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Glare Seethe
May 15, 2004

Tenochtitlan, looking east.


Thanks for the rundown! Sounds like The Technomancer is a good place to start, though it's the newest so I'll have to dig around and see if my computer could handle it. If not maybe I'll aim for Mars War Logs instead. It does kind of sound like they're all worth a look in one way or another, though, which is fitting for this thread.

edit: The RPS review for Bound By Flame basically nails what this thread is about :

quote:

Bound By Flame is the kind of game that always lights a spark of hope in even the most cynical reviewer Ė the kind that, while visibly running on a low budget and very unlikely to seriously threaten the big guns in its chosen genre, has the potential to surprise. To excite. To come out of nowhere and stick in the mind more effectively than something more polished and heralded could do with a thousand expensive advertising campaigns.

Now, sadly this one specifically doesnít do that, but you probably guessed that already. It is at least interesting though, partly because of itself and partly despite.

...

As juvenile as it all is, thereís a raw enthusiasm to it too. Itís trying to be a bit different, and Iíd rather have that than yet another endlessly stuck up bit of high-fantasy claptrap that thinks putting elves and dwarves into a slightly different field is enough to create an original setting.

Glare Seethe fucked around with this message at Jan 19, 2018 around 08:03

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Kibayasu
Mar 28, 2010



Of them the ones I played, I'd say Bound By Flame is the one that offers the least. That crafting system I mentioned does not go very far in off-setting the rest of its problems.

OutOfPrint
Apr 9, 2009


I actually liked Bound By Flame, but, yeah, the difficulty was all over the place, and it's obviously a low budget production. In games like this, I like a sarcastic protagonist more than a blank slate, gruff guy, so the game's protagonist going "HEY DID YOU SEE ME KILL THAT BIG loving DEMON?!" after the first boss was endearing.

The Technomancer is definitely the best of their open-ish world games, though. I just really wish there was a decent fast travel system for it, because the setting is huge and a lot of the missions are "visit this guy on one side of the map, then talk to someone else on the other." Realizing that about half of my play time was just walking from one objective to another with nothing to break up the monotony killed it for me.

Spiders games are so close to being great that they all wind up frustrating to me. I always feel like I get my money's worth out of them, but never feel entirely satisfied by them.

Zamboni Apocalypse
Dec 29, 2009


James Woods Fan posted:

7.62 High Calibre

For maximum jank you really want to add the Mercapocalypse and Blue Sun mods, and experience the joys of CTDs because of mechant inventories being ridiculously overloaded ("How many AK variants you want?" "ALL" "Say no more."), magazine loot items becoming porn mags of various levels of , slavery (non-perverted, surprisingly enough) and some really atrocious racist/sexist dialogues, quests and characters.

(Also removes the Gyrojet. )

Vanilla has plenty of jank, including enemies clipping through walls and stairs, mistranslations from the original Russian (including, IIRC, the ammo type for one rare shotgun), bad writing in the first place (but not Blue Sun bad) and the "spawn in many enemies ten seconds after you arrive, using the same zone entry" legacy tactic from the preceding game, Brigade E5.

(If purchased on Steam, do not use the "Hard Life" version, which is a mistranslation of the original Russian title of "gently caress you up the rear end sideways with a rusty chainsaw on fire... OK, now that you finished the tutorial we play for real".)

Tactijank Honorable Mention: Silent Storm ("Excuse me while my dieselpunk power armor stealths up directly in front of you and gibs you with my MechaHanzo steel.")(Protip: snipe every barrel, gas cannister and fuel tank immediately.)

dr.acula
May 9, 2009



Would I be correct in thinking the DragonBall Xenoverse games are janky as hell?

Dog Kisser
Mar 30, 2005

But People have fears that beasts do not. Questions, too.


Does Graffiti Kingdom count? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ep2TYh4zh7k
A weird, pretty terrible action-platformer where the gimmick is you can draw your own creatures to play as. You draw bodies, arms, eyes, guns, whatever, then tell the game what each of them should do. It was really easy to make terrible crap like the video shows. But, like with any game where you can create stuff, you could go crazy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ED9GCuMFZDs
I played the poo poo out of this game in highschool, I'd bring it to parties and we'd make monsters and laugh. My favorite was Dr. Cocktopus, a fat doctor with... appendages growing off his back that were set as cannons so they'd shoot fireballs. Someone asked if they could be set as legs instead, so we did, and died laughing as he walked around like a demented dong-spider.

It was great.

SolidSnakesBandana
Jul 1, 2007

Infinite ammo


dr.acula posted:

Would I be correct in thinking the DragonBall Xenoverse games are janky as hell?

Its kind of an evolution of the Tenkaichi Budokai series, if you've ever played those. In some ways its a step back, in others a step forward.

popewiles
Jan 8, 2006

Just chillin' in the sink

StrixNebulosa posted:

Yeeees if there's anything I hate about Paradox games it is their treatment of cheevos.

Paradox games are the only ones where I care about getting achievements due to their treatment of them.

RBA Starblade
Apr 27, 2008

Going Home.


Dog Kisser posted:

Does Graffiti Kingdom count? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ep2TYh4zh7k
A weird, pretty terrible action-platformer where the gimmick is you can draw your own creatures to play as. You draw bodies, arms, eyes, guns, whatever, then tell the game what each of them should do. It was really easy to make terrible crap like the video shows. But, like with any game where you can create stuff, you could go crazy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ED9GCuMFZDs
I played the poo poo out of this game in highschool, I'd bring it to parties and we'd make monsters and laugh. My favorite was Dr. Cocktopus, a fat doctor with... appendages growing off his back that were set as cannons so they'd shoot fireballs. Someone asked if they could be set as legs instead, so we did, and died laughing as he walked around like a demented dong-spider.

It was great.

I played this! I tried to make Kirby in it, then when Kirby started animating he collapsed in on himself every "breath".

e: Wait no I played something like it I think

Baron Snow
Feb 7, 2007



You might be thinking of Magic Pengel, which Graffiti Kingdom was sorta a sequel to.

unimportantguy
Dec 25, 2012

Maybe she has no parents and was raised by dogs?

Acquire's Way of the Samurai is a series of dumb, janky games full of stupid AI, questionable writing and translation, and some really, really bad voice acting. The nicest thing I can say about the physics on display in the games is "sometimes it's hilarious." The games are, by design, a complete pain in the rear end on the first playthrough, and a large number of grindy playthroughs are necessary to get anywhere, especially on higher difficulties. Many key mechanics are obscured from the player, or poorly-explained.

At the same time as I say all this, I also have to say that the Way of the Samurai games have been personal favorites of mine ever since the first one debuted on PS2 back in 2002. From the moment you start a Way of the Samurai game, you are given almost no direction. You're just a wandering ronin come into town, with an open map in front of you, and you can do whatever you want. Want to join the local yakuza gang? Sure, why not. Stand up for the downtrodden peasants? Of course. Be a bloodthirsty duelist who's only out for themselves? A classic choice. Forge the ultimate sword? Be my guest. Be a mute weirdo who refuses to engage in conversations? Totally an option. Run around naked bumping into people and weirding everyone out while constantly swilling cheap booze and putting your foot in your mouth at every turn in conversations? Now we're talking.

Each of the Way of the Samurai games is brimming with different storylines to explore, different characters to get to know, and ultimately, different endings to pursue. For me, part of the joy of these games is pushing at the boundaries of the various stories, finding where the seams are, and being surprised by the variety of situations that the developers thought to include.

There are currently four main series Way of the Samurai games and one spinoff, Samurai Western. Way of the Samurai 3 and 4 are available on Steam, though I personally prefer the first two games, which were on PS2. Any of them are worth checking out, though.

girth brooks part 2
Sep 6, 2011

Bush did 911


Fun Shoe

unimportantguy posted:

Acquire's Way of the Samurai is a series of dumb, janky games full of stupid AI, questionable writing and translation, and some really, really bad voice acting. The nicest thing I can say about the physics on display in the games is "sometimes it's hilarious." The games are, by design, a complete pain in the rear end on the first playthrough, and a large number of grindy playthroughs are necessary to get anywhere, especially on higher difficulties. Many key mechanics are obscured from the player, or poorly-explained.

At the same time as I say all this, I also have to say that the Way of the Samurai games have been personal favorites of mine ever since the first one debuted on PS2 back in 2002. From the moment you start a Way of the Samurai game, you are given almost no direction. You're just a wandering ronin come into town, with an open map in front of you, and you can do whatever you want. Want to join the local yakuza gang? Sure, why not. Stand up for the downtrodden peasants? Of course. Be a bloodthirsty duelist who's only out for themselves? A classic choice. Forge the ultimate sword? Be my guest. Be a mute weirdo who refuses to engage in conversations? Totally an option. Run around naked bumping into people and weirding everyone out while constantly swilling cheap booze and putting your foot in your mouth at every turn in conversations? Now we're talking.

Each of the Way of the Samurai games is brimming with different storylines to explore, different characters to get to know, and ultimately, different endings to pursue. For me, part of the joy of these games is pushing at the boundaries of the various stories, finding where the seams are, and being surprised by the variety of situations that the developers thought to include.

There are currently four main series Way of the Samurai games and one spinoff, Samurai Western. Way of the Samurai 3 and 4 are available on Steam, though I personally prefer the first two games, which were on PS2. Any of them are worth checking out, though.

I played the absolute hell out of the first one, and decent amount of 4 as well. 4 especially had a fairly robust character customization system.



That was my character on my last play through. She's not wearing horns the entire back of her head is a demon face. Her clothing is made almost entirely of various masks I got in the game, and the big frilly thing in the back was a tiny hair clip to give you an idea of the kinds of things you can do with it.

OutOfPrint
Apr 9, 2009


After beating Elex, I decided to go back in time to Gothic 3. I haven't played it in years and got it for dirt cheap on sale, so what the hell.

Compared to Elex, Gothic 3 is a breeze. Combat seems to come down to stunlocking enemies before they stunlock me, and other enemies in a group are courteous enough to wait their turns before attacking in a series of 1-on-1 duels. This has the odd effect of making the protagonist feel like a badass swordsman, which is kind of neat.

Way of the Samurai 3 and 4 might be next on my list to replay after my Piranha Bites kick. They're bad in the best ways.

anilEhilated
Feb 17, 2014

But I say fuck the rain.


OutOfPrint posted:

Compared to Elex, Gothic 3 is a breeze. Combat seems to come down to stunlocking enemies before they stunlock me, and other enemies in a group are courteous enough to wait their turns before attacking in a series of 1-on-1 duels. This has the odd effect of making the protagonist feel like a badass swordsman, which is kind of neat.
Just wait for the magic-using enemies to start showing up. If you can't wait, head for the southern parts of the world.

Those loving liches.

Glare Seethe
May 15, 2004

Tenochtitlan, looking east.


I have an excuse to bump this thread since I just played through something called Dogolrax. It's a gleefully strange game in pretty much everything - art, narrative, gameplay - but never in an obnoxious way. To me it comes across as genuine weirdness. The actual gameplay keeps changing, sometimes it's a platformer, sometimes a shmup, sometimes a side-scrolling exploration game, but it kinda remains janky throughout - the controls are often too sensitive and the hitboxes too big, for instance, which leads to a lot of deaths (but there's instant restart, though sometimes from too far back).

Took me about two hours to go through it but there's some bonus stuff I didn't do and I got the impression there may be alternate paths throughout (there are areas where you are explicitly given the option to pick between an Easy path and a Hard one, but I actually mean aside from those).

It has that kind of carefree 'vision first' attitude that a lot of the games in this thread share.

StandardVC10
Feb 6, 2007

\ HELLO /


Buglord

I'd like to submit FEAR: Perseus Mandate. The second of two expansion packs for the original FEAR, and definitely the wonkiest. I think the lighting engine is actually broken on like three quarters of the maps. The only explanation I can think of for the textures is that the lead artist quit halfway through the project. The story is kind of incoherent and the voice acting is provided by Steven Blum and like three other guys all trying their best to sound like him. At one point they unironically use the word "shenanigans."

It's still fun as hell, though. While kind of stupid, the story at least conveys a sense of progress and agency, which can't be said of some of the other FEAR games. The original FEAR had some of the best gunplay of any shooter I've played, and Perseus Mandate manages to keep it more or less intact. They also add these elite dudes on PCP who climb up the walls on their fingernails and hock two grenades at you simultaneously, which makes the slow-mo power much more worthwhile. And you can use the dual pistols for pretty much the whole game, which you couldn't in the original due to ammunition scarcity. The dual pistols are rad as hell so this is a major improvement.

In conclusion, messy but fun beats polished but tedious (my experience with FEAR 2 and the other FEAR expansion pack.)

RBA Starblade
Apr 27, 2008

Going Home.


StandardVC10 posted:

I'd like to submit FEAR: Perseus Mandate. The second of two expansion packs for the original FEAR, and definitely the wonkiest. I think the lighting engine is actually broken on like three quarters of the maps. The only explanation I can think of for the textures is that the lead artist quit halfway through the project. The story is kind of incoherent and the voice acting is provided by Steven Blum and like three other guys all trying their best to sound like him. At one point they unironically use the word "shenanigans."

It's still fun as hell, though. While kind of stupid, the story at least conveys a sense of progress and agency, which can't be said of some of the other FEAR games. The original FEAR had some of the best gunplay of any shooter I've played, and Perseus Mandate manages to keep it more or less intact. They also add these elite dudes on PCP who climb up the walls on their fingernails and hock two grenades at you simultaneously, which makes the slow-mo power much more worthwhile. And you can use the dual pistols for pretty much the whole game, which you couldn't in the original due to ammunition scarcity. The dual pistols are rad as hell so this is a major improvement.

In conclusion, messy but fun beats polished but tedious (my experience with FEAR 2 and the other FEAR expansion pack.)

I like how every FEAR game is about Alma and the Pointman from FEAR 1 despite the whole premise being that they investigate a whole lot of weird poo poo and there are a bunch of FEAR teams. By the end of 3 the city is hosed to hell and you kind of just wonder if the other teams are just as bad at their jobs and everything in the world's just constantly about to collapse on itself because the team in New Mexico didn't do a good enough job dealing with the chupacabras and now FEAR New Jersey is reporting that the Jersey Devil opened a portal to hell again.

Kibayasu
Mar 28, 2010



RBA Starblade posted:

I like how every FEAR game is about Alma and the Pointman from FEAR 1 despite the whole premise being that they investigate a whole lot of weird poo poo and there are a bunch of FEAR teams. By the end of 3 the city is hosed to hell and you kind of just wonder if the other teams are just as bad at their jobs and everything in the world's just constantly about to collapse on itself because the team in New Mexico didn't do a good enough job dealing with the chupacabras and now FEAR New Jersey is reporting that the Jersey Devil opened a portal to hell again.

So Cabin in the Woods but for first person shooters.

Junk
Dec 20, 2003

It's disgraceful - us being forced to pick wood for our smuggler-ancestors beacon-fires!


Silent Hill 4. A lot of people think this game is awful, and by most metrics I'd say that's a fair opinion. The controls are clunky, the lighting system is a regression for a series known for being an early pioneer of dynamic shadows, the textures are low-res even for 2004, and it has burping nurses. To this game's credit though, it has a really creepy story, does an absolutely fantastic job of making you feel isolated and claustrophobic, and has some of my favorite ambient sound design in the whole series (burping nurses aside). It is the one Silent Hill game I replay the most and it is criminally underappreciated.

EDIT: I forgot to mention my favorite part of this game, which is that it nails its premise, that you are living inside of a perpetual nightmare. The puzzles and environments all seem to operate on this hazy dream logic, and the dialogue from the other characters sound just "off" enough that nothing really seems real. It's a great example of a game that has a lot going on conceptually that shines through the bad.

Junk fucked around with this message at Feb 9, 2018 around 02:01

Kaboom Dragoon
May 7, 2010

The greatest of feasts

As mentioned earlier, the EDF series is not the greatest in terms of gameplay, but it's just so earnest about it all, it's difficult not to get swept up in the enthusiasm. As silly as the premise is, it's never once played for ironic laughs, and the seriousness of it all just endears it to me.

Manhunt is infamous for many, many reasons. At the time, it was written off as gratuitous shock horror, Rockstar trading on their image of being the 'bad boys' of the game industry, and it's safe to say time hasn't exactly vindicated it as an underground classic. That said, it's also one of the tensest games I've ever played. Hiding in the shadows as several enemies hunt you down, forcing you to rethink your strategy, set the pulse racing like few other games I've played. The original PS2 release was one of the few games to support headset input: any time you got a call from the director responsible for your torment, it came in through the earpiece. You could use the mic to shout as well, attracting enemies to your position. It also meant that an errant cough or dog bark would mean your rear end was toast.

Manhunt 2, however, was an unmitigated piece of poo poo. Never play that.

OutOfPrint
Apr 9, 2009


Keeping on with my Piranha Bites kick, I quit Gothic 3 and am 2/3's through the Risen games. For anyone who hasn't played them, they're pirate themed fantasy open world RPGs that absolutely belong in this thread.

The first is the least piratical, and it's clear that Piranha Bites was still working out the setting details. The second feels unfinished, with the shortest playtime of the three and clearly unfinished game mechanics, but the setting really comes into its own in this one and has the best excuse for the hero of the first game to lose his abilities: he went on a multi-year bender trying to forget the events of the first game. The third brings in a new protagonist, the brother of an NPC in the first two games, and is the best of the bunch to the point where Elex, Piranha Bites' next game, feels like a game design step backward.

Playing these consecutively, it's really neat how tightly the world was scripted. Characters recur through the entire series, events are referenced through each game. What's even more interesting are the things they clearly jettisoned. Faranga, the island the first game was entirely set on, was destroyed save for a sliver of the harbor between 1 and 2. Some of the dialog in 3 was clearly written for the protagonist of 1 and 2, and not for the new guy. Gnomes, an annoying bunch of chittering enemies in the first game, were brought into the second and third with a full culture and able to speak English, with the gnome sidekick being hilariously taught how to speak by listening to pirates. Patty, the daughter of a legendary pirate, sister of the third game's protagonist, transitions from a normal, 00's "sexy" design to a pirate to a pirate stripper. The first game starts with two factions, divided between using bows and using crystal magic, while the second has long guns versus voodoo, and the third has crystal magic, voodoo, and melee boosting rune magic with everyone being able to use long guns. The monsters on the various islands change entirely between games, with only warthogs lasting through all three. Only a few years take place between the three games, during which three apocalypse level events happen in this small non-Caribbean collection of islands.

Tl;dr; If you like some jank and haven't played them, they go on sale for peanuts during Steam sales. Go for it.

Uncle Khasim
Dec 20, 2009



Vangers was so far ahead of its time that I remember at least one magazine redacting their score and putting in on a Top 100 Games Ever Made list instead. Claymation visuals give it a look unlike any other game. The game and manual uses its own language and part of the story is working out what the hell the words mean and what exactly happened. I own both a physical copy and a Steam copy and one day I will finally get around to playing it..one day.

Also, shoutout to NPPD Rush for having a chip fat filter for the true 1980s experience. I donít think this game really fits on the good/bad spectrum but everything about this absolute mess of a game sticks with you.

unimportantguy
Dec 25, 2012

Maybe she has no parents and was raised by dogs?


I've looked at these games many times and never quite convinced myself to buy them, but you may have just convinced me.

Sekenr
Dec 12, 2013



Uncle Khasim posted:

Vangers was so far ahead of its time that I remember at least one magazine redacting their score and putting in on a Top 100 Games Ever Made list instead. Claymation visuals give it a look unlike any other game. The game and manual uses its own language and part of the story is working out what the hell the words mean and what exactly happened. I own both a physical copy and a Steam copy and one day I will finally get around to playing it..one day.

Also, shoutout to NPPD Rush for having a chip fat filter for the true 1980s experience. I donít think this game really fits on the good/bad spectrum but everything about this absolute mess of a game sticks with you.

This is something I tried to play when it first came out in 1998 and will never forget. For 98 russian game it was actually very polished, problem was controlling the drat car, they built voxel worlds with destructible topography and cars with actual physics and finally AI that is way better than me at driving around it.

But the goddamn WTF characters, world(s), the above mentioned new language and finally plot that surprises you by actually making sense within the rules of that warped fever dream of a setting.

Glare Seethe
May 15, 2004

Tenochtitlan, looking east.


Yeah, Vangers... it showed up in my Steam library a couple of years ago since I owned some of the publisher's other games. I tried, I really did. But the combination of the tank movement and topography kept landing me upside down in a ditch over and over again. If there was quicksave I think I'd have soldiered on but without it I gave up after an hour. Definitely felt kind of bad about ditching a cult classic. The gameplay seemed reminiscent of Escape Velocity, i.e. top-down, ferrying goods around and gradually working through a narrative. Maybe I'll try again sometime, in general I was into the weirdness.

I do remember the default controls to be kind of bonkers. Like something was assigned to 'F23'. Should've taken a screenshot when I still had it installed.

OutOfPrint
Apr 9, 2009


unimportantguy posted:

I've looked at these games many times and never quite convinced myself to buy them, but you may have just convinced me.

I'm pretty sure they go for $2.49, $4.99, and $9.99 on sale, respectively, for play times of around 30, 20, and 40 hours for Risen's 1, 2, and 3. There's no real need to play them in order, although doing so will answer some "Who the gently caress is this guy?" questions.

The biggest piece of advice I can give is to beeline for whichever faction sounds the most interesting. Joining a faction gives you access to new tools that make the games much more fun.

Which brings me back to Elex, and what I realized is its biggest flaw. In the Risen games, each faction is easily accessible. In 1, the factions are either "go left or right from the tutorial section." In 2 and 3, each faction has its own island, with the faction HQ's being a short walk from the port. This compartmentalization allowed Piranha Bites to add enemies intelligently, putting easier enemies along the paths to the faction HQ's while placing difficult enemies on each island further from the ports.

Elex is one big open map. On the one hand, this makes it more fun and interesting to explore; I mean it when I say Elex has the best post-apocalyptic setting I've seen in a video game, and exploring it is fantastic. On the other hand, the lack of compartmentalization means that the map, by necessity, is divided into four sections, one for each faction, and more difficult enemies the further you go from the starting point.

The game drops you off in the Berserker faction's territory, which is the "easy" quadrant. The Outlaw's desert is the "medium" difficulty, the Cleric's volcanic wasteland is the "hard" difficulty, and the non-joinable Alb's frozen wastes are the endgame area. This means that, if you wanted to join the Clerics like I did, you need to run from one corner of the gigantic map to the other, all with some of the most difficult monsters in the game nipping at your heels, because going toe-to-toe with them means being killed in one or two hits. Given that character power in Elex is even more dependent on faction upgrades than Risen, this makes for a pretty painful opening few hours of gameplay. The better way to handle this would have been to have some sort of safe pathways between faction HQ's, but, if that was implemented in the game, I didn't notice, and it certainly wasn't telegraphed.

I really, really liked Elex once it got rolling. I want Piranha Bites to make a sequel because, man, can they design a good setting. But no matter what they do next, I really hope they learned from the critical reception of Elex and tighten up the game design.

Glare Seethe
May 15, 2004

Tenochtitlan, looking east.


OutOfPrint posted:

I'm pretty sure they go for $2.49, $4.99, and $9.99 on sale, respectively, for play times of around 30, 20, and 40 hours for Risen's 1, 2, and 3.

They're actually super cheap at Fanatical at the moment for anyone who needs some good jank right this instant.

edit: Or just the first and third. They don't seem to sell the second one separately from the not-discounted franchise pack for some reason.

Glare Seethe fucked around with this message at Feb 14, 2018 around 18:14

anilEhilated
Feb 17, 2014

But I say fuck the rain.


Probably better that way - everything 2 does, 3 does better.

atholbrose
Feb 28, 2001

Splish!



Glare Seethe posted:

They're actually super cheap at Fanatical at the moment for anyone who needs some good jank right this instant.

Super-cheap == $3.99, for those wondering. The Lunar8 code even works on it. Ah, well, more backlog.

Sekenr
Dec 12, 2013



Glare Seethe posted:

Yeah, Vangers... it showed up in my Steam library a couple of years ago since I owned some of the publisher's other games. I tried, I really did. But the combination of the tank movement and topography kept landing me upside down in a ditch over and over again. If there was quicksave I think I'd have soldiered on but without it I gave up after an hour. Definitely felt kind of bad about ditching a cult classic. The gameplay seemed reminiscent of Escape Velocity, i.e. top-down, ferrying goods around and gradually working through a narrative. Maybe I'll try again sometime, in general I was into the weirdness.

I do remember the default controls to be kind of bonkers. Like something was assigned to 'F23'. Should've taken a screenshot when I still had it installed.

I actually managed to reach the second world, to discover that the inhabitants are much less chill than the slovenly worms. I got immediately demoted to slave for not having a "slave box" on me, they taken my car and put me into this tiny flea that has no weapons, a cargo hold barely big enough to hold the drat slave box but jumps very very high. There are means to avoid it but being their slave is kind of fun for awhile. Ironically the flea car is pretty good for this world's geography however to really progress you need a bigger car and they can't jump as high. This is where I had to quit. There are pretty decent highways but of course drat vangers blow them up all the time and if you fall into water its 10-20 minutes getting out of there.

The AI, I must say is pretty good. Reputation system determines how they react to you. There are some missions where you have to carry a boss (non vanger) creature in your car for "inspection" and other vangers will dare not touch you and scramble to GTFO of your way.

Pyromancer
Apr 29, 2011

This man must look upon the fire, smell of it, warm his hands by it, stare into its heart

OutOfPrint posted:

This means that, if you wanted to join the Clerics like I did, you need to run from one corner of the gigantic map to the other, all with some of the most difficult monsters in the game nipping at your heels, because going toe-to-toe with them means being killed in one or two hits.

Looks like you missed that you don't have to do this, there are at least two other ways to get there -
1) as you approach the domed city teleport you get a message it's linked to cleric city and that activates fast travel there without actually going there on foot first.
2) there is one or more special clerics roaming the map, and if you talk to them while factionless they use mind trick on you and you wake up in the cleric city as a recruit.

Pyromancer fucked around with this message at Feb 15, 2018 around 09:13

Glare Seethe
May 15, 2004

Tenochtitlan, looking east.


Sekenr posted:

I actually managed to reach the second world, to discover that the inhabitants are much less chill than the slovenly worms. I got immediately demoted to slave for not having a "slave box" on me, they taken my car and put me into this tiny flea that has no weapons, a cargo hold barely big enough to hold the drat slave box but jumps very very high. There are means to avoid it but being their slave is kind of fun for awhile. Ironically the flea car is pretty good for this world's geography however to really progress you need a bigger car and they can't jump as high. This is where I had to quit. There are pretty decent highways but of course drat vangers blow them up all the time and if you fall into water its 10-20 minutes getting out of there.

The AI, I must say is pretty good. Reputation system determines how they react to you. There are some missions where you have to carry a boss (non vanger) creature in your car for "inspection" and other vangers will dare not touch you and scramble to GTFO of your way.

This post makes me want to try it again. But it exemplifies a common characteristic among the games in this thread in that reading about them makes them sound weird and interesting and kind of amazing, but when you actually go to play them many require so much effort and/or patience to get to the fun that it's easy to just give up. I have a feeling that once you settle in with Vangers it probably is worth your time, but who knows how long it takes to get to that point.

edit: I suppose the flipside to that is that the more effort you have to make, the more special it is once you do actually get to the fun. That difficulty and inscrutability can make a game more memorable.

Glare Seethe fucked around with this message at Feb 15, 2018 around 13:41

OutOfPrint
Apr 9, 2009


Pyromancer posted:

Looks like you missed that you don't have to do this, there are at least two other ways to get there -
1) as you approach the domed city teleport you get a message it's linked to cleric city and that activates fast travel there without actually going there on foot first.
2) there is one or more special clerics roaming the map, and if you talk to them while factionless they use mind trick on you and you wake up in the cleric city as a recruit.

Yeah, I went to the domed city pretty late in the game, so that would do it. I didn't know the NPC clerics would actually do that, though. That would've saved me a lot of time!

C.M. Kruger
Oct 28, 2013


The talk about Vangers reminded me that I had a bit of fun a while back with another janky vehicle game a while back: Hard Truck Apocalypse, a post-apocalyptic "Freelancer with Trucks" style spinoff of a series of trucking sims published by ValuSoft.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I58jmN8WmNI

doctorfrog
Mar 14, 2007

Great.


I think the best game I can think of that fits the thread that hasn't been mentioned yet would be the N64 version of Nightmare Creatures.

There's this combination of PS-1-strength graphics, SD television resolution, a grumbly, spare soundtrack, the thick visuals, and bullshit 90's gothic hell Victorian England that just make the game for me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYK6qeUYryI

Those blue incredible hulk guys, you could saw off their limbs and beat them senseless as long as you like, and the generic tan zombie dudes, you could just KO over and over again, and they'd only die if you cut them in half.

This setting and overall aura of the game has been done to the death by now, though.

Glare Seethe
May 15, 2004

Tenochtitlan, looking east.


I'm 25 hours into Risen 3 and I have to say I'm finding it not much janky at all. Maybe I'm just used to the Piranha Bytes formula so much that I just gloss over it all. It is very much a PB game through and through though - the gruff lead, the almost complete lack of female characters, getting endlessly stunned/knocked down for the first ten hours, the relative paucity of gear/loot, and of course, the gorgeous and superb world design. It's just such a treat to wander around these islands. I pick up every drat clam I come across.

Having a lot of fun with it. It seems bigger than the first two as well as I haven't even started chapter 2 yet. I'm deliberately postponing my decision on which faction to join although it'll probably end up being the Mages else I've been hoarding all these crystals for nothing.

Mycroft Holmes
Mar 26, 2010

To the Moon! For Queen and Country!


Glare Seethe posted:

I'm 25 hours into Risen 3 and I have to say I'm finding it not much janky at all. Maybe I'm just used to the Piranha Bytes formula so much that I just gloss over it all. It is very much a PB game through and through though - the gruff lead, the almost complete lack of female characters, getting endlessly stunned/knocked down for the first ten hours, the relative paucity of gear/loot, and of course, the gorgeous and superb world design. It's just such a treat to wander around these islands. I pick up every drat clam I come across.

Having a lot of fun with it. It seems bigger than the first two as well as I haven't even started chapter 2 yet. I'm deliberately postponing my decision on which faction to join although it'll probably end up being the Mages else I've been hoarding all these crystals for nothing.

i sided with the natives so i can possess parrots

OutOfPrint
Apr 9, 2009


You can find scrolls of parrot flight everywhere. Mages rule...if you don't count in the whole "conquering white invaders turning gnomes into slaves and forcing them to work in mines" thing. They're no Inquisition, but, yeah. They get fun toys, though!

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Glare Seethe
May 15, 2004

Tenochtitlan, looking east.


Joined the mages and am now gradually depleting my quest log. At 41 hours played I think I'm not too far from wrapping this up - just the Forbidden Valley on Kila left as the last big area I haven't been to. One thing that annoys me about the game is the interruptions by sea monster battles when I just want to turn in some quests on another island. Likewise for the underworld segments when I want to sleep til daylight. Just gently caress off already. I think I'm done with the former, at least - I've done three now and the dialogue seemed to indicate that was that. Feels like they took that ship combat from Assassin's Creed really, much like how the Astral Vision is basically the Eagle/Witcher/Batman thing.

edit: One of the design decisions I really like about PB's games is that they let you do quests even if you haven't picked them up the intended way. You immediately get the experience and can turn them in with a dialogue option like "I already did that" or something like that. It bugs me when a game only spawns in an item / enemy if you've picked up the relevant quest, rather than having it just exist in the world.

Glare Seethe fucked around with this message at Mar 24, 2018 around 15:30

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