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Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I have a question: it's not about the culture of Hollywood but it's to do with the film-making culture of another country, specifically France. Obviously France in general and the French film industry have their own #MeToo movement or equivalents, but earlier in the year I read a few news articles which described a kind of pushback against it occurring in French film which, it seems to me, is less pronounced elsewhere. Catherine Deneuve got in some controversy for such comments, for instance.

Various reasons were posited; the idea that #MeToo is considered "puritanical" in some parts of Europe, for instance; but the one that most interested me was a passing comment in a Deadline column about how it is partly a consequence of French cinema's (and, I suppose, European film in general) fixation on auteur theory; this idea that the director is the all-powerful visionary and their personal indiscretions should be tolerated even if they are being accused of rape or sexual assault, because that "warts and all" sensibility is part of what makes them great artists.

I don't know if that's an especially credible argument or not; that's what I'm curious about. In Hollywood, protecting people who prey on others seems to be more of a product of the corporate structures of most of the big production companies and studios; in other places, is there a sort of misguided "artistic" motivation to it? I certainly get that impression with, say, someone like Polanski.

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Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Polanski is like the ultimate example of what I mentioned earlier; there are people who honestly seem to believe that statutory rape is just the price of great artistry or something.

In any case, Polanski's case is strange to me because I can't understand why so many people apologised for him for so long and then seemed to turn on him almost overnight (to be clear: they should never have been on his side in the first place).It's not just a case of the Academy giving him an Oscar; the Academy represents the Hollywood establishment and we know they're mostly rotten; it's the fact that Harrison Ford personally delivered his Oscar to him and then Alec Baldwin went over did that really glowing interview with him.

Or, remember that petition that went around 10 years ago demanding that he should be released immediately? People like Whoopi Goldberg, Tilda Swinton, Asia Argento, Jonathan Demme and Martin Scorsese - all people who I'd have thought would "know better" - put their names on that. I know Natalie Portman later expressed regret for signing it because she didn't understand the case at the time (and I know that Emma Thompson initially put her name down but asked to be removed shortly afterwards) but I'm not sure if anyone else has.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


DrVenkman posted:

There's also an issue in that the French feminism movement can be... questionable at times, and some of their reaction to #metoo has been interesting to say the least.

I'm not really familiar with the French feminist movement - how would you elaborate?

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I don't really follow French news. I know the current president's wife is about 20 years older than him and people thought it was a bit of a novelty, and wasn't there one who had to quit because he assaulted a maid in a hotel?

Regardless, I'm not sure whether that points to some particular trend in French feminism. Isn't the most prominent woman in French politics the one who's like their version of Nigel Farage?

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Kurtofan posted:

that was the head of the imf, dominique strauss kahn. He wasn't president but at the time he was the frontrunner for the presidential election in the polls (that was before his candidacy was even confirmed so it could have been a much bigger shitshow somehow)

Right, I see. Was he expected to run in the most recent election or the one before it?

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Rhyno posted:

Family Guy was making Polanski jokes in its first season which might have help the public catch on a bit.

They made jokes about Spacey as well, didn't they?

I think in this season coming they're doing a #MeToo-themed episode where Quagmire gets taken to task. Who knows how that will turn out.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Krankenstyle posted:

It's a South Park crossover

Seriously?

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


And probably Weinstein as well, I shouldn't wonder.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


I hear he plans to shoot a Julian Assange movie starring himself as Julian Assange (Julian Assange will cameo playing Roman Polanski).

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Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

by FactsAreUseless


Has he got any big movies coming out? I'm not sure what his last project would've been - did he direct the last X-Men?

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