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TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



Jake Snake posted:



Does anyone else think it looks like her left hand is detached from her body? Also I'm really worried about that smile coming across as creepy.

I think she looks quite cheerful, and the hand is good imo, maybe a bit hard to read because her sleeve is so loose it's hard to tell where the forearm begins.

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TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



d3c0y2 posted:

Does anyone have any tips for when you seem to hit a creative slump. I really loved that Gollum pic I drew, but since then I can't seem to draw anything that doesn't look awful in my own opinion.

I dunno if I need to take a break from portraits and draw something entirely different, or try a different style. But last two days I've thrown out about four pictures when they were half done because the features seemed slightly out of position, or the proportion slightly wrong, or some other anatomical piece that's impossible to fix by the time I notice.

Even looking back on those last two drawings I feel like the eyes are slightly mismatched.

Maybe I need to practice face construction.

When I experience this I might try something totally different, like a totally different subject matter in a different medium. Then again, I might also revisit something from an earlier time and critique myself for ways to improve it, and do a kind of version 2.0 of that work.

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



Al! posted:

sometimes people actually like my sketches more than my completed drawings, this might be one of them:



Reminds me of Battlezone.

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



I've been doing little coral shaped things to psyche myself up into finishing a bigger piece.





TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!







I'm annoyed with this because the boob next to her arm looks like some kind of growth.

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



Nothing in particulars.



TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



Wowporn posted:

I got in this really stupid habit of thinking that if you drew one character a bunch it was bad cause you were just being self indulgent or doing comfort zone drawings or something, which is bad cause like............. that's how you learn how to draw something

I'm the same with visual diary stuff, I kept thinking it had to be of a finished quality to show to other people so I would rarely draw.

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



orange sky posted:

I loved drawing when I was a kid, but I stopped altogether for ... 15 years? Started recently drawing again and it's quite relaxing, even though it's stressful in a way (perspectives are really hard). Here are some of the sketches I've been doing (never mind the signatures, I apparently have some narcissistic complex that makes me sign sketches).

Been thinking of going to an intro to drawing class, I'd love to learn a bunch in some days.

---

This beach one I want to work more on. Did I mention perspective is a bitch?

Posting this here in the hopes that sharing what I'm doing will push me to do more . I've lurked this thread for a while and I've seen some great stuff.

Most of these are great starting points. The fresh produce you drew has pretty good perspective, and the beach is good too, but it feels like you've sketched it very roughly and quickly. Encourage yourself to take more time shading and creating shapes. The drawing classes I've been to recommend taking some time to view a whole scene and then start mapping out lines of perspective very lightly so that you can use them as guides to draw actual things over - having just a few guidelines will help keep everything in proportion.

You should try and find drawing channels on youtube and other places, a couple of good ones are Proko (lots of figure drawing and practical theory) and Circle Line Art School (lots of perspective stuff, some videos with step by step instructions). The main thing is just to practice, also look at others drawings etc and see if you can identify stuff like the vanishing points in their work, after a while you can spot where people have made errors in perspective and how they cover stuff like that up.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIglV0xXAIs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EPNYWeEf1U

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



MTV Crib Death posted:



Sorry for the double post but I wanted to ask a question. Does anyone have any resource recommendations for accurate portrait drawing? My people are starting to look like actual people instead of deformed monsters but they're rarely recognizable as the reference models I use. I don't know the first thing about measuring and spot checking and the like.

This was drawn from a photo of Sara Bareilles btw.

If you have a photo manip program take your image and place it over the top of the reference. Without changing the width:height ratio, line up your drawing over the ref, then make your drawing or the reference image (whichever is on top) transparent until you can see how the features you've drawn line up with the models face.

To me, it looks like you've drawn with a very soft pencil. This gives the whole face a loose texture, and kind of flattens things out by reducing contrast. Because you can see a lot of the paper through the shaded areas, the hair and the sides of the face have very similar tone and the shading goes in the same direction and this makes it look like they are on the same plane of depth.

Compare to Radios images below, where the edge of the form is very dark and the paper actually does most of the 'shading', while some light bits of pencil help to point out the contours and shapes. It's a different kind of style which relies less on shading and more on contours - what little shading there is only goes in a few directions. The curves in the body come across more sharp and geometric but are balanced out because they are shaded so lightly compared to the outer edge.

Radio du Cambodge posted:

Here are sketches from a recent life drawing session:
'



I got these off google because they show the construction of depth in the face by using different types of pencil, shading strength, and direction. By starting off by very lightly constructing the shapes in the face you can stand back and see if everything is sitting nicely in proportion before you add lots of depth.




You can find a lot of tips just by looking at 'how to draw anatomy/faces' books - some of the general tips I recall are that attractive faces tend to have the pupils in line vertically with the outer points of the lips, and you can draw a straight, slightly diagonal line from the middle of the ear to the edge of the eye. Another tip for improving drawing is that if you always draw a face in the same 'order' you might try something different. Some people like to make an outline of the head before adding features, so if that's you then try doing it another way and start with the lips or eyes or even the nose, and this can let you work on keeping all of these elements in proportion without relying on the 'boundary' of the head. I know in the past I've done a head outline which is not quite right, then ended up trying to squash the features inside, or make them stretch to fit - even though the face is technically 'in proportion' it doesn't actually resemble the model.

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



Al! posted:

this started out as something very, very different and took a dark turn



I find it interesting how you consider it a dark turn, you always bring out this relaxing aspect of nature, like sitting by a pond at night but its a cyber-pond.

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



Kind of long-faced but probably the best reference drawing I've done in some time. Got lazy with the hair.


TheMostFrench fucked around with this message at May 1, 2018 around 13:10

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



Discussion wise, I've been doing a live drawing class where the lecturer tells us not to leave out the head or face because it's a form of identity erasure (we've also been discussing the history of nudes and how classical nudes were oppressive to women), and will mark you down if you just submit body sections. Has anyone else ever encountered this? What do you think? It seems like the intention is to train us to consider the meaning behind every mark we make, or to try and rise above historical ideals.

TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



smallmouth posted:

Farting around with some different things.



This is pretty cool, is that gauze or something for the surface?

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TheMostFrench
Jul 12, 2009

Stop for me, it's the claw!



SexyBlindfold posted:

It helped that the markers were ridiculously cheap (a no-brand 6 marker pack bought for like 5 bucks at a local arts and crafts shop), so I could just go to town with them, instead of getting all stingy and careful like when I bring Copics.

I love these cheap packs but I find the colours are always limited to primary black, primary colours, and fluro greens, pinks and yellows. Looks like you've found some nice warm shades.

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