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Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

The Midniter posted:

I think blue cheeses work the best as a compound butter for steak, so if the person in question doesn't care for it, I'd recommend going with something other than cheese, like an herbed compound butter.

This. Blue cheese works because it is super different, but complimentary. I can't think of any other cheeses that would be worth trying.

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Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Pretty much any ricotta filling, just reduce the recipe's salt amount. Lasagna, manicotti, ravioli.

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Torquemada posted:

https://omnomcheese.com/oaxaca-cheese-recipe

Iíve followed this Oaxaca recipe to the letter a few times with edible results, using raw milk and microbial rennet, but I need to make improvements. How would I firstly impart a slightly more lactic flavour to it? Itís super bland to the point of tastelessness, and Iíd like a slight tang.

Secondly, working it in hot water is not as easy as it looks in the many videos Iíve seen of the process. It doesnít naturally string out, I end up having to squeeze it into ropes and elongate it gently by rolling it between my hands, as even a little pressure pulls it apart rather than it being elastic. Do I just need hotter water and thicker gloves? Or just a better recipe?

Your flavor and stretching problems are both pH-related. The acidification process takes some time, and needs to happen at a warm temp. That recipe tries to cheat by using citric acid, but it's probably not a great substitution to begin with, and not enough of it to do the job anyway. They call out "Leave the curd at room temperature overnight to develop more flavour and further acidify the curd" but it's after the curd draining, so all of the whey is gone, which is the food for the bacteria to make more acid.

The first thing I would try is for the first step, go ahead and bring the curd up to 32c, then add the buttermilk/citric acid, let sit for 30 minutes* to allow the buttermilk cultures to do some work. Then follow the whole thing like normal.

*The 30 minutes is a conservative guess, since I don't know what the culture density and starting acidity of your buttermilk is. If that's not long enough to give you the flavor and texture that you are looking for, add another 15 minutes to the next batch, and then another 15 again if needed. If you hit more than 60 minutes before renetting at 32c and still not getting a good pH drop, there's a problem, don't just keep adding more time.

If a batch gets the curd knitting together well, but not enough flavor, get some medium lipase and add it at the same time as your buttermilk/citric acid. Lipase will continue to add flavor over time even in a completed cheese and at fridge temp.

Doom Rooster fucked around with this message at Jun 17, 2019 around 13:44

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