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Yandat
Sep 15, 2017





The Year is 123 BC

For years the Patricians have been consolidating power. Those working the land were swept away in favor of large estates worked by slaves. Hundreds of thousands of farmers were forced to settle in Rome, where there were few opportunities. A few reformers came along.



Tiberius Gracchus became Tribune, and in this time that was the most powerful office representing the majority of the people. He was very popular. His brother, Gaius, then became Tribune and worked to expand the rights of Citizen to non-Romans.

The farmers who were forced out by huge landholders were so poor they weren't even allowed to join the army. The Gracchi brothers were intent on changing this situation and fought long and hard, and they had a lot of support from the people and even some Patricians. As popular Tribunes, they had a lot of power.

A lot of people were bribed and instigated to kill them, because this was too dangerous to the status quo and the people who were already in power.

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Yandat
Sep 15, 2017



anyway this is the general Roman History thread!

Good stuff, doesn't everyone love this?

mrbradlymrmartin
Nov 5, 2008

Tune in tune out


HAIKOOLIGAN


S V M V O M I T O R I V M O P

alsothere
Oct 14, 2014


How come Romans had like a dozen names between them? Every other famous politician and general is named Gaius or some poo poo

Ali Alkali
Apr 23, 2008


alsothere posted:

How come Romans had like a dozen names between them? Every other famous politician and general is named Gaius or some poo poo
Ancient rome only had like 30-40 forenames, some of the more famous were based on numbers; Decimus, Sextus, quinitus, octavius etc.

Typo
Aug 19, 2009






who would you vote for sulla or marius

Captain_Maclaine
Sep 30, 2001

Every moment I'm alive, I pray for death!

Typo posted:

who would you vote for sulla or marius

Optimates ad vitam!

Brother Friendship
Jul 12, 2013



alsothere posted:

How come Romans had like a dozen names between them? Every other famous politician and general is named Gaius or some poo poo

I'm dumb now but I think it's something like:

'First name' = your individual name

'Family name' = the major family you come from, ie the 'Julia' or 'Gracchi'

'Clan name' = rome originally conducted its democratic process based off 13 or something clans and gently caress if I remember any of it

So if 'Brother Friendship' is my individual name, C-Spam would be clan name and SA would be my family name. So my Roman SA handle is 'Brother Friendship Something Awful C-Spam'...or something idk

Yossarian-22
Oct 26, 2014

I like keeping our country safe.



Ali Alkali posted:

Ancient rome only had like 30-40 forenames, some of the more famous were based on numbers; Decimus, Sextus, quinitus, octavius etc.

sextus, the sex roman

nice

Brother Friendship
Jul 12, 2013



Mandatory for thread:

https://www.amazon.com/The-History-...ient+rome+fagan

Fallen Hamprince
Nov 12, 2016

BORN TO TWEET
WHITE HOUSE IS A DUMP
Fire Em All 2017
I am fat bitch
410,757,864,530 TEE SHOTS



Ali Alkali posted:

Ancient rome only had like 30-40 forenames, some of the more famous were based on numbers; Decimus, Sextus, quinitus, octavius etc.

romans had three names, a praenomen (first name), a nomen (family name) and a cognomen (nickname). the first name shortage got much worse as time went on, so that by the early empire (from 27BC) there were only a dozen in common use by most families. praenomens were also highly family-specific, some families would frequently reuse a handful. the problem made it impossible to identify individuals by the traditional praenomen-nomen scheme, so increasingly the cognomen, originally a nickname, started to be included with the other two or even supplant the praenomen; to make things more confusing, people could take multiple congomena, and they were often inherited. different people went by different configurations of names, so you have octavianus, pompey magnus, marcus aemilius lepidus, the latter of whom's father was also named marcus aemilius lepidus. During the empire, individuals enfranchised or emancipated by an emperor usually took the praenomen and nomen of that emperor, and since this usually happened en masse this made the nomen problem even worse. by the late empire many people are known soleley by cognomens and only a few ancient aristocratic families still gave their kids praenomina.

fun fact: since cognomen were nicknames, their meanings were readily apparent to contemporaries and names often sound strange when translated into english. julius caesar's name could be translated as "hairy julius", 'cicero' means 'chickpea', etc. Roman history is basically a bunch of ancient italians with names like "Fingers Mike", and "Little Antony" running around stabbing each other

Yandat
Sep 15, 2017



Caesar was like a competent Trump; a generation later after the mishaps of the original post, Caesar used the popular dissatisfaction of the Senate to overthrow the old guard. The Republic continued, but only in name from then on. The Senate still exercised power, but only in an advisory role and never over leadership.

Yinlock
Oct 21, 2008




i wish caesar would stop tweeting

Taintrunner
Apr 10, 2017

Professional Drunk




when does Kratos come into the picture

Yandat
Sep 15, 2017



Taintrunner posted:

when does Kratos come into the picture

that's Greece and they got owned by the Romans at the Battle of Thermopylae, not the gay 300 one but the one where the Romans just ran around the Macedonian Phalanx and knocked them all down with huge shields and stabbed them with short swords.

Al!
Apr 2, 2010






Typo posted:

who would you vote for sulla or marius

i probably would have been a slave

Weeping Wound
Mar 15, 2004

...what??? ???????



Yandat posted:

that's Greece and they got owned by the Romans at the Battle of Thermopylae, not the gay 300 one but the one where the Romans just ran around the Macedonian Phalanx and knocked them all down with huge shields and stabbed them with short swords.

when does Rygar come into the picture

rudatron
May 31, 2011



carthage did nothing wrong

Yandat
Sep 15, 2017



rudatron posted:

carthage did nothing wrong

they gave up all their weapons to the Romans after surrendering and then were all slaughtered while wielding half baked spears

cato was an rear end in a top hat

Xand_Man
Mar 2, 2004

If what you say is true
Wutang might be dangerous



Garret G. Fagan is definitely the name of someone who learned to prefer dead peoples over live ones in school.

Best Giraffe
Mar 1, 2012





Fallen Hamprince posted:


fun fact: since cognomen were nicknames, their meanings were readily apparent to contemporaries and names often sound strange when translated into english. julius caesar's name could be translated as "hairy julius", 'cicero' means 'chickpea', etc. Roman history is basically a bunch of ancient italians with names like "Fingers Mike", and "Little Antony" running around stabbing each other
Romans were exactly like Italian-americans, apparently???

Lawman 0
Aug 17, 2010



Best Giraffe posted:

Romans were exactly like Italian-americans, apparently???

There was a poster in the Rome A/T thread who literally believed this

Brother Friendship
Jul 12, 2013



Best Giraffe posted:

Romans were exactly like Italian-americans, apparently???

When HBO produced Rome they specifically cast extras as Italians because the show creators thought that Italians had a special arrogance in how they walked that made them more 'Roman'.

Dreddout
Oct 1, 2015

You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.


Best Giraffe posted:

Romans were exactly like Italian-americans, apparently???

Eh, I'm decimating over 'ere!

nopantsjack
Jan 7, 2008

A man about town looking for the fight of his life.

Brother Friendship posted:

When HBO produced Rome they specifically cast extras as Italians because the show creators thought that Italians had a special arrogance in how they walked that made them more 'Roman'.

But sadly for the Italians they couldn't pull off the British Roman accent

Dreylad
Jun 19, 2001


jc did nothing wrong

Brother Friendship
Jul 12, 2013



nopantsjack posted:

But sadly for the Italians they couldn't pull off the British Roman accent

Hatebag
Jun 17, 2008


Antony, cucked by Octavian, getting up in them Macedonian guts down in Alexandria. Actually i guess octavian was the cuck since he adopted tiberius.
Anyway, there's this bbc show from the 70's called "i, clavdivs" (claudius) that is a good show. The narrative framing device for one episode is a guy falling asleep while trying to poo poo, for example. Also, every episode ends with a weird dissonant brass hit that never fails to elicit a guffaw.

KomradeX
Oct 29, 2011


Lawman 0 posted:

There was a poster in the Rome A/T thread who literally believed this

Megan Mcardle?

Dreddout
Oct 1, 2015

You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.


Lawman 0 posted:

There was a poster in the Rome A/T thread who literally believed this

Rome did not have Italians, fuckwit

zeal
Sep 11, 2008

Z E A L!





i love the stories about the weird contraptions popular in the temples of rich places like alexandria and pergamum during the late hellenistic/early roman imperial periods. articulated statues hooked up to pressure plates that would pivot on their pedestals to wave at templegoers as they neared the threshold, others that would talk or produce lights through automation. the same technology was put to practical uses like the antikythera analog computer, complex war machines etc. but it's neat to see it turned to uses as benign as making the equivalent of carnival attractions for religious sites

get that OUT of my face
Feb 10, 2007

I'll get you, I'll burn you, I'll crush you, I'll flush you down, down
The toilet where you'll spiral a-round, round
Ahhhh, tick... mmm tick tick tick

i took ancient history classes for three years straight in middle school, but every time the school year ended, we'd never have enough time for rome. i'm interested in learning more through this thread

Bro Dad
Mar 26, 2010


zeal posted:

i love the stories about the weird contraptions popular in the temples of rich places like alexandria and pergamum during the late hellenistic/early roman imperial periods. articulated statues hooked up to pressure plates that would pivot on their pedestals to wave at templegoers as they neared the threshold, others that would talk or produce lights through automation. the same technology was put to practical uses like the antikythera analog computer, complex war machines etc. but it's neat to see it turned to uses as benign as making the equivalent of carnival attractions for religious sites

it's ancient six flags except instead of roller coasters you get high and contemplate the nature of mithra

C-Euro
Mar 20, 2010



Fun Shoe

The dude that does the Revolutions podcast (and who before that did an entire multi-year series on Rome's history) is coming out with a book that I believe is about this period of Roman history, I'm excited. Dan Carlin also did some Hardcore History episodes about it if you need 20+ hours of audio for something.

History is cool and if you could make any money with a history degree I might have studied that in college instead.

Yandat posted:

that's Greece and they got owned by the Romans at the Battle of Thermopylae, not the gay 300 one but the one where the Romans just ran around the Macedonian Phalanx and knocked them all down with huge shields and stabbed them with short swords.

CAESAR! *click*

zeal
Sep 11, 2008

Z E A L!





Bro Dad posted:

it's ancient six flags except instead of roller coasters you get high and contemplate the nature of mithra

there's an element of the classical mediterranean world that's often overlooked by moderns, which is that aside from cocaine (which was originally a product of the andean mountains), through extensive and continuous trade with places as far eastern as southern China the mediterranean civilizations, from the pre-Persian era through the Roman Empire, had access to most of the non-synthetic drugs we now enjoy today. i'm more familiar with roman than greek or persian drug use so that's what i'll describe

the romans didn't usually smoke their weed, though that did happen sometimes; they certainly had the glassblowing chops to make water pipes. far more popular were edible marijuana preparations: teas, and jellied hash treats analogous to modern turkish delight. poppy products, i.e. opium, were also known and used in the roman world, initially as a medical tool for pain relief like modern morphine (prescribed by no less an ancient medical authority than galen), but before too long as a recreational substance.

the india trade, through which most of these drugs arrived in the mediterranean basin, passed up the Nile from ports on the Persian Gulf, as well as mesopotamian ports in what's now southeast iraq. the india trade really dates back to the sumerians, who called the areas of modern india and pakistan they traded with melugga, and it's fair to assume that each of the kingdoms and empires that maintained control of the ports around modern basra all partook of india-raised hemp and poppy drug products

etalian
Mar 20, 2006

This avatar was paid for by the Silent Majority.

Dreddout posted:

Rome did not have Italians, fuckwit

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3yon2GyoiM

R. Mute
Jul 27, 2011



C-Euro posted:

The dude that does the Revolutions podcast (and who before that did an entire multi-year series on Rome's history) is coming out with a book that I believe is about this period of Roman history, I'm excited. Dan Carlin also did some Hardcore History episodes about it if you need 20+ hours of audio for something.
they're both bad

dan carlin especially so

Yandat
Sep 15, 2017



best Rome podcast is Fall of Rome with Patrick Wyman

Brother Friendship
Jul 12, 2013



Yandat posted:

best Rome podcast is Fall of Rome with Patrick Wyman

best twitter handle to follow for the Fall of Rome is @realdonaldtrump

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zeal
Sep 11, 2008

Z E A L!





Brother Friendship posted:

best twitter handle to follow for the Fall of Rome is @realdonaldtrump

the romans maintained a way cooler, more effective, and infinitely more stylish empire than this loving dumpster fire. even the dog days of the western empire managed to produce people like flavius aetius

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