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guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

Submarine Sandpaper posted:

mmmf that looks good. Do you know if you an acetone the mac logo off it though? I suppose I could sand it.

what's the difference between pro and chef series, just fit an finish or is weight a consideration?

I'm afraid I don't know about the logo, I don't really do anything to my knives beyond honing and the occasional sharpening.

The Pro series has bolsters for balance (not a bad thing, they don't have that weird flattened bit at the foot of the blade that some bolsters have that creates issues as you sharpen) and I think the steel is different, although it may not be on that specific model. I'm not a professional chef, I have a friend who is and he's the one who recommended the Pro series chef's knife to me. I bought the santoku on my own later, although I believe it's the knife the same friend's wife prefers. I think of that line as my go-to at this point but I couldn't really offer much in the way of specific reasons for that vs. the Chef series. I do prefer the bolster but it may just be what I'm used to.


Ranter posted:

Housemate hosed my 3 year old tojiro DP santoku taking a huge bite out of the edge. I want a pretty damascus santoku anyway. Any recommendations for something < $150?

This doesn't have a Damascus finish, but it's purely aesthetic and this is within budget. Surprise, it's a Mac Pro again. I have this santoku and it is one of my favorite knives, I absolutely love it: https://www.amazon.com/Mac-Knife-Pr...ssional+santoku

guppy fucked around with this message at Feb 15, 2018 around 21:55

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Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


mindphlux posted:

those two knives have essentially the same profile, just one photo the person is push cutting, the other they're rocking excessively.

I have 3 wusthofs on my wall, a shun, a gyoto, a messermeister, a couple macs.

there's a difference between a french style knife and a gyoto (though it's slight)

there's no loving difference between a "german" style knife and a "french" chefs knife though, that's just absurd talk - and/or a distinction that was just fabricated ex nihilo. they're the exact same thing. different blades might be shaped differently, but they're the same profile and general curve.

You have your poo poo mixed up, a gyoto is simply a japanese western style knife and could encompass any profile if they bothered to make every profile.

Gyotos usually have the gawdy bird's beak tip. i.e.

That certainly doesn't have a gentile curve and the belly is completely flat. I don't know my japanese knife regions well but the height and length of flat spot is known as a city/region style, Takeda iirc is a popular brand that uses it too. The tip only exists for tip work or mince, you push or chop with it and it's a bit tall for a slicer. This was actually my first gyoto after having nothing but wustofs and I honestly didn't realize how bad the below grand prix ii was for anything but rocking.

is a french profile gyoto based off the sab. There's a very obvious flat belly a little bit past the engraving then a very gentle slope and the tip is approached from both sides to avoid the god awful japanese beak. You can chop/push/rock/slice and the tip is thin enough to turn in food for fine work. It's unreal how light this specific knife is; I sadly have only been able to find a slightly heavier knock off.


German, no flat spot at all. This is the knife in the gif. Enjoy your rocking. Wusthof does make a french profile called "le cordon bleu" of all things https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0001WN9W...oding=UTF8&th=1 based off the sab in profile and an attempt to make them lighter.

Outside of a shun classic I don't really know of any japanese makers who use so much belly as your average henkel or wustof. Even very belly heavy knives usually have a quarter or so near the heel for chopping. You need to be more specific with messermeister as they have a catalog with almost any profile.

Perhaps it would be acceptable to you if we use "Western Chef Knife" instead of German for too much belly and we can use "sab" for the french profile?

guppy posted:

I'm afraid I don't know about the logo, I don't really do anything to my knives beyond honing and the occasional sharpening.

The Pro series has bolsters for balance (not a bad thing, they don't have that weird flattened bit at the foot of the blade that some bolsters have that creates issues as you sharpen) and I think the steel is different, although it may not be on that specific model. I'm not a professional chef, I have a friend who is and he's the one who recommended the Pro series chef's knife to me. I bought the santoku on my own later, although I believe it's the knife the same friend's wife prefers. I think of that line as my go-to at this point but I couldn't really offer much in the way of specific reasons for that vs. the Chef series. I do prefer the bolster but it may just be what I'm used to.
I'll need to find one. I have tiny tiny hands which makes bolsters not my friend.

Scott808
Jul 11, 2001


Wroughtirony posted:

I don't see your point. I'm not saying you're wrong, I just don't understand what you're trying to show. Because you can draw a straight line from the tip to the heel of any round knife and draw a straight parallel line and call it a cutting board. I guess when I say "French knife" I mean rounded as opposed to flat like a cleaver or santoku, so I'm not being super precise, since a gyuto is rounded. I'm still confused. ELI5?


e: on second look, are you talking about the Shun being different in that it doesn't have the flat end of the blade like the Sabatier?


I just leveled them off with the tip and heel because that seemed to be the easiest way to put them on a consistent starting point. The line is just there to show that they're all actually leveled on the same points that I'm claiming.You can orient the knives however you'd like.

A cutting board surface is generally relatively flat, so that's why the big green rectangle, it's there to represent a flat cutting surface. Could be any color you want, but for me that green is easy to see since nothing else is that color at all in the pictures. Since the green line is just to illustrate that I leveled off on the heel and tip there's no significance that they're parallel to each other.

When compared, your Shun is, IMO, the outlier. It's very curvy with almost no flat. To me, it is much further from the Sabatier profile (which is, as far as I know, considered the classic French profile) than the other two.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Submarine Sandpaper posted:

Pictures are not loading but I like https://www.chefknivestogo.com/satadahasa18.html their petty.

I really like this. Pretty and doesn't break the bank.

guppy posted:

This doesn't have a Damascus finish, but it's purely aesthetic and this is within budget. Surprise, it's a Mac Pro again. I have this santoku and it is one of my favorite knives, I absolutely love it: https://www.amazon.com/Mac-Knife-Pr...ssional+santoku

This is ugly. Ew.

Scott808
Jul 11, 2001


Submarine Sandpaper posted:

You have your poo poo mixed up, a gyoto is simply a japanese western style knife and could encompass any profile if they bothered to make every profile.

Gyotos usually have the gawdy bird's beak tip. i.e.

That certainly doesn't have a gentile curve and the belly is completely flat. I don't know my japanese knife regions well but the height and length of flat spot is known as a city/region style, Takeda iirc is a popular brand that uses it too. The tip only exists for tip work or mince, you push or chop with it and it's a bit tall for a slicer. This was actually my first gyoto after having nothing but wustofs and I honestly didn't realize how bad the below grand prix ii was for anything but rocking.

is a french profile gyoto based off the sab. There's a very obvious flat belly a little bit past the engraving then a very gentle slope and the tip is approached from both sides to avoid the god awful japanese beak. You can chop/push/rock/slice and the tip is thin enough to turn in food for fine work. It's unreal how light this specific knife is; I sadly have only been able to find a slightly heavier knock off.


German, no flat spot at all. This is the knife in the gif. Enjoy your rocking. Wusthof does make a french profile called "le cordon bleu" of all things https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0001WN9W...oding=UTF8&th=1 based off the sab in profile and an attempt to make them lighter.

Outside of a shun classic I don't really know of any japanese makers who use so much belly as your average henkel or wustof. Even very belly heavy knives usually have a quarter or so near the heel for chopping. You need to be more specific with messermeister as they have a catalog with almost any profile.

Perhaps it would be acceptable to you if we use "Western Chef Knife" instead of German for too much belly and we can use "sab" for the french profile?
I'll need to find one. I have tiny tiny hands which makes bolsters not my friend.

What are you referring to when you say belly? The belly is the curved part of the blade near the tip.

A gyuto (it is not "gyoto") is not any Japanese western style knife. There are some variations on the theme, but a 99% of the time gyuto means a double beveled western style chef knife.

AVeryLargeRadish
Aug 19, 2011

WolfDad is Best Dad.


Scott808 posted:

What are you referring to when you say belly? The belly is the curved part of the blade near the tip.

A gyuto (it is not "gyoto") is not any Japanese western style knife. There are some variations on the theme, but a 99% of the time gyuto means a double beveled western style chef knife.

Yeah, this. I have seen all sorts of profiles on gyutos, including ones with a gentle curve over the entire length of the blade.

Wroughtirony
May 14, 2007



Scott808 posted:

I just leveled them off with the tip and heel because that seemed to be the easiest way to put them on a consistent starting point. The line is just there to show that they're all actually leveled on the same points that I'm claiming.You can orient the knives however you'd like.

A cutting board surface is generally relatively flat, so that's why the big green rectangle, it's there to represent a flat cutting surface. Could be any color you want, but for me that green is easy to see since nothing else is that color at all in the pictures. Since the green line is just to illustrate that I leveled off on the heel and tip there's no significance that they're parallel to each other.

When compared, your Shun is, IMO, the outlier. It's very curvy with almost no flat. To me, it is much further from the Sabatier profile (which is, as far as I know, considered the classic French profile) than the other two.

Okay that makes a little more sense. Yeah, the shun definitely has the most exaggerated curve. It works well for me because I do rock chop more than most- I find it better for my wrists if I keep them loose and instigate most of the movement from the elbow. What that technique lacks in speed it makes up for in me not having chronic tendonitis.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Scott808 posted:

What are you referring to when you say belly? The belly is the curved part of the blade near the tip.
Belly from me is heal to tip but not tip inclusive.
my b on spelling, I'm hooked on phonics.

Pantsmaster Bill
May 7, 2007


My knives are all blunt. Do I send them off to the local place to be sharpened, or buy a sharpening stone and give it a go?

Ror
Oct 21, 2010

Everything's purrfect!


Pantsmaster Bill posted:

My knives are all blunt. Do I send them off to the local place to be sharpened, or buy a sharpening stone and give it a go?

If you're a knife fan most people will probably recommend learning how to sharpen eventually, but I would just start with a single knife you don't mind ruining when you're beginning to learn. You might have a knack for it, but it usually takes a bit of doing it wrong before you figure out some proper technique.

If you have a bunch of knives that you want sharp and usable right now, go to your local place. You can probably find someone who will do it for pretty cheap, especially compared to good sharpening supplies (my local lady charges $6 for 10" and does a better job than I could with years more practice).

The real advantage of knowing how to sharpen yourself is that you can touch up the edge whenever you want, so you don't have to let your knives get too dull between sharpenings if you're stingy and you can always have the exact edge that you want. If you just want to be able to use your knives to their fullest and not learn a ton about edge profiles then I would get them professionally sharpened and look into getting a honing steel (or whatever honing tool is appropriate if you have a harder knife) and learn how to hone your knife before uses. It depends on the quality of your knives and how much you use them, but you can go for a long time on a single good sharpening and regular care.

Ror fucked around with this message at Feb 18, 2018 around 19:24

Zorak of Michigan
Jun 10, 2006

Waiting for his chance

Ror posted:

If you're a knife fan most people will probably recommend learning how to sharpen eventually, but I would just start with a single knife you don't mind ruining when you're beginning to learn. You might have a knack for it, but it usually takes a bit of doing it wrong before you figure out some proper technique.

This is very good advice. I kind of got carried away with the coarse stone on my Henckels chef's knife and created a small spot about an inch and a half from the base where I took too much material away, so if I don't use a full stroke when cutting, it can't cut all the way through. If that was a knife I really cared about, I'd have cried.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


If you go the sharpening route you're not going to end up with a duller knife unless you're Michael j fox. You can avoid a dramatic reprofile like the above by checking for a bur on occasion. Get them sharpened at your local spot once if a bevel needs to be set then use a sharpie when it comes time to sharpen to be sure you're hitting it.

BrianBoitano
Nov 15, 2006

This is fine.


Forgive me thread, for I have sinned. I tried to fix it, but I'm sure a professional would weep. It cuts paper fine but I should probably spend another 10 minutes later.



The chip came from me being way too aggressive skinning a Seminole squash. Carbon steel Kramer Zwilling, I used 220 grit sandpaper on a granite slab until I got the chip away, then used my 1000 grit, then 6000 grit stone.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

BrianBoitano posted:

Forgive me thread, for I have sinned. I tried to fix it, but I'm sure a professional would weep.

Pretty sure the only thing a pro might do different is retain the profile of the belly angles a little better. They're still going to grind the knife down to remove the chip just like you did. If you want an example of a knife that's been sharpened forever, look through the chefsteps videos for the knife that has a scalloped blade profile - that blade has been re-profiled so many times the scalloping is down into the edge of the knife.

https://youtu.be/YS_kItQI98c?t=56

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YS_kItQI98c#t=56s

CrazyLittle fucked around with this message at Feb 19, 2018 around 06:17

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

CrazyLittle posted:

If you want an example of a knife that's been sharpened forever

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry


Yup, and a perfect example of why bolsters on the blade can be more hassle than they're worth

Nostalgia4Ass
Oct 12, 2012

'smeper fi


Is this a good deal? I am sure these cut the exact same as the less expensive models but I don't mind paying a little more for rosewood handles if it means the knives feel higher quality when you hold them.

https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-S...victorinox&th=1

Right now the only knives we have are Cutco ones from the demo set I used when I sold them for a couple of months 18 years ago. The others are cheap garbage we picked up at the store over the years. I am looking to get a few decent knives because I am tired of it being so hard to cut vegetables with the ones we have. I don't even really need all those knives or anything. My wife is vegetarian, we live in Japan (where beef is really expensive), and I mostly eat fish and chicken. I want versatile knives and something to put them in since I don't have a place to hang a thing with magnets. Budget is ~250 usd or under.

(Also I have a US mailing address and can shop on Amazon or whatever other site people buy knives from.)

fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

Nostalgia4Ass posted:

Is this a good deal? I am sure these cut the exact same as the less expensive models but I don't mind paying a little more for rosewood handles if it means the knives feel higher quality when you hold them.

https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-S...victorinox&th=1

Right now the only knives we have are Cutco ones from the demo set I used when I sold them for a couple of months 18 years ago. The others are cheap garbage we picked up at the store over the years. I am looking to get a few decent knives because I am tired of it being so hard to cut vegetables with the ones we have. I don't even really need all those knives or anything. My wife is vegetarian, we live in Japan (where beef is really expensive), and I mostly eat fish and chicken. I want versatile knives and something to put them in since I don't have a place to hang a thing with magnets. Budget is ~250 usd or under.

(Also I have a US mailing address and can shop on Amazon or whatever other site people buy knives from.)

Just buy knives in Japan unless you really don't like Japanese knives. I have friends there and they've told me prices on CTKG are significantly higher than buying the same knives actually in Japan.

Hulebr00670065006e
Apr 20, 2010


I have some knives that I believe are about 55-56HRC. Will a ceramic honing rod be fine for that or should I just sharpen once in blue moon instead?

guppy
Sep 21, 2004

sting like a byob

Nostalgia4Ass posted:

Is this a good deal? I am sure these cut the exact same as the less expensive models but I don't mind paying a little more for rosewood handles if it means the knives feel higher quality when you hold them.

https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-S...victorinox&th=1

Right now the only knives we have are Cutco ones from the demo set I used when I sold them for a couple of months 18 years ago. The others are cheap garbage we picked up at the store over the years. I am looking to get a few decent knives because I am tired of it being so hard to cut vegetables with the ones we have. I don't even really need all those knives or anything. My wife is vegetarian, we live in Japan (where beef is really expensive), and I mostly eat fish and chicken. I want versatile knives and something to put them in since I don't have a place to hang a thing with magnets. Budget is ~250 usd or under.

(Also I have a US mailing address and can shop on Amazon or whatever other site people buy knives from.)

It's an okay price if you want the rosewood handles and you really do want all of those knives. I'm not sure either of those is true. I did the math and versus the price of the individual knives, you're paying $55 for the block and the honing steel. I would personally probably just buy the Fibrox versions of the chef's, paring, and bread knives and a few Bladesafes instead of the block, which would also save some counter space. Add in the honing steel and the price for all that on Amazon is about $115.The rosewood looks a little nicer but I don't think it looks $125 nicer. You wouldn't get much use out of the slicer; the boning knife is fine and all but you could get by fine with the chef's knife.

There is a 3-pack containing the three knives I mentioned, but for some reason it's actually more expensive than just buying the three knives.

rockcity
Jan 16, 2004


Nostalgia4Ass posted:

Is this a good deal? I am sure these cut the exact same as the less expensive models but I don't mind paying a little more for rosewood handles if it means the knives feel higher quality when you hold them.

https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-S...victorinox&th=1

Right now the only knives we have are Cutco ones from the demo set I used when I sold them for a couple of months 18 years ago. The others are cheap garbage we picked up at the store over the years. I am looking to get a few decent knives because I am tired of it being so hard to cut vegetables with the ones we have. I don't even really need all those knives or anything. My wife is vegetarian, we live in Japan (where beef is really expensive), and I mostly eat fish and chicken. I want versatile knives and something to put them in since I don't have a place to hang a thing with magnets. Budget is ~250 usd or under.

(Also I have a US mailing address and can shop on Amazon or whatever other site people buy knives from.)

Where in Japan? I picked up a couple of awesome hand forged knives from Tower Knives in Osaka for about $300 (gyuto and nakiri). They were super helpful and let me try out a whole bunch of them on vegetables. They have a Tokyo location too.

Nostalgia4Ass
Oct 12, 2012

'smeper fi


I appreciate everyone's input and advice. I live in Kyushu near Fukuoka. I know there is a local knife maker that folks have raved about. I think I will go check his shop out before I buy something off Amazon. My hesitation has been from the language barrier and a fear that his stuff would be so expensive I wouldn't be able to afford anything. I speak some Japanese but not well enough to ask specific knife questions and the guy who runs the local shop is very old which makes it less likely he speak English. Worst case scenario, ordering online isn't going anywhere I guess.

Nostalgia4Ass fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2018 around 20:29

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Nostalgia4Ass posted:

I appreciate everyone's input and advice. I live in Kyushu near Fukuoka. I know there is a local knife maker that folks have raved about. I think I will go check his shop out before I buy something off Amazon. My hesitation has been from the language barrier and a fear that his stuff would be so expensive I wouldn't be able to afford anything. I speak some Japanese but not well enough to ask specific knife questions and the guy who runs the local shop is very old which makes it less likely he speak English. Worst case scenario, ordering online isn't going anywhere I guess.

All I have to say on this is that I'm really happy with my yanagiba that I purchased in Asakusa

rockcity
Jan 16, 2004


Nostalgia4Ass posted:

I appreciate everyone's input and advice. I live in Kyushu near Fukuoka. I know there is a local knife maker that folks have raved about. I think I will go check his shop out before I buy something off Amazon. My hesitation has been from the language barrier and a fear that his stuff would be so expensive I wouldn't be able to afford anything. I speak some Japanese but not well enough to ask specific knife questions and the guy who runs the local shop is very old which makes it less likely he speak English. Worst case scenario, ordering online isn't going anywhere I guess.

That was actually why I went to Tower Knives. The owner is Danish but has lived in Japan like 20 years. He spoke perfect English and was super helpful. They had two store fronts in Osaka, one with commercially available knives and one that was all hand forged small maker Japanese stuff. My gyuto was like $160 for one of the locally forged blades.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

SubG posted:

If you're still in the market for one. As it turns out that's from Only You Kitchenware, which is the same aliexpress merchant we linked to earlier in the thread. If you look through their storefront it looks like they have a couple of other similar knives.

I wasn't actually on the lookout for this...apparently this poo poo just finds me.

Bad news, turns out the factory stopped making them, so I got a refund

There go my dreams of being a Chinese farmer lady

edit: actually there's two similar knives might be close enough
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Fre...9999.262.De21Sh
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Fre...9999.272.De21Sh

Steve Yun fucked around with this message at Feb 23, 2018 around 22:45

emotive
Dec 26, 2006



Zwilling 7 Chefs knife is on sale for $50 down from $130. Worth picking up to replace my victorinox?

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Steve Yun posted:

Bad news, turns out the factory stopped making them, so I got a refund

There go my dreams of being a Chinese farmer lady

edit: actually there's two similar knives might be close enough
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Fre...9999.262.De21Sh
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Fre...9999.272.De21Sh
Yeah, those look like the same design---same spine geometry, same handle, and so on---just bigger.

Unrelated to that but since I'm posting anyway why not, here's another lower-priced CCK KF130x alternative.



This is a SBZ F208-1. Unlike the other cleavers I've posted in this thread it's stainless instead of high carbon. Thickness along the spine at the heel is just a hair over 2.3mm. Blade is 225mm x 95 mm. Weighs around 379 g. The CCK is a KF1301 (the #1 small slicer, bigger cousin of the one everybody knows from ck2g), which is 232 mm x 101 mm x 2.8 mm and 367 g.

Picked it up just because I wanted to try a stainless sangdao and liked the other SBZ cleaver I own. The fit and finish is noticeably nicer than on the similarly-priced carbon steel cleavers (including the CCK). Still not fancy, but a step up from the utilitarian workhorse construction of the others. You mostly notice it on the tolerances on the ferrule and the machining of the handle. Doesn't really affect usage any, just throwing it out there.

The SBZ is around US$30 from aliexpress.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

emotive posted:

Zwilling 7 Chefs knife is on sale for $50 down from $130. Worth picking up to replace my victorinox?

Which Zwilling? Is it the one with the diagonal bolster like the misen? If so yeah I have the 8", and I'm plenty happy with it I got it for $50 because of a store putting the wrong price tag on it

emotive
Dec 26, 2006



Steve Yun posted:

Which Zwilling? Is it the one with the diagonal bolster like the misen? If so yeah I have the 8", and I'm plenty happy with it I got it for $50 because of a store putting the wrong price tag on it

This one here: https://www.williams-sonoma.com/pro...-7-chefs-knife/

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

Yeah! That's a pretty good line

Edit: it has the rounder belly like the 38401 chef knife, mine is the 38411 and has the straighter belly. I think I might pick up the 38401 later if it goes on sale just so I have a rocking-friendlier knife. I tried it at the store and it almost felt like it had a mind of its own, very eager to rock

Steve Yun fucked around with this message at Feb 24, 2018 around 08:26

caberham
Mar 18, 2009

MY RELENTLESS TERRITORIAL SHITPOSTING IS A FRONT FOR THE FACT THAT I'M TSUNDERE FOR OSAKA

Grimey Drawer

emotive posted:

Zwilling 7 Chefs knife is on sale for $50 down from $130. Worth picking up to replace my victorinox?

I don't know, op. Hope this helps!

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


emotive posted:

Zwilling 7” Chefs knife is on sale for $50 down from $130. Worth picking up to replace my victorinox?
7" is really short and in my experience the victorinox blades are better than zwilling (lighter, holds an edge better). That one looks decent in that it doesn't have a bolster but I personally wouldn't buy it.

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


SubG posted:



ARE YOU READY TO ROCK?!?!?
That's a cute knife.

BEHOLD THE CCK BUTCHER, HOBBIT SWORD!
*sangdao for scale.

On the real though, a small rhino on the flavor bible is extremely my poo poo.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Babylon Astronaut posted:

That's a cute knife.

BEHOLD THE CCK BUTCHER, HOBBIT SWORD!
*sangdao for scale.

On the real though, a small rhino on the flavor bible is extremely my poo poo.
Yeah, I have one of those too.



I think the first time I posted about it here I made a joke about orcs instead of hobbits, though.

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


Once you embrace the brutality of CCK culinary knives.....

Hobbit sword is what my wife calls it. What have you been using yours for? I like it for cleaving, and lobster thermidor style dishes where you have to break it down the long way.

Babylon Astronaut fucked around with this message at Mar 2, 2018 around 05:57

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


You call that a knife?

rockcity
Jan 16, 2004


That is a scimitar.

Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

Nothing shows off how soft stainless steel is more than a scalloped bread knife. Bread knives are single sided, meaning that the edge is 15 or 20 instead of 30 to 40 for a regular knife, making it thinner and more susceptible to falling out of true. On top of that, the edge has scallops or teeth, making it even more susceptible to bending. Imagine a regular knife with a full edge is a line of people holding hands, and your cutting board and food are linebackers attempting to knock down the people in your line. Eventually they will knock people over, but it will take a while because the people are holding hands and supporting each other. A scalloped knife on the other hand is like imagining people standing in line but not holding hands, getting knocked down every time the linebacker comes for them. I was cutting a loaf of bread with a brand new bread knife and after cutting 3 slices i noticed the edge already had rolled.

Mordecai Sanchez
Jul 21, 2009



I just bought the Victorinox chef's knife to replace the crappy chef's knife in my starter block set. Now my question is: How do you safely dispose of a chef's knife? I have a dumpster out back and just tossing it in there doesn't seem right and googling how to do it will probably put me on a watch list.

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Steve Yun
Aug 7, 2003

I
ANALYZE
CARTOONS


Grimey Drawer

Sharpen it one last time and give it away for free on Facebook

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