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wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

The steel in the Victorinox paring knife must be cheap as hell because it does not hold an edge at all. It is very thin so it cuts even when it starts to dull. The Dexter equivalent is about $3 at my local kitchen supply.

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emotive
Dec 26, 2006



Just came across this knife and it looks pretty interesting. The chef's knife looks pretty cool too. Anyone have any experience with the Kanso line? Not worth the money?

https://shun.kaiusaltd.com/knives/k...n-utility-knife

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Kanso is IIRC their entry line. Shun makes good knives. You can find those at crate & barrel to see if you like the feel which is imo an advantage over blind buying. Whether worth the money is up to you.

Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



Shun makes nice stuff. A little pricy, but the quality is good.

One thing that's going to stick out to people here is: that's a lot of money to spend on a 6" knife. Most people use a chef's knife and a paring knife. 8" is better for a main knife, but a lot of people eventually go up to a 10" chef's knife.

Tom Gorman
Apr 30, 2004

Out here, everything hurts

Hey folks. I found this huge chef at a yard sale today for the price of One American Dollar.

All I have is a sharpening stone set I got for christmas. Is this something I can at least partially restore without a grinder or is the only hope to send it off somewhere for repair? I guess I could buy a grinder...

My worry is the broken tip. I have no idea how to fix that or what it takes. I'm not a knife enthusiast.

Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



Just sharpen the edge. I don't speak Japanese to know exactly what that is, but it's a carbon steel gyuto of some sort. To "fix" the tip you could see if your coarsest sharpening stone would let you remove that.

Symetrique
Jan 1, 2013


Pretty sure its a Tojiro ITK gyuto

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Symetrique posted:

Pretty sure its a Tojiro ITK gyuto



Nah the kanji is different. But it's still a gyuto. It's an older tojiro of a different model

CrazyLittle fucked around with this message at Jul 12, 2018 around 05:38

Scott808
Jul 11, 2001


Tom Gorman posted:

Hey folks. I found this huge chef at a yard sale today for the price of One American Dollar.

All I have is a sharpening stone set I got for christmas. Is this something I can at least partially restore without a grinder or is the only hope to send it off somewhere for repair? I guess I could buy a grinder...

My worry is the broken tip. I have no idea how to fix that or what it takes. I'm not a knife enthusiast.



Rub the spine on the stone at a 90 degree angle (cutting edge facing straight up) until you bring the spine down until you have a tip again. Face the tip away from you and push and pull the knife, slightly raise the handle as you pull towards you, lower as you push away - you're trying to blend in with the existing shape of the curve of the spine down to the tip. Observe your stone carefully because this can gouge the stone. Some people use the side of the stone instead of the normal sharpening surface. If you don't have a coarse enough stone or want to avoid gouging your stones you can probably use a brick or the sidewalk to do the bulk of the dirty work to get the tip back.

If you don't mind changing the shape of the edge you can do the same thing to the cutting side; or mix and match from both the spine and edge. Once you have the tip back sharpen the edge normally.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





Chemmy posted:

One thing that's going to stick out to people here is: Most people use a chef's knife and a paring knife. 8" is better for a main knife, but a lot of people eventually go up to a 10" chef's knife.

disagree fwiw

my breakdown on knife usage is 70% 6.5in santoku, 10% cleaver, 10% 10in chef knife/gyoto, 10% everything else

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Yeah I prefer a smaller santoku.

SubG
Aug 19, 2004

It's a hard world for little things.


Scott808 posted:

Rub the spine on the stone at a 90 degree angle (cutting edge facing straight up) until you bring the spine down until you have a tip again. Face the tip away from you and push and pull the knife, slightly raise the handle as you pull towards you, lower as you push away - you're trying to blend in with the existing shape of the curve of the spine down to the tip. Observe your stone carefully because this can gouge the stone. Some people use the side of the stone instead of the normal sharpening surface. If you don't have a coarse enough stone or want to avoid gouging your stones you can probably use a brick or the sidewalk to do the bulk of the dirty work to get the tip back.
You could also go to your local home improvement store and pick up a couple sheets of coarse sandpaper for like a buck.

Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



mindphlux posted:

disagree fwiw

my breakdown on knife usage is 70% 6.5in santoku, 10% cleaver, 10% 10in chef knife/gyoto, 10% everything else

That's weird. I feel like anything shorter than 10" is cramped now. My breakdown is probably 80% 10" gyuto, 15% 8" chef's knife (it's stainless so I use it for certain stuff), 5% paring knife (mostly cutting fruit in half).

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


CrazyLittle posted:

Nah the kanji is different. But it's still a gyuto. It's an older tojiro of a different model

https://www.amazon.com/Tojiro-Finis...u/dp/B00G5HBRW2

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





Chemmy posted:

That's weird. I feel like anything shorter than 10" is cramped now. My breakdown is probably 80% 10" gyuto, 15% 8" chef's knife (it's stainless so I use it for certain stuff), 5% paring knife (mostly cutting fruit in half).

what do you mean by "cramped"?

there's just not much I ever have to do that requires that large a blade. I'm much more nimble boning chickens with a santoku, most of the veg/herbs I chop isn't such huge quantities that a shorter blade slows me down, the santoku is thinner and sharper so I can get more precise dices...

I'll use a cleaver or chef's knife if I'm like, cutting a big ol acorn squash, slicing a whole leg of lamb or a turkey or something, or dicing 10lbs of carrots - but for like one bunch of cilantro or chiffonading mint or mincing garlic or segmenting fruit or something, lightweight nimble and fast push-cutting just feels right to me.

Wonderllama
Mar 15, 2003



Is there a big enough difference to buy shun Fuji line instead of the shun premier? I like the size and weight of the Fuji, but that price upsell

fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

mindphlux posted:

what do you mean by "cramped"?

there's just not much I ever have to do that requires that large a blade. I'm much more nimble boning chickens with a santoku, most of the veg/herbs I chop isn't such huge quantities that a shorter blade slows me down, the santoku is thinner and sharper so I can get more precise dices...

I'll use a cleaver or chef's knife if I'm like, cutting a big ol acorn squash, slicing a whole leg of lamb or a turkey or something, or dicing 10lbs of carrots - but for like one bunch of cilantro or chiffonading mint or mincing garlic or segmenting fruit or something, lightweight nimble and fast push-cutting just feels right to me.

I primarily use my 8 inch gyuto, op

fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

Speaking of, back in April I got an 8" carbon steel Masamoto from the Tsukiji shop in Tokyo and I just took it to the stone for the first time for sharpening on my own. It's crazy how easy it is to put a good edge on this thing, but my only other references are a Victorinox Fibrox or some cheap crap knives

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


Wonderllama posted:

Is there a big enough difference to buy shun Fuji line instead of the shun premier? I like the size and weight of the Fuji, but that price upsell
Except for the blue steel shuns I think it's just fit and finish. Buy what's comfortable imho

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





so, I posted a thread a while back about doing ceramics

I've sort of been running out of ideas on what to do next in my ceramics studio. I work almost exclusively with porcelain, and I make an inordinate amount of bowls and teacups and vases and boring poo poo. looking for some inspiration, and I remembered ceramic blades were a thing.

does anyone know much about how porcelain blades are made? if I hand-cast a sorta flat, knife shaped thing and put it through a kiln and ground it down and poo poo, would I basically be making a ceramic blade ala the commercial process?

I don't think I'd ever pay money for a ceramic blade, but the novelty of making one myself...

fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

mindphlux posted:

so, I posted a thread a while back about doing ceramics

I've sort of been running out of ideas on what to do next in my ceramics studio. I work almost exclusively with porcelain, and I make an inordinate amount of bowls and teacups and vases and boring poo poo. looking for some inspiration, and I remembered ceramic blades were a thing.

does anyone know much about how porcelain blades are made? if I hand-cast a sorta flat, knife shaped thing and put it through a kiln and ground it down and poo poo, would I basically be making a ceramic blade ala the commercial process?

I don't think I'd ever pay money for a ceramic blade, but the novelty of making one myself...

I don't know, op.

Yond Cassius
May 22, 2010



mindphlux posted:

so, I posted a thread a while back about doing ceramics

I've sort of been running out of ideas on what to do next in my ceramics studio. I work almost exclusively with porcelain, and I make an inordinate amount of bowls and teacups and vases and boring poo poo. looking for some inspiration, and I remembered ceramic blades were a thing.

does anyone know much about how porcelain blades are made? if I hand-cast a sorta flat, knife shaped thing and put it through a kiln and ground it down and poo poo, would I basically be making a ceramic blade ala the commercial process?

I don't think I'd ever pay money for a ceramic blade, but the novelty of making one myself...

Are you talking about ceramic knives like Kyocera makes, or something different?

Ceramic knives aren't made from porcelain like you'd normally use; they're made from zirconium-rich, high-temperature ceramics, so a homemade knife wouldn't have the same properties, any more than a knife made from scavenged rebar might have the same properties as a high-tech supersteel.

That said, yes, the sharpening process is pretty recognizable. You'd have to use diamond stones due to the hardness. Kyocera has a little video about it if you're curious, though it's not especially rich with details. It would be a neat project if nothing else!

poverty goat
Feb 15, 2004

Let me tell you a thing or two about GhostCoin

what do you do with expensive japanese knives after you make the transition to using a $30 chinese cleaver for everything?

poverty goat fucked around with this message at Jul 17, 2018 around 12:08

Oldsrocket_27
Apr 28, 2009


poverty goat posted:

what do you do with expensive japanese knives after you make the transition to using a $30 chinese cleaver for everything?

You could always just send them all to me.

Or sell them, or keep them as a nice collection because you enjoy the craftsmanship, or force yourself to bring them into a rotation to practice with different styles of knives.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



i've already got a pretty big tojiro ITK kiritsuke but i've found this and I'm real tempted

https://thesharpchef.co.uk/collecti...grinding-finish

ItBreathes
Jan 6, 2013


poverty goat posted:

what do you do with expensive japanese knives after you make the transition to using a $30 chinese cleaver for everything?

Hang onto them for the rare occasion you want to slice something real thin? Of course, I'm using a $10 cleaver that's more wedge than knife, a better cleaver could probably do fine cuts too.

Hopper
Dec 28, 2004

BOOING! BOOING!

Grimey Drawer

2 questions:

1. I bought a wetstone because I am fed up with our knufes getting dull and sharpening costs a fortune here. I have watched some videos on youtube how to do it.
Is there any pro tip for how to judge the angle your holding thr knife at?

2. Somebody donated 2 brand new knife sets (chinese cleaver, santoku, pairing, bread, chef, filetting and 1 weird knife plus a honing steel and a meat fork) to our red cross charity clothes do. Since we are not allowed to hand out knifes they gave me one set to take home. It tried googling the brand "AMC Meisterbach" but came up with a lot warnings for fakes so I suspect it's one of those bogus "I have leftover stock from a trade fare wanna buy straight out of my boot" things and the donor was scammed especially since the "fancy gurantee card" has a set number but no adress or anything.

Is there any way to find out whether those are servicable? Right now I figure I'll just use them and if they suck I can bin them. I am only using them for home cooking anyway. But can I take them to a shop to have them "rated" or something?

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Chemmy
Feb 4, 2001



quote:

Is there any pro tip for how to judge the angle your holding thr knife at?

Take a sharpie and color the beveled edge of the knife. Pass it over the stone. If you got all the sharpie off you're at the correct angle.

http://www.spyderco.com/forumII/viewtopic.php?t=52105

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