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Al!
Apr 2, 2010





pa..ul rud d\d

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smallmouth
Oct 1, 2009



That looks cool.

Shinmera
Mar 25, 2013



Yam Slacker

Finally got the time and mood to draw again.

https://twitter.com/Shinmera/status/962330819749654528

Tried to put some of the advice I got from here into practise, though I'm not sure if it shows.

Al!
Apr 2, 2010





smallmouth posted:

That looks cool.



i was going for kind of a francis bacon thing

my buddy Superfly
Feb 28, 2011



Al! posted:

pa..ul rud d\d



Can you give me a print out of oyster smiling?

https://twitter.com/rainbowfission/...395769671122944

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Shinmera posted:

Finally got the time and mood to draw again.

https://twitter.com/Shinmera/status/962330819749654528

Tried to put some of the advice I got from here into practise, though I'm not sure if it shows.

Looks great!

Here is a daily doodle. Lately I have been too lazy to scan and I just take a phone cam pic. Sorry if things have been a little blurry lately. I usually have to take 2-3 pics before I get a decent one in low light.



and another zbrush doodle. Practicing hard surface modeling techniques. Would anyone join in a daily 3d doodle thread? A la Beeple?

Al!
Apr 2, 2010





a couple of spooky ghosts

d3c0y2
Sep 29, 2009




So I've been spending today trying to really self analysis my drawing. And one thing I'm aware off is that I always hold a sort of wire frame head in my imagination whilst drawing. Something that sort of holds the different planes together so I can understand lighting.

But I wondered how accurate my imagined head is. So I drew it out, trying to clearly demonstrate were frames split and change angle.

Now that I've got it in front of me I'm starting to think that if I update this mental image of bare bones head, then I may be able to get better looking drawings in future.

Are there any glaring planes I've missed, or any planes that are inaccurate to how a face should be?

Neon Noodle
Nov 11, 2016

there's nothing wrong here in montana

The planes are approximately correct but your proportions are way off.

d3c0y2
Sep 29, 2009


Yeah proportion is something I've basically been winging this entire time. I've watched a number of tutorials on the anatomy of facial features, but I've struggled to find a class on YouTube that deals specifically with proportion (that hasn't been to cartooney)

It is particularly bad in that pic because I was focusing mainly on getting every plane down, but I'm never great at it.

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



d3c0y2 posted:

Yeah proportion is something I've basically been winging this entire time. I've watched a number of tutorials on the anatomy of facial features, but I've struggled to find a class on YouTube that deals specifically with proportion (that hasn't been to cartooney)

It is particularly bad in that pic because I was focusing mainly on getting every plane down, but I'm never great at it.
Vitruvius Pollio's proportions from his books on architecture, while rather idealized in a Classical manner, are a very good starting point (it's a good idea to compare these measurements with real faces/bodies to see where real people vary, though):

quote:

CHAPTER I: ON SYMMETRY: IN TEMPLES AND IN THE HUMAN BODY

1. THE design of a temple depends on symmetry, the principles of which must be most carefully observed by the architect. They are due to proportion, in Greek ἀναλογία. Proportion is a correspondence among the measures of the members of an entire work, and of the whole to a certain part selected as standard. From this result the principles of symmetry. Without symmetry and proportion there can be no principles in the design of any temple; that is, if there is no precise relation between its members, as in the case of those of a well shaped man.

2. For the human body is so designed by nature that the face, from the chin to the top of the forehead and the lowest roots of the hair, is a tenth part of the whole height; the open hand from the wrist to the tip of the middle finger is just the same; the head from the chin to the crown is an eighth, and with the neck and shoulder from the top of the breast to the lowest roots of the hair is a sixth; from the middle of the breast to the summit of the crown is a fourth. If we take the height of the face itself, the distance from the bottom of the chin to the under side of the nostrils is one third of it; the nose from the under side of the nostrils to a line between the eyebrows is the same; from there to the lowest roots of the hair is also a third, comprising the forehead. The length of the foot is one sixth of the height of the body; of the forearm, one fourth; and the breadth of the breast is also one fourth. The other members, too, have their own symmetrical proportions, and it was by employing them that the famous painters and sculptors of antiquity attained to great and endless renown.

3. Similarly, in the members of a temple there ought to be the greatest harmony in the symmetrical relations of the different parts to the general magnitude of the whole. Then again, in the human body the central point is naturally the navel. For if a man be placed flat on his back, with his hands and feet extended,, and a pair of compasses centred at his navel, the fingers and toes of his two hands and feet will touch the circumference of a circle described therefrom. And just as the human body yields a circular outline, so too a square figure may be found from it. For if we measure the distance from the soles of the feet to the top of the head, and then apply that measure to the outstretched arms, the breadth will be found to be the same as the height, as in the case of plane surfaces which are perfectly square.

4. Therefore, since nature has designed the human body so that its members are duly proportioned to the frame as a whole, it appears that the ancients had good reason for their rule, that in perfect buildings the different members must be in exact symmetrical relations to the whole general scheme. Hence, while transmitting to us the proper arrangements for buildings of all kinds, they were particularly careful to do so in the case of temples of the gods, buildings in which merits and faults usually last forever.

e: Vitruvius writes of a head, from crown to chin, as one eighth of a man's total height. Note that in realistic proportions, this is somewhat uncommon (typically seen on tall men with smaller heads). Typical head-to-body ratios are somewhere between 1:8 to 1:6.5 for men and between 1:7.5 to 1:6 for women, as far as I can tell.

e:2 This is for people of adult height. Drawing kids with those proportions will look weird. Their head-body ratios will be more like 1:6 to 1:4

e:3 also for any anatomical proportion reference, compare it to yourself if you can to test if it's sort of accurate or off.

a hole-y ghost fucked around with this message at Feb 10, 2018 around 23:22

Al!
Apr 2, 2010





more ghost stuff

Sharpest Crayon
Jul 16, 2009

Always Wag. Always Friend. Very Safety.


Grimey Drawer

Did someone say DOGS? no? Think about DOGS real loud? YEAH!



This is my doggo and she's a very good girl.

Brazilianpeanutwar
Aug 27, 2015

Spent my walletfull, on a jpeg, desolate, will croberts make a whale of me yet?


Sharpest Crayon posted:

Did someone say DOGS? no? Think about DOGS real loud? YEAH!



This is my doggo and she's a very good girl.
Wow,that's amazing! good job

d3c0y2
Sep 29, 2009


a hole-y ghost posted:

Vitruvius Pollio's proportions from his books on architecture, while rather idealized in a Classical manner, are a very good starting point (it's a good idea to compare these measurements with real faces/bodies to see where real people vary, though):


e: Vitruvius writes of a head, from crown to chin, as one eighth of a man's total height. Note that in realistic proportions, this is somewhat uncommon (typically seen on tall men with smaller heads). Typical head-to-body ratios are somewhere between 1:8 to 1:6.5 for men and between 1:7.5 to 1:6 for women, as far as I can tell.

e:2 This is for people of adult height. Drawing kids with those proportions will look weird. Their head-body ratios will be more like 1:6 to 1:4

e:3 also for any anatomical proportion reference, compare it to yourself if you can to test if it's sort of accurate or off.

Thanks man I appreciate it. Is it worth buying any of his collected works on amazon do you think?

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



d3c0y2 posted:

Thanks man I appreciate it. Is it worth buying any of his collected works on amazon do you think?
Eh, his books are primarily on architecture and unless you're studying architecture, probably not of much use on the whole. Also, his stuff is all available for free online (I copied that passage from http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper...3&lang=original).

That passage I quoted was probably the most useful thing from him re: human proportions, but it's a pretty good one.

e: Also, not totally relevant to d3c0y2's question, but for anyone else looking for drawing instructional material, I thought I might add:

In general on buying stuff to learn drawing, I'd say to keep in mind that, especially for the basics, a lot of the really good references will have been written by people who are long dead and therefore their stuff is in the public domain. Here is a list of public domain drawing instruction books I found: http://uncannycreativity.com/downlo...ks-for-artists/

In particular I'm partial to Ruskin, here's a free ebook of his: https://books.google.com/books?id=8...bnail&q&f=false

a hole-y ghost fucked around with this message at Feb 11, 2018 around 00:39

d3c0y2
Sep 29, 2009


a hole-y ghost posted:

Eh, his books are primarily on architecture and unless you're studying architecture, probably not of much use on the whole. Also, his stuff is all available for free online (I copied that passage from http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper...3&lang=original).

That passage I quoted was probably the most useful thing from him re: human proportions, but it's a pretty good one.

Ah no worries. I'll read through it anyway when I have time, my degree is in Political Philosophy so I loving love reading Classical works.

But sometimes I feel like I'm always playing catch-up and like I have vast gulfs of knowledge. I've basically got no education in art outside of high school classes, so anything I've learned has either been from tutorials I've found, or from asking questions in places like this. But I'm sure there's an absolute gently caress ton of stuff I don't know, and don't know it even exists to try and learn it.

It's getting better now as I've signed up to a few places; and it's nice to be able to look at more experienced artists and learn from them. But I really do appreciate it when people are critical of what i've drawn, because it's going to be the fastest way to improve!

So thanks to everyone in this thread for helping me!

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



d3c0y2 posted:

Ah no worries. I'll read through it anyway, my degree is in Political Philosophy so I loving love reading Classical works.

But sometimes I feel like I'm always playing catch-up and like I have vast gulfs of knowledge. I've basically got no education in art outside of high school classes, so anything I've learned has either been from tutorials I've found, or from asking questions in places like this. But I'm sure there's an absolute gently caress ton of stuff I don't know, and don't know it even exists to try and learn it.

It's getting better now as I've signed up to a few places; and it's nice to be able to look at more experienced artists and learn from them. But I really do appreciate it when people are critical of what i've drawn, because it's going to be the fastest way to improve!

So thanks to everyone in this thread for helping me!
Hey, don't sweat it. You're learning fast, a lot faster than most, I think. Drawing's one of those things for which there is so much to learn that you certainly have no hope of learning even a significant amount of what you could want to in your lifetime. Some find that depressing, but I think it actually takes the pressure off.

e: wow that was a really odd sentence I wrote but hopefully the meaning comes across

d3c0y2
Sep 29, 2009


a hole-y ghost posted:

Hey, don't sweat it. You're learning fast, a lot faster than most, I think. Drawing's one of those things for which there is so much to learn that you certainly have no hope of learning even a significant amount of what you could want to in your lifetime. Some find that depressing, but I think it actually takes the pressure off.

e: wow that was a really odd sentence I wrote but hopefully the meaning comes across

Well, even though I've got no formal education in art, I've spend a lot of time in academia so I'm used to boring, longwinded lessons and stuffy books that never seem to end. I think I've just got a strong tolerance for the "boring" side of repetitive practice, I've taken to taking a sketchbook with me whenever I go out. Even if it's just 10-15 mins on a bus I'll draw a few eyes, or practice some lips. It's not exciting, but it's nice to flick through the book and see the improvement.

But what I really needed was more lessons/things to read so this:

a hole-y ghost posted:


e: Also, not totally relevant to d3c0y2's question, but for anyone else looking for drawing instructional material, I thought I might add:

In general on buying stuff to learn drawing, I'd say to keep in mind that, especially for the basics, a lot of the really good references will have been written by people who are long dead and therefore their stuff is in the public domain. Here is a list of public domain drawing instruction books I found: http://uncannycreativity.com/downlo...ks-for-artists/

In particular I'm partial to Ruskin, here's a free ebook of his: https://books.google.com/books?id=8...bnail&q&f=false

Is absolutely perfect for me. There's no replacement for doing the legwork in my mind, so I guess I'll have a lot of reading material over the next month or two!

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



d3c0y2 posted:

Is absolutely perfect for me. There's no replacement for doing the legwork in my mind, so I guess I'll have a lot of reading material over the next month or two!
hey glad to help, friend

Also, sorry that I keep posting and not putting drawings here. So as to avoid angering the gods of the drawing thread (i.e. Crayon) here's a crop from an body study I'm working on now:

d3c0y2
Sep 29, 2009


a hole-y ghost posted:

hey glad to help, friend

Also, sorry that I keep posting and not putting drawings here. So as to avoid angering the gods of the drawing thread (i.e. Crayon) here's a crop from an body study I'm working on now:


This is real cool. Your brush strokes almost remind me of Goya at times.

And Oh boy Ruskin writes like an old fashioned recipe book. Going of on tangents about the education of children and all sorts, I love it. I've put pretty much all the books you linked on my kindle, time to hoover up some knowledge!

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



d3c0y2 posted:

This is real cool. Your brush strokes almost remind me of Goya at times.

And Oh boy Ruskin writes like an old fashioned recipe book. Going of on tangents about the education of children and all sorts, I love it. I've put pretty much all the books you linked on my kindle, time to hoover up some knowledge!
thanks friend!! Yeah... Ruskin is great, haha

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



I've been doing little coral shaped things to psyche myself up into finishing a bigger piece.





d3c0y2
Sep 29, 2009


a hole-y ghost posted:

thanks friend!! Yeah... Ruskin is great, haha

Yeah he is. I've always had a bit of a curiosity with him since my sister got married in his country house in the Lake District.

He had a beautiful home in the middle of loving nowhere.

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



d3c0y2 posted:

Yeah he is. I've always had a bit of a curiosity with him since my sister got married in his country house in the Lake District.
whoa!!! that's cool.

anyways

hercules

d3c0y2
Sep 29, 2009


I loving love that pic.

All your pictures seem to have that classic grecian profile across the brow and nose, it's so distinctive!

Feel like I'm looking at a statue in a gallery.

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



thanks! I actually referenced those last two drawings from pictures I took of statues at a local museum, heh. I'm hoping I can find time to make it over there again sometime in the next few months to sketch and take more pictures

Internet Kraken
Apr 24, 2010

slightly amused




I've never drawn fancy detailed armor before and it shows. This pic took way longer than I thought it would. Good practice though I guess.

Al! posted:

a couple of spooky ghosts



I find these to be really interesting. Weird aesthetic.

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



starting another thing that I may or may not finish. I love drawing hands

Brazilianpeanutwar
Aug 27, 2015

Spent my walletfull, on a jpeg, desolate, will croberts make a whale of me yet?


I've always wanted to do those uber detailed robot pieces,with a ton of detail on every piece,this is not one of them lol.Still happy with it though

Grouchio
Aug 31, 2014


A gift for my sister's boyfriend's birthday. I'm setting up an etsy account:

Spinster
Jul 15, 2017



I've got an idea for another joke thread, I don't have the hours and hours to properly practice drawing (MAN I know I need to)---- what kills me is perspective. I didn't for this one but what I'm going to have to do is find a photo I can use to get that, god.

Spinster
Jul 15, 2017



Sharpest Crayon posted:

Did someone say DOGS? no? Think about DOGS real loud? YEAH!



This is my doggo and she's a very good girl.

You are a MASTER at eyes.

sigma 6
Nov 27, 2004

the mirror would do well to reflect further

Did this thread start getting a lot more activity or is it my imagination?

Did a little inking on an old sketch.

GenJoe
Sep 14, 2010


here is a lady in hat

a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



^
nice hat lady!

Internet Kraken posted:

I find these to be really interesting. Weird aesthetic.
once this years thread is over i'm going to click to see all of Al!'s posts in a row and just watch them all a bunch of times, and it will be quite the experience

Al!
Apr 2, 2010





thanks, i like having a weird asethetic

more ghost gifs its a pretty fun technique and basically it's helping me practice detailed shading




edit:

then i ended up doing this for my sig lol

Al! fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2018 around 07:33

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!







I'm annoyed with this because the boob next to her arm looks like some kind of growth.

Vermain
Sep 5, 2006




TheMostFrench posted:





I'm annoyed with this because the boob next to her arm looks like some kind of growth.

The dark, arcane secret of art is that the artist is free to alter the pose - or even fudge the anatomy - for the purposes of a better picture. Does it look weird to have the boob sticking out on its own with the lighting the way it is? Change the lighting, or have her arm coming more forwards to cover it, or give her slightly broader shoulders, or lengthen her hair.

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a hole-y ghost
May 10, 2010



Vermain posted:

The dark, arcane secret of art is that the artist is free to alter the pose - or even fudge the anatomy - for the purposes of a better picture. Does it look weird to have the boob sticking out on its own with the lighting the way it is? Change the lighting, or have her arm coming more forwards to cover it, or give her slightly broader shoulders, or lengthen her hair.
what is the secret of G . O . K . U .?

e: also I'd say that what looks weird to me in that drawing is not necessarily the breast specifically but that she has a weird bulging triceps. check the angles of the edges of the arm with your reference, also the thickness and length of the upper arm and forearm, etc. once you check that you'll probably need to move the hand, breast, shoulder, etc in relation

a hole-y ghost fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2018 around 16:15

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