotic/wrong with effects like temporal antialiasing or motion blur where you need to hang on to previously rendered frames. But 1) problems like this are extremely noticeable when they happen, 2) they tend to either happen for everything in the game or not at all, and 3) it's a fundamental part of your rendering pipeline so once you've got your implementation right it doesn't show up again. Until you decide to port your engine to a new platform and you're not quite solid on all the details of that platform's rendering API and you mess up again... but it's fairly unthinkable to release with that kind of bug in your system precisely because it's so egregiously awful to look at.

It's not the kind of bug where, oh, this particular scene is handling 50% more geometry than the rest so it starts having this kind of problem. But it could happen if, say, you've got a cool new fullscreen shader effect you want to apply and that shader holds on to old framebuffers for some reason and it's only turned on in one particular scene and maybe the user has a buggy graphics driver and the game kind of shits itself and starts showing unprocessed old frames instead of new ones.

This is some pretty cool information, thanks!

I'm curious to see it in action, I'm wondering if it's just obviously a mess or if it's like, bad framerates in VR and is actively, physically painful to see

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



Why did ye olde games require an installation if they were a computer game, but console games on the game cube or playstation would just play right from the disk, no installation required

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



how big of a deal is the international market in the games you make?

is it treated as a kind of "if other countries want to buy our game that's gravy" deal or are you ever altering the game to appeal to an international audience?

as a related question, how much do different countries have different tastes in games/certain game designs? is a good game recognized as a good game pretty much everywhere, or are there certain things that can make reception to a game divided depending on the country in question?

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



are there any goons here that work in video game marketing? i've been curious what that whole side of the industry even looks like. what does the very beginning look like? do a bunch of marketing guys sit in a conference room and examine the game and identify its selling points, then go form there on how best to market that? or is marketing involved way earlier, and dictate specific selling points to the developers that they want the game to have? what kinds of specific things are game marketers generally looking out for when they're figuring out how to market a game? i feel like game marketing gets talked a lot, but the perspective of the marketer is almost never actually seen.

ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



cKnoor posted:

I can ramble on about this as a Marketing Producer at Paradox.

We usually start with reading the Game Design Document, trying to figure out what games compete for the same space and such. We have a lot of meetings so, yes some of this is done in conference rooms.
At Paradox we do not dictate selling point for the devs, however the content team (that I am part of) is on the game producers a lot to make sure that the features we need to market the game are available to us. This means things like observer modes, in game free camera through debug mode and other things we need to be able to capture gameplay. But we do share out opinions with the producers on the publishing side, and then have a lot more input on that kind of stuff. It also depends a lot on what type of publishing deal we have with the devs, internal devs are a lot closer to the marketing team, than external teams are.

There is also a lot of talk about price points and what different SKUs the game should be sold at, since the Sale team is part of Marketing, and putting together a full marketing campaign, and then following it. For me personally a lot of my time is spent making sure we have the trailers and other social content we need to follow the campaign.

Usually a marketing campaign runs up and through release, and then with expansions we make a new one.

hey man, thanks for responding! appreciate it!

what exactly is the process for making a trailer? how long does it usually take? what kind of stuff are you usually looking to put in when you're constructing/storyboarding a trailer?

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ninjewtsu
Oct 9, 2012



i always liked the way tactics ogre handled player interactivity in the narrative. there's a bunch of small dialogue options that can be "gamed" for optimal outcomes, but there's a couple Big Story Decisions that create 3ish branching paths through the story, all of which are roughly equal mechanically. so the player is more choosing what kind of story they want to see/what kind of person they want their main character to be, and i wish i knew of more games that took that kind of approach

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