Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«9 »
  • Post
  • Reply
fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

Jose posted:

taking your shoes off at the door is normal

This as heck

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Scott808
Jul 11, 2001


NPR Journalizard posted:

I was recently gifted a very nice, very sharp knife with a bevel on one side only and everytime I use it, I can't cut straight down. I figure I'm doing something wrong, but I don't know what and how to fix it.

Do I need to hold it differently, or put more pressure on different parts? It seems to cut away from the bevel side, which is the right hand side.

Single bevel knives inherently steer the way you're describing.

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



Can anyone sell me on any particular sub-$100 Nakiri? I've been looking at the Tojiro DP, MAC Professional, and a few random carbon steel ones as well (I do not own any Carbon knives yet so I haven't worked with those before). I'm just sort of sitting here with choice paralysis at the moment on what to pick up.

How big of a factor is weight for a knife typically? If a lighter knife is less fatiguing for doing a significant amount of cutting and mincing then I'm all for that.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


what kind of handle do you like? That's going to be the most important difference at that price point.

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



I'm fine with Oval (have a chef knife with one of those), but I have no opinion on D or Wa shaped handles since I've not owned any knives with those (only briefly held at a store once). I'm right handed if that matters.
Don't prefer whatever style it is Wustov Classic's are (box? square?).

I'm pretty flexible on material, as long as it doesn't feel cheap in my hands. If it comes down to just that, I'd probably take whichever one looks nicer.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


I have different knives from these smiths that I like. The second has a slightly odd not perpendicular end. https://www.chefknivestogo.com/giwh2na16.html or https://www.chefknivestogo.com/okbl2na16.html

d handle and single bevel https://www.chefknivestogo.com/kijona16.html

otherwise get a tojiro.

/e- I don't think weight matters outside of a professional kitchen where you know what you'll be chopping many many lbs of. But a heavier knife can just be "dropped" on certain ingredients but may wedge on certain things too (since they'll generally be wider). Better on bone too but it's a nakiri so you won't be doing that regardless.

Submarine Sandpaper fucked around with this message at Aug 3, 2018 around 15:07

Gwyrgyn Blood
Dec 17, 2002



I'm eyeing that first one right now, going to give it a little more thought first but that's the one I'm leaning towards right now.

As far as caring for Carbon Steel goes, is a ceramic honing rod fine? And how often should I use mineral oil on it, every use/day or less often?

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


you'll eventually need to do a stone sharpening like any knife but a ceramic rod is fine for carbon. Stropping is a bit better for the edge since the rod removes some metal. I've never used oil on my knives but I've used bee's wax on my handles.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



tojiro ITK's are carbon steel and usually the same price as the DP range fwiw

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004

by FactsAreUseless


Jose posted:

taking your shoes off at the door is normal

lol nice troll, my neckbearded friendo

fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

lol I was just sharpening my knives while watching TV and totally sliced up my finger

fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

They're pretty sharp now though

Hopper
Dec 28, 2004

BOOING! BOOING!

Grimey Drawer

fart simpson posted:

This as heck

Same.

"Hey, how about you come in with half the worlds dirt under your shoes and walk all over our house" said nobody ever except in the US

It's prefectly normal to me to take off my shoes before entering anyone's place.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



I share a house with asians and have a nice setup for everones shoes and slippers near the door. The floors do stay remarkably cleaner than what I remember growing up in a shoes-on household. Not USA.

fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

Ranter posted:

I share a house with asians and have a nice setup for everones shoes and slippers near the door. The floors do stay remarkably cleaner than what I remember growing up in a shoes-on household. Not USA.

Literally same except asians is singular instead of plural.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004

by FactsAreUseless


nigga just use ur american redblooded spending to buy a roomba and stop imposing misery and implied moral highground ethical shame on your houseguests ffs

rude

(USER WAS BANNED FOR THIS POST)

SHOAH NUFF
Nov 14, 2005
I SHOULD PUT MY SHITTY POSTS IN TO A .TXT INSTEAD OF HERE

only uncultured white Americans let guests walk around with dirty shoes. The soles of your shoes have stepped in piss in public bathrooms and you want to stomp around on my nice carpet? gently caress outta here

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004



Fun Shoe

How about y'all go make a shoes in the house thread over in GBS instead of debating it in the kitchen knives thread?

fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

Liquid Communism posted:

How about y'all go make a shoes in the house thread over in GBS instead of debating it in the kitchen knives thread?

There isn't a real debate anyway. Taking off your shoes is incredibly obvious.

(USER WAS PUT ON PROBATION FOR THIS POST)

aejix
Sep 18, 2007

It's about finding that next group of core players we can win with in the next 6, 8, 10 years. Let's face it, it's hard for 20-, 21-, 22-year-olds to lead an NHL team. Look at the playoffs.

That quote is from fucking 2018. Fuck you Jim


I scored a set of 6 global knives and a dual-grit (400 and 1000) whetstone. hosed if i can get the knives sharp enough to shave with though.

Is that a practice/technique problem or is 1000 grit not sufficient to get that fine of an edge on them

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


1000 grit isn't going to give you a very refined edge. It should be sharp for kitchen use. I'd recommend stropping or honing if razor sharp is actually your goal. It could just be aligned all fucky and weird. A cheap, good, high grit finishing-stone and strop in one is simply a piece of balsa wood, and some 1 micron dia-paste. It's the equivalent of 14,000 grit. It's not bad to shell out for a separate polishing stone either. I get fussy about the finish on my blades, and 300 to 1000 to 10000 to balsa to leather gets an insanely sharp edge. I joke that my Chinese cleaver is sharp enough to shave the electrons off an atom, but it really does feel like the knife does it's own thing and I just have to guide it. I guess I should have asked first: are you forming a bead on both sides of the stone?

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Babylon Astronaut posted:

I guess I should have asked first: are you forming a bead on both sides of the stone?

I googled this question but didnt find an answer, what does it mean?

Scott808
Jul 11, 2001


Stangg posted:

I googled this question but didnt find an answer, what does it mean?

I've never heard it referred to as a bead, but I think he means forming a burr. I assume asking if a burr was raised using both grits of the stone.

aejix posted:

I scored a set of 6 global knives and a dual-grit (400 and 1000) whetstone. hosed if i can get the knives sharp enough to shave with though.

Is that a practice/technique problem or is 1000 grit not sufficient to get that fine of an edge on them

Is this a random brand stone which are found all over Amazon?

Stangg
Mar 17, 2009


Scott808 posted:

I've never heard it referred to as a bead, but I think he means forming a burr. I assume asking if a burr was raised using both grits of the stone.

That makes sense, watching a video on checking for a burr really made everything click for me when using stones to sharpen my knives.

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


That's hilarious. At least I didn't call it a flashing. Anyway, with a stone that coarse, you need to form a burr, or you do not have the edge typical to that grit. Around 8-10k, you might just be polishing an forming a burr isn't a big deal. De-burr when you're done, or you'll get metal in your food.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


iirc from when I was looking up how far I needed to take razors, human hair is cut easily at about 1 micron or the 14000 grit with skin between .5 and 1. You'll likely be able to "pop" a hair after a good sharpening on the 1k and then polishing with very light pressure and a lot of slurry.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


I left for a couple weeks and my parents left my admittedly cheapo knife dull as gently caress.

What is a good 2-3 stones I can buy to get my knives to a reasonable sharpness? I don't need it sharp enough to split atoms or anything, just to cut comfortably.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

totalnewbie posted:

I left for a couple weeks and my parents left my admittedly cheapo knife dull as gently caress.

What is a good 2-3 stones I can buy to get my knives to a reasonable sharpness? I don't need it sharp enough to split atoms or anything, just to cut comfortably.

I use a Spyderco Sharpmaker. Does the job for me but you have to be careful not to round over the tip.

Babylon Astronaut
Apr 19, 2012


Honestly, if you're just doing fruits and veg and basic meat cutting and you don't need to split atoms, you can get a $10 accusharp v sharpener and be completely fine. It removes waaaay too much metal for something you want to last a life time, and will make one kind of bevel, but if you're using "wedding present" knives, they work great. The cons are they wear your knives, you won't be able to shave with it, and you need to be aware of metal filings. It will also permanently ruin high carbon steel, or anything with a custom bevel. A 10 dollar accusharp and a 12 dollar greben 8 inch chef knife is enough for even most professional cooks.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Babylon Astronaut posted:

Honestly, if you're just doing fruits and veg and basic meat cutting and you don't need to split atoms, you can get a $10 accusharp v sharpener and be completely fine. It removes waaaay too much metal for something you want to last a life time, and will make one kind of bevel, but if you're using "wedding present" knives, they work great. The cons are they wear your knives, you won't be able to shave with it, and you need to be aware of metal filings. It will also permanently ruin high carbon steel, or anything with a custom bevel. A 10 dollar accusharp and a 12 dollar greben 8 inch chef knife is enough for even most professional cooks.

I do want something a little better than a V sharpener. I want one day to get some better knives and take care of them nicely, so I want this to be a first step.

wormil posted:

I use a Spyderco Sharpmaker. Does the job for me but you have to be careful not to round over the tip.

Same as above, I'd like to see if I can get a couple real stones to use? I'm not sure how keen I am on this type of sharpening motion :/

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

totalnewbie posted:

Same as above, I'd like to see if I can get a couple real stones to use? I'm not sure how keen I am on this type of sharpening motion :/

I don't know a lot about stones but one brand I hear about constantly is Shapton, as in people bragging about them.

https://www.chefknivestogo.com/shpro10.html

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


For everyday honing I have a long diamond hone, it works very well. Like this (just showing the principle, not a recommendation of this particular product, some reviews say it sucks):
https://www.amazon.com/Wiitek-Diamo...l/dp/B011NRQRFK

And then also a plain knife steel. That's enough to maintain the knife for a good long while.

Then you occasionally need to regrind the blade to remove nicks and wear, I have acquired a tormek style wet grinder for that, it's rotary so it will be a hollow grind profile, some people like straight or convex grinds. But hollow grinds are nice IMO, easy to hone by hand and find the right angle. That might be overkill and too expensive for you however.

I have arkansas oil stones as well, one soft and one black which I use to sharpen woodworking equipment but they also work on knives and I have used them to sharpen knives, I keep the stones in my shop though so they seldom get used for kitchen duty. I like them over water stones because I think water stones are messy and need constant flattening. You could re-profile a knife with a coarse stone and patience, doing it by hand will most likely result in a convex grind as it's hard to maintain an exact angle, or use a jig that holds the stone.

Diamond stones are also an option (DMT for instance).

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

The Victorinox 8" chefs knife is $28 right now on Amazon.

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


His Divine Shadow posted:

For everyday honing I have a long diamond hone, it works very well. Like this (just showing the principle, not a recommendation of this particular product, some reviews say it sucks):
https://www.amazon.com/Wiitek-Diamo...l/dp/B011NRQRFK

And then also a plain knife steel. That's enough to maintain the knife for a good long while.

Then you occasionally need to regrind the blade to remove nicks and wear, I have acquired a tormek style wet grinder for that, it's rotary so it will be a hollow grind profile, some people like straight or convex grinds. But hollow grinds are nice IMO, easy to hone by hand and find the right angle. That might be overkill and too expensive for you however.

I have arkansas oil stones as well, one soft and one black which I use to sharpen woodworking equipment but they also work on knives and I have used them to sharpen knives, I keep the stones in my shop though so they seldom get used for kitchen duty. I like them over water stones because I think water stones are messy and need constant flattening. You could re-profile a knife with a coarse stone and patience, doing it by hand will most likely result in a convex grind as it's hard to maintain an exact angle, or use a jig that holds the stone.

Diamond stones are also an option (DMT for instance).
I disagree with the bolded wrt course water stones. Water stones tend to cut faster than oil and you'll only pull a convex if you do not keep the stones flat after not much practice.

Just a shapton 1k would be a good starting point. If you find yourself at it for longer than you'd like get a courser stone. You don't really need more than a 1k on most kitchen knives.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005

OFFICIAL BITCH OF DANBO DAXTER




Oven Wrangler

wormil posted:

The Victorinox 8" chefs knife is $28 right now on Amazon.

I've been thinking about buying an affordable knife so that I can start practicing sharpening for real instead of just using the normal "pull through" garbage that I have been using. I guess this is as good as any. Thanks.

totalnewbie
Nov 13, 2005

I was born and raised in China, lived in Japan, and now hold a US passport.

I am wrong in every way, all the damn time.

Ask me about my tattoos.


Well that's the second time Shapton's been mentioned, so I guess I'll get some of their stones.

I don't mind picking up 2-3 stones instead of just one. Shapton recommends 1000 + 5000 for chef's knifes - I guess I can just go with these two and call it a day? Any reason to pick up a more coarse or fine grit?

totalnewbie fucked around with this message at Aug 14, 2018 around 17:28

Ultimate Mango
Jan 18, 2005

She's a sharkmouth clam
beware
she is


totalnewbie posted:

Well that's the second time Shapton's been mentioned, so I guess I'll get some of their stones.

I don't mind picking up 2-3 stones instead of just one. Shapton recommends 1000 + 5000 for chef's knifes - I guess I can just go with these two and call it a day? Any reason to pick up a more coarse or fine grit?

I would also be interested in this answer. I have a Spyderco sharpmaker (over a decade of use) and am ready to try stones.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

You can flip the Sharpmaker case over, it has a spot for the triangle rods so you can use them like a flat stone.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007

ASK ME ABOUT HOW I GHOULISHLY CELEBRATE THE DEATH OF CHILDREN TO TEACH THEIR PARENTS "A LESSON"


If your stuff is real dull you'll want a more coarse stone. After you get all yours sharp then you won't really need it much. You can use them to flatten your other stones too. I have https://www.chefknivestogo.com/inpipopro220.html in the brick size and it's real nice but a little loud.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«9 »