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Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

maskenfreiheit posted:

so if a company offers feedback after a rejection then ghosts, should you follow up or just take the hint?

if they offered you feedback after a rejection, that is the opposite of ghosting you

what else is there to say after that? it's not a hint. they rejected you. and told you why.

maskenfreiheit posted:

hypothetically, if this same company also tried to call you on the wrong day for the interview, then changed the time a second time after confirming the original agreed upon time was confirmed, should you follow up?

if it pisses you off, don't?

maskenfreiheit posted:

i normally don't write anything on glassdoor just use it for salary info but i'm sorely tempted to light them up, and maybe a happy medium is a terse "hi company, here's some feeback for you

never put anything on glassdoor

it can only hurt you

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Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

PleasureKevin posted:

should i ask to get paid for this though?

you have negotiate pay before agreeing to do it

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

maskenfreiheit posted:

no what i'm saying is they sent a polite rejection and offered to send feedback, i said thank you for the quick followup and i'd love feedback anddddd..... nothing. for weeks now.

i think that counts as ghosting?

no that's still quite polite. the cruel and nasty thing to do is to never send the rejection.

i mean you can ask again but i wouldn't expect to hear anything

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

Emacs Headroom posted:

I promise that once you're gone they won't GAF. not only that but hr people are told by legal not to slander ex-employees

good recruiters and good managers do backchannel to each other (if they're in the same social network / same city), so if you're causing an actual problem like sexually harassing people, or punching a client or something, it could potentially get back to you. but they're really, really not going to dig through glass loving door to try to figure out who you are and retaliate.

ive seen people fired for really egregious stuff (like getting into fistfights at work) and come back with >5 offers a little while later after getting their poo poo together. as long as you're not shittalking your ex-employer during your interview, it's never gonna come up

it's a small, small, small world. poo poo gets around. and hr staff definitely watch glassdoor

contributing to glassdoor gets you nothing, and it can potentially hurt you. the safe and sane choice is to not leave snippy notes on a public website

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

qhat posted:

Oh no the geeky software developer said a bad thing about the company, let me just remember their name for the rest of my life so I can gently caress over their careers.

you are so incredibly bad at these things i am astounded you remain employed

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

Emacs Headroom posted:

if you don't want to write something up, don't, we don't give a poo poo either. but it's paranoid and delusional to think it's gonna get back to you

paranoia is a healthy reflex in corporate america. everything can get back to you

it can never, ever, ever help you to have spurt your dumb goop into the world on glassdoor. and it could, in a land of sufficiently paranoid fantasy, hurt you

stay the gently caress away from things with 0 upside and non-0 downside

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

maskenfreiheit posted:

Pascalís wager lives

pascal's wager was a joke, a naked jape at atheists denying the obvious

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

qhat posted:

The whole point of glassdoor is to identify the good companies from the cowboys, and it's really useful in that regard. It's useless if nobody ever posts negative critique because they are scared some HR type is going to go all Sherlock on their post. If you don't want to post then don't, who cares. It's nice to let the general public know who are the cunts and who aren't though.

only clueless losers post on Glassdoor

this is not usually a helpful perspective on a company

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

jony neuemonic posted:

i just donít find it useful, i guess. between the hr plants, and no way of knowing if you and random anonymous reviewer #7 want the same things out of a job i havenít seen much reason to put any stock in it. even the worst companies iíve worked at manage to keep around 4/5 stars there.

salary info is handy though.

consistent with the clueless loser user base hypothesis,I have never made less than the maximum value posted to Glassdoor for my job

it is obvious that only idiots are using the site. as a result, salaries skew low

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

Emacs Headroom posted:

you don't have to be a total mercenary all the time

im not sure you know how this game works, friend

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

Shinku ABOOKEN posted:

i am hoping to jump from $140k after tax to $230k after tax. wish me luck.

Emacs Headroom posted:

good luck.

post your location / job title -- also how much is base vs. bonus vs stock? I'm at 260 base + 128k rsus in SF (just started new job)

wow some p. deece 6.5 figgies itt

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

cis autodrag posted:

I took a slight pay cut in terms of COL moving to Apple with the assumption that having that on my resume will make me way more attractive for big figgy positions in a few years.

that's normal

moving to a high-CoL area never increases wages as much as the CoL

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
boston and chicago have very high cost of living. raleigh is close to the national average

i think your sense of the costs may be skewed by having a ton of money and being a computer toucher in big cities

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
moving from the midwest to new york city, my pay went up by 50%, but my cost of living more than doubled due to hosting costs

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
yep #2 happened to me

i enjoyed living in the midwest but i was working at the only game in town and eventually my career kinda topped out

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
i haven't gotten a real raise since i started my current job -- just 1-2% joke raises.

i like my employer but not enough to be underpaid. it is a sad conundrum.

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
it's the last .5 that make your figgies truly deece

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
i wouldn't mind that sweet, sweet $400k total comp

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

EnergizerFellow posted:

As for Netflix specifically, even with a historically optimistic P/E of 20, there's just no way Netflix can grow top-line 10x, even in theory. The crash will be fun and hard.

they definitely can. netflix has tremendous room for growth. it is not unthinkable to imagine a world where virtually all adult households have a netflix subscription

the problem with netflix is not p/e or earnings, it's the monstrous debt load. they've got 4.6 billion in just regular ole debt, and ~15 billion in contracted obligations to rights owners

that's a lot of debt for a firm the size of netflix to manage

especially when you consider they are likely to need another billion dollars in debt next year, and another billion after that, in order to further build their content library

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

Schadenboner posted:

FTFY. Do not invest in individual equities, everyone at the table knows more than you do.

even if you think you are a genius stock picker, don't hold your employer's stock. that poo poo is just dumb

you already have a huge stake in your employer in that you depend on them for a salary. don't double-down and also hold your savings in their stock. that is the opposite of diversification

when you lose your job you don't want that to be the moment your investment account loses half its value

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

Emacs Headroom posted:

i know someone who's doing a salary review in the bay area right now (data science / ML manager). here's what he told me about what they've found:

i have lived my life all wrong

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

PleasureKevin posted:

is this allowed



that's illegal unless it's like, a religious institution.

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

PleasureKevin posted:

They also asked if I was hispanic and smoked. Not smoking is a condition of employment. For this remote job.

that's perfectly legal in most states. as is blood/piss testing to verify that you do not, in fact, smoke.

"smoker" is not a protected class

"hispanic" is, though. wonder why they would even want to know that -- seems like lawsuit bait.

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
you can, and should, ask the recruiter what the appropriate interview garb is. this is a totally normal thing to do.

some places really, really want a suit

others will give you the stink eye

it costs you nothing to just ask

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

Captain Foo posted:

a suit is correct or at least not wrong unless you are interviewing at some weird west coast dudebro shop in which case rethink your job application entirely

a suit is never wrong per se but it can be awkward as hell

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
i live in nyc. i always ask the recruiter before an interview. i usually end up wearing a nice blazer, button up, and jeans. often no tie.

sometimes a suit is appropriate, and sometimes it is not, and it never hurts to ask the god drat recruiter.

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
i am very comfortable in a suit. it is, if anything, my preferred wear.

but, i recognize that social context is more important than my personal comfort. i wear the clothes that will make my interviewers comfortable, not what makes me happiest.

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

cis autodrag posted:

be a girl, then you can dress formalish and if it was overdressed, it doesn't matter the nerds interviewing you don't know poo poo about women's clothing anyway.

women still must face the suit vs non-suit dichotomy

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

cis autodrag posted:

unless you're literally interviewing at a fortune 500 where pinstripes are mandatory

ding ding ding

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

cis autodrag posted:

If you're interviewing at a fortune 500 and don't know what to wear it's not the right job for you.

my best jobs ever have been fortune 500. big companies can be warm, inclusive, welcoming places.

thinking you won't fit in because you don't know anything about it up front, or because you may be expected to wear a suit for certain job interviews, risks missing out on some really great workplaces

call the recruiter. ask about interview garb. that's why the recruiter is there

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
undergraduate life is a five year paid vacation for children of the affluent

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
it used to be that going to college was proof your parents were rich, so you passed the test just by graduating

now that universities grant scholarships and poo poo, competitive industries use unpaid internships to serve as the screening function instead. "we could afford to pay you, but we don't want to accidentally hire the offspring of dirty poors"

for all of the technology industry's manifold sins, at least we generally pay our loving interns

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

qhat posted:

If a recruiter comes up to you on LinkedIn, does anyone else right off the bat ask what the compensation range is? Most of these guys just want to speak to me for half an hour on the phone or at coffee or whatever, half an hour that I don't got to just realise they want to pay less than what I already earn.

no one cold calling you off linkedin is ever worth your time

recruiters are a necessary evil, sure, but the ones who are trolling linkedin are the bottom-feeders' bottom-feeder. they literally had nothing better to do than pitch long shots.

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

The Management posted:

I tried this a few times and itís a guaranteed way to kill the conversation. what you want is for them to decide that they need you first. then the hiring manager can put pressure on the recruiter to come up with the number you want.

yeah the comp range advertised by hr is not like, a hard and fast rule. when it comes time to negotiate all things are flexible

it's more important to find companies you want to work for, and recruiters who have connections to those firms, than it is to try and winnow opportunities by comp early in the process

(remember, the companies are also trying to winnow candidates by comp demand, early in the process, so the best you can ever get out of it is mutually screening each other out for a reason that could have easily been overcome during negotiations)

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

Share Bear posted:

i dont program in my free time, why would i have a github

can't answer this one

Share Bear posted:

why would any company willingly contribute to open source

this is a lot easier

broadly there are two reasons

  1. bragging rights

    open sourcing something you did in house is a great way to book your staff on speaking tours and raise your visibility in the community. it helps you recruit, it helps existing staff feel better, and it often costs you little or nothing

  2. leveraging the community

    contributing to open source often means building a multi-firm consortium, in which everyone donates and everyone gets something back. it lets you build a bigger, better, more robust software product than you were able to do alone

    linux and java are successful examples of the second type

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

The Management posted:

donít accept a job before speaking with your new immediate manager first.

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

qhat posted:

Never disclose your current salary ever, anywhere. If they won't continue the process without knowing, it's never worth your time anyway.

this is over-broad advice. it's ok to disclose your current salary. just don't give it up without a fight. don't give it up just because they asked.

give it up when it's time to negotiate, if and only if you believe the disclosure will improve your negotiating position.

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

qhat posted:

If you ever do give it up under the pretence that they're doing you a favour, it has to be a "this is my salary, but this is what I want" and you gotta be prepared to walk. Your current salary, at the end of the day, is utterly irrelevant in judging your value as an employee and you gotta walk if they judge it as something else.

you always have to be prepared to walk

Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene

Gazpacho posted:

"I hear you're looking to sell a house"
"That's right"
"So could you tell me what you paid for it?"

this happens all the time, and sometimes it can be advantageous to the seller

if you are at the last stage of a hiring process, dickering over salary, you may still have very different expectations about comp. if you ask for $170k, but they were expecting to pay $100k, the bitter pill will go down a lot easier after you mention you make $150k right now. all of a sudden your $170k ask looks like a pretty good deal.

your current/prior salary can constitute social proof, and that can be useful leverage at the end of the process

what you don't want to do is tell some hr flunky your current salary at the beginning of the process. at best, it anchors all negotiations to your current salary. at worst, it filters you out entirely because some beancounting moron already picked a salary band for the job.

--

tl;dr: don't talk about money until you both agree that you're a great fit for the position

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Notorious b.s.d.
Jan 25, 2003

by Reene
asking for your last salary is partly negotiation tactic (leverage for them), and partly a hunt for social proof (leverage for you)

as a job-seeker, try to avoid disclosure when it hurts you, and don't sweat it too hard when it helps you

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