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Grem
Mar 29, 2004

b

Please probate me I took two ambien and got stuck here watching that burger pulsate and sway for 20 minutes. It's a jpg

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Drink and Fight
Feb 2, 2003

hoot, hoot, hoot, hoot hoot hoot hoot hoothoothoothoothoothoothoot hoooohootohtothotootothtoto, hoot


Grem posted:

Please probate me I took two ambien and got stuck here watching that burger pulsate and sway for 20 minutes. It's a jpg

If I could 5 a single post in this thread, this would be it.

La Brea Carpet
Nov 22, 2007

I have no mouth and I must post



Great effort, but Burgoo has nothing to do with burgers. It's a thick stew made from three meats and should be cooked in an iron kettle over an open flame

wikipedia posted:

Traditional burgoo was made using whatever meats and vegetables were available—typically, venison, squirrel, opossum, raccoon or game birds, and was often associated with autumn and the harvest season. Today, local barbecue restaurants use a specific meat in their recipes, usually pork, chicken, or mutton, which, along with the spices used, creates a flavor unique to each restaurant.

A typical burgoo is a combination of meats: pork, chicken, mutton or beef, often hickory-smoked, but other meats are seen occasionally; and vegetables, such as lima beans, corn, okra, tomatoes, cabbage and potatoes. Typically, since burgoo is a slow-cooked dish, the starch from the added vegetables results in thickening of the stew. However, a thickening agent, such as cornmeal, ground beans, whole wheat, or potato starch can be used when cooked in a non-traditional way. In addition, soup bones can be added for taste and thickening.

The ingredients are combined in order of cooking time required, with meat first, vegetables next, and thickening agents as necessary. A good burgoo is said to be able to have a spoon stand up in it. Cider vinegar, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce, or chili powder are common condiments.

legendof
Oct 27, 2014



PDP-1 posted:

Burgoo.

vonnegutt
Aug 7, 2006
Hobocamp.


PDP-1 posted:

The Verdict:
Bergoo is loving awful. To be charitable it was easy and the whole 'entire meal in one sauce' thing did kinda work in that it actually tasted like french fries with condiments on a burger. I will also admit that as a first time Bergoo cook I may have overdone the amount of fried potato flakes in proportion to the other condiments. But overall it was a weird mush of clashing tastes and while I did finish the first burger topped with Burgoo I didn't want a second one.

There's a reason nobody has ever heard of Bergoo and that reason is that it's pretty goddamn bad.

As a Kentuckian I applaud your rendition of Burgoo and will say that you absolutely captured the spirit, if not the actual ingredients, of the recipe.

10 Beers
May 21, 2005

Shit! I didn't bring a knife.



vonnegutt posted:

As a Kentuckian I applaud your rendition of Burgoo and will say that you absolutely captured the spirit, if not the actual ingredients, of the recipe.

As a fellow Kentuckian, I agree with this man.

Telsa Cola
Aug 19, 2011

No... this is all wrong... this whole operation has just gone completely sidewaysface


I got caught up in gradschool stuff so I wasnt able to do Burgoo. My take of it would have been a basically the same but I would have a sauce from the burger and tossed it in some mashed potatoes because Burgoo sounds French and that seems kinda french like?

Leviathan Song
Sep 8, 2010


I decided to do my take on Fishhead firepot. There seems to be three elements to this dish; fishheads, fire, and a pot. First I set a fire in the firepit.



Next we went down to the Asian market and bought some fishheads. The heads available were salmon so that's what I went with.

We also got some aromatics while we were there. I was in a Thai mood so we grabbed shallots, lemongrass, galangal, thai chilis, and some onions. Thai chilis should bring the other kind of fire too.

Back around the fire, the coals had died down and I grilled up the heads to add some char. I figured that would put the flavor of fire into it.


Next we cooked the aromatics, added some bamboo shoots, and then the water, tom yum paste, and fish heads.


I put the lid on with some coals and cooked it until the fish started to fall apart.

Here is the final result.

The verdict? It was ok but a bit bland. I think it would've been better with a stronger fish like mackerel.

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

That's awesome.

Also, what's wrong with your dog? It's running around the backyard and completely ignoring a trio of fish heads. Wouldn't that be, like, the most amazing smelling thing ever to a dog?

Hirayuki
Mar 28, 2010


College Slice

ExecuDork posted:

Also, what's wrong with your dog? It's running around the backyard and completely ignoring a trio of fish heads. Wouldn't that be, like, the most amazing smelling thing ever to a dog?
Maybe with a stronger fish, like mackerel.

(Looks tasty! I agree it'd be great with mackerel, but I'm nuts about mackerel.)

Leviathan Song
Sep 8, 2010


ExecuDork posted:

That's awesome.

Also, what's wrong with your dog? It's running around the backyard and completely ignoring a trio of fish heads. Wouldn't that be, like, the most amazing smelling thing ever to a dog?

We've got a theory that he's the reincarnation of an old Indian man. He won't touch raw meat but loves curry powder.

ToxicFrog
Apr 26, 2008



I just learned about Pink Stuff and now I want to know what someone who hasn't had their innocence shattered thinks it is.

Leviathan Song posted:

Here is the final result.

The verdict? It was ok but a bit bland. I think it would've been better with a stronger fish like mackerel.

Holy poo poo would. That looks amazing and I bet it smelled fantastic.

RandomPauI
Nov 24, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Pookah shared the Boyld Brawne with us in another thread, along with this catchphrase. "A brawny Churchman makes a hearty meal."

Technically there's no way we could recreate the recipe in a timely manner, even if we wanted to. But it sounds perfect as a cooking challenge prompt.

Cavenagh
Oct 9, 2007

Grrrrrrrrr.

Glorified Rice

I've no idea what Glorified Rice is. It could be a mangling of a term (such as how Refried Beans were once Refined Beans), a total lie, or a poetical name. I went with the idea of taking rice and trying to make it special without losing the riceness of the rice. I had a small party coming up, eight adults, two under fours, two under twos and a four month old, where I had to cook food that all ages would be happy eating. So I chose to Glorify a Rice Pudding.

(no pictures of each step as I had to cook, childwatch and drink)

Started by infusing a mix of coconut milk and half & half with vanilla beans and a couple of cloves.



Toasted some short grain rice. Fished out the vanilla pods and clove er, whatever the part of the plants they are, and add the toasted rice to the liquid.


Leave it to cook on low, stirring and topping up the liquid with milk when necessary.

Meanwhile, garnishes. To Glorify Rice I thought needed a two pronged approach. Firstly to make the best of the rice and cook it with a lot of flavour. The spices I chose along with toasting the rice and using coconut milk meant that the rice was going (if done properly) with a winter warming tone. So I wanted garnish that would counter that., perk it all up.

Firstly some crunch. A touch of textural contrast with some flavour. A little bit of kitchen science helped me make a Golden Syrup Honeycomb, that I broke up using a toddler and a rolling pin.

(It proved very popular amongst the adults)

Cheating on the next garnish as I had it hanging around from a previous dessert. Cardamom Parfait. Cold creamy contrast.

(Outside the USA a parfait is a smooth frozen mousse. )

Fruits. Unpictured is some diced mango that I soaked in lime juice, acid and the King of Fruit enriching the rice pudding. And some Starfruit. Because who doesn't want to eat a star? Isn't that a glorious idea. I wanted to give them a spray of rum but apparently this could have lead to drunk children, and then who would drive?


To serve. Season the Rice Pudding to taste using brown sugar. Top with garnishes of Honeycomb, Star Fruit, Mango, Cardamom Parfait Spheres (I've got a melon baller and I'm going to use it.) and Gold.


Gold Glorious Gold

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

500 CIGARETTES!


That looks extremely glorified, 10/10.

cigaw
Sep 13, 2012


Cavenagh posted:

Glorified Rice
To serve. Season the Rice Pudding to taste using brown sugar. Top with garnishes of Honeycomb, Star Fruit, Mango, Cardamom Parfait Spheres (I've got a melon baller and I'm going to use it.) and Gold.
I wish I could vote 5 all over again.

Phanatic
Mar 13, 2007

Please don't forget that I am an extremely racist idiot who also has terrible opinions about the Culture series.


Cavenagh posted:

Glorified Rice

I've no idea what Glorified Rice is. It could be a mangling of a term (such as how Refried Beans were once Refined Beans),

Bwuh?

Frijoles refrito does not mean Refined Beans.

That does look really loving good though.

La Brea Carpet
Nov 22, 2007

I have no mouth and I must post


Can you come to my local Thai/sushi joint and teach them that. Miles better than any dessert they have. Excepting Thai tea of course.

legendof
Oct 27, 2014



I... Might make (something like) that tonight, that looks amazing.

Rollersnake
May 9, 2005

Please, please don't let me end up in a threesome with the lunch lady and a gay pirate. That would hit a little too close to home.

Unlockable Ben

Cavenagh posted:

Glorified Rice

Okay, that has to be the best one so far. It looks absolutely delicious, and surprisingly close to the actual dish (as far as being a creamy rice dessert with fruit, anyway).

Edit: Has anyone suggested cowboy caviar yet? I think that would be a fun one.

Rollersnake fucked around with this message at Jan 30, 2018 around 02:50

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

Phanatic posted:

Bwuh?
Frijoles refrito does not mean Refined Beans.
The story I heard, long ago, is that the English term "refried beans" came via a mangled translation of the Spanish "frijoles refrito" into French - "refri-[something]" ended up in English as "re-fried". The English name implies the beans have been cooked twice but of course they haven't unless you (the consumer) decides to do so. But it's a wide-spread misconception.

Also, more importantly, Glorified Rice is a goddam masterwork. Absolutely could not be better - the use of gold and especially the use of a toddler as a kitchen tool really pushed it over the top. loving fantastic.

\/\/\/ makes sense. The translation might have come through as "fried fried" which somebody shortened to "refried".

ExecuDork fucked around with this message at Jan 30, 2018 around 15:55

Lutha Mahtin
Oct 10, 2010

Here I post;
I can do no other.


ExecuDork posted:

The story I heard, long ago, is that the English term "refried beans" came via a mangled translation of the Spanish "frijoles refrito"

the word "frito" (or "frita") is the Spanish word for "fried" in adjective form. the literal translation of "frijoles refritos" is "refried beans" actually Wikipedia says refrito means "well fried" but again it definitely doesn't mean "refined"

Lutha Mahtin fucked around with this message at Jan 30, 2018 around 15:50

Elephanthead
Sep 11, 2008




Toilet Rascal

I would drink refined beans.

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Claiming "Refined Beans" for after my wedding.

I only hope that I can live up to the fantastic Glorified Rice. Incredible.

I will definitely also be using gold, as I will have a good bit left over after making my wedding cake.

empty whippet box
Jun 9, 2004
A perfectly acceptable Southern gentleman


I'd really like to see the OP take a crack at Boudin Balls.

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Already know VERY well what those are. Far too well... Added to the list for someone else to take a crack at. Updated 4 pages worth of backlog while I was at it!

If you made a dish, claimed a dish, or suggested a dish and don't see it in the correct section of the OP, send me a PM and I'll get to it when I can.

Dr. Kloctopussy
Apr 22, 2003


refried beans are hella refried, they are the leftover whole beans from yesterday cooked down with lard into delicious mush.

JacquelineDempsey
Aug 6, 2008

It's a horrible name for anything really but especially a shirt.


Gotta say, the gold made me cringe because my only experience eating pieces of metal is when you accidentally get a bit of tin foil from a hastily unwrapped baked potato or somesuch in a bite, and it's like Zeus has decided to curse my teeth with holy and extremely painful lightning. I guess gold leaf doesn't do that?

Otherwise, though 10/10 on that one, nice job. Absolutely would (except maybe the gold leaf, I dunno).

Also: I haven't forgotten my commitment to hand cheese with music! I just got crazy busy and broke around the holidays. And now all y'all have really stepped up the game; I thought I had a great creative idea but now I'm intimidated by the contributions.

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Oh poo poo, also! ExecuDork!!!!!

I had totally missed your entry for Doom Rooster. I am VERY proud to have a stout-marinated chicken, with coffin-shaped potatoes as my foodified name. Awesome job, and I would eat the heck out of that.

Edit:

JacquelineDempsey posted:



Also: I haven't forgotten my commitment to hand cheese with music! I just got crazy busy and broke around the holidays. And now all y'all have really stepped up the game; I thought I had a great creative idea but now I'm intimidated by the contributions.


To hell with that. ! Some of the best posts, are the laziest. Also, creativity counts for much more than skill/expense of execution.

Doom Rooster fucked around with this message at Jan 30, 2018 around 19:31

ExecuDork
Feb 25, 2007

We might be fucked, sir.

Fallen Rib

Hey, I'm glad you liked your namesake dish. I plan to take another crack at if I can get ahold of an actual balls-inside rooster* to roast. And because stout is good. And like I said before, would do Halloween in January (or any month) again.

Seconding the hell-with-that-just-post to JD and everybody else, I love this thread so goddam much and I want to see what you do with these things.

* I have a possibility in mind, and a backup plan if that doesn't work out. I won't be able to attempt either for many months, though.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


War. War never changes.



Fun Shoe

As an update on the sonofabitch sauce, it's still fermenting.

Smells real good in my kitchen just now.

Samizdata
May 14, 2007


Liquid Communism posted:

As an update on the sonofabitch sauce, it's still fermenting.

Smells real good in my kitchen just now.

Frag. I WASN'T hungry before...

Friend
Aug 3, 2008



Rollersnake posted:

Edit: Has anyone suggested cowboy caviar yet? I think that would be a fun one.

Oooh dibs. I might not get to this until next week though so if someone wants to jump in and snag it, that's okay too

effika
Jun 19, 2005
Birds do not want you to know any more than you already do.

Friend posted:

Oooh dibs. I might not get to this until next week though so if someone wants to jump in and snag it, that's okay too

Ooh, that reminds me I need pick up stuff to make cowboy caviar this weekend. But I know what it is so I am eager to see what you come up with!

Dylan16807
May 12, 2010


JacquelineDempsey posted:

Gotta say, the gold made me cringe because my only experience eating pieces of metal is when you accidentally get a bit of tin foil from a hastily unwrapped baked potato or somesuch in a bite, and it's like Zeus has decided to curse my teeth with holy and extremely painful lightning. I guess gold leaf doesn't do that?

Otherwise, though 10/10 on that one, nice job. Absolutely would (except maybe the gold leaf, I dunno).

Also: I haven't forgotten my commitment to hand cheese with music! I just got crazy busy and broke around the holidays. And now all y'all have really stepped up the game; I thought I had a great creative idea but now I'm intimidated by the contributions.

Do you have metal fillings or something that the foil was reacting with? In that case I'm not sure, but the thing about gold leaf is that it's about 200 times thinner than aluminum foil and barely exists before folding away into nothing.

Cavenagh
Oct 9, 2007

Grrrrrrrrr.

Dylan16807 posted:

Do you have metal fillings or something that the foil was reacting with? In that case I'm not sure, but the thing about gold leaf is that it's about 200 times thinner than aluminum foil and barely exists before folding away into nothing.

The gold leaf was intangible. No flavour, no texture. Just dissolves away to nothing. Aside from ostentation / looks, it has nothing to add to a dish. Little bit of fun though.

Thanks for the enthusiasm. It was well received, convincing a couple of people that they might actually like rice pudding. And having now looked up Glorifed Rice, oh, Minnesota.

(I did get caught by the old Refried = Refined. Whoops)

pidan
Nov 6, 2012



Cavenagh posted:

Glorified Rice

Gold Glorious Gold

This is amazing


Leviathan Song posted:

I decided to do my take on Fishhead firepot. There seems to be three elements to this dish; fishheads, fire, and a pot. First I set a fire in the firepit.



The verdict? It was ok but a bit bland. I think it would've been better with a stronger fish like mackerel.

This is great too, and while the process is quite different, the result is really close to the original dish.

So the fishhead is pretty self explanatory. Chinese people like eating these, whereas in Europe fish is generally sold without the head.

The fire-pot (huo3guo1 火鍋) is a bit less obvious, and I'm not sure what exactly the "fire" part refers to. It's basically a spicy soup that boils on the table on a heating element, and the people sitting around it drop in various meats and vegetables to cook. When they're done you fish them out and eat them, kind of like in fondue except you don't really know which is yours, unless everybody has their own little pot, which is a variation that does exist but not with the fishheads for reasons I shall get into.
It's normally called hotpot in English.

This is a typical Sichuan hotpot:


It's mostly water with a large amount of chili oil and other spices.

This is a variety you get in north China, with a more "white soup" taste and heated by a cylinder of burning coals instead of a gas stove / electro plate. You can see the various drop-in ingredients next to it:



It's also pretty common to have both red and white soup, in a pot that has two compartments in a yin-yang shape.

All of these varieties exist with fish heads added. There's also hotpot where a whole fish is in it, which will soften as it's cooking and eventually you can pull pieces off the meat with your chopsticks. The fish heads follow the same principle, except they apparently taste even better. You can either put one really big fishhead (around the big lakes) or a number of smaller fishhead. I don't know if the species makes a difference.

I like this picture, the fish look so mournful:


The pictures I found by googling the English term always seem to de-emphasize the fish head, I can't imagine why.

Leviathan Song
Sep 8, 2010


pidan posted:

This is amazing


This is great too, and while the process is quite different, the result is really close to the original dish.

So the fishhead is pretty self explanatory. Chinese people like eating these, whereas in Europe fish is generally sold without the head.

The fire-pot (huo3guo1 火鍋) is a bit less obvious, and I'm not sure what exactly the "fire" part refers to. It's basically a spicy soup that boils on the table on a heating element, and the people sitting around it drop in various meats and vegetables to cook. When they're done you fish them out and eat them, kind of like in fondue except you don't really know which is yours, unless everybody has their own little pot, which is a variation that does exist but not with the fishheads for reasons I shall get into.
It's normally called hotpot in English.

This is a typical Sichuan hotpot:


It's mostly water with a large amount of chili oil and other spices.

This is a variety you get in north China, with a more "white soup" taste and heated by a cylinder of burning coals instead of a gas stove / electro plate. You can see the various drop-in ingredients next to it:



It's also pretty common to have both red and white soup, in a pot that has two compartments in a yin-yang shape.

All of these varieties exist with fish heads added. There's also hotpot where a whole fish is in it, which will soften as it's cooking and eventually you can pull pieces off the meat with your chopsticks. The fish heads follow the same principle, except they apparently taste even better. You can either put one really big fishhead (around the big lakes) or a number of smaller fishhead. I don't know if the species makes a difference.

I like this picture, the fish look so mournful:


The pictures I found by googling the English term always seem to de-emphasize the fish head, I can't imagine why.

Awesome. I'm tempted to try it again from an actual recipe. Those look tasty.

Tunicate
May 15, 2012





Sauce Arachide Ivorienne au poulet

Ivory spider sauce on chicken.

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PT6A
Jan 5, 2006

500 CIGARETTES!


Tunicate posted:

Sauce Arachide Ivorienne au poulet

Ivory spider sauce on chicken.

You've, uh, made an error in your translation. Unless that's part of the joke and I'm not getting it?

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