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Koalas March
May 21, 2007



Black people (specially in the US) have a unique history with art. As slaves were not allowed to create, yet we did. The majority of our creative output has been appropriated and repackaged for white audiences (Jazz, Rock and Roll, Hip Hop). It's only been recently where we are finally allowed to be seen as fragile, gentle, and soft. There is a new movement (which you can see in Wiley's art) which seeks to appropriate traditionally "white" art styles and include black people, especially in photography.



If you try hard, you can find black folks in traditional art, such as Simon Willem Maris, Portrait of a Young Black Woman, Netherlands , 1890s.



Feel free to post your favorite pieces, talk about art history, whatever.

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Orange Devil
Sep 30, 2010

Waar is da feestje?

HIER IS DA FEESTJE!



I really like the first painting, who is the artist?

Also, I can never get enough of Rembrandt: https://www.mauritshuis.nl/en/explo.../two-moors-685/

Darth Walrus
Feb 13, 2012
:gas;


Guess I should link back to that effortpost I did back in the old Negrotown thread about the Civil Rights Era art exhibition in the Tate Modern.

Sleepy Sheep
Jun 12, 2009


I looked up Kehinde Wiley after the presidential portrait was unveiled, and his pieces are quite powerful.



pokchu
Aug 22, 2007
D:

This was my post in TRUMP THREAD, re: Kehinde Wiley.

quote:

Kehinde Wiley is phenomenal, and I highly recommend this coffee-table book, whose namesake exhibition I was able to see in person last year.

And he doesn't just do painting! He also dabbles in other mediums, like this guy:


(Houdon Paul-Louis, 2011)

And even stained glass:

(Saint Remi, 2014)

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts here in Richmond, VA has also done a very good job in expanding their collection of African, African American and African Diaspora pieces, not just in traditional canvas-based formats, but in fashion design, furniture, and others.

Additional KW content: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUfZ_Y-qwhY
Here he is discussing his most recent touring exhibition during it's opening at VMFA.

Beastie
Nov 3, 2006

They used to call me tricky-kid, I lived the life they wish they did.

I'm a white dude that never had the opportunity to take an African American Studies class in college. I'm really looking forward to reading this thread. I don't have anything to add, but I'm hoping to learn.

Thanks!

Edit: grammar

Beastie fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2018 around 19:36

biracial bear for uncut
Jun 9, 2009

Lets make a Panda!


It's been linked to in various threads in TGRS at one time or another, but http://medievalpoc.tumblr.com/ should probably also be in the OP for discussion purposes.

Also The FAQ for people that don't use Tumblr much.

After The War
Apr 12, 2005

to all of my Architects
let me be traitor


When I saw your post in the Trump Thread, KM, I thought "I hope she does it" and here we are!

How much do we want to expand this into the Arts in general? There's so much history of music and literature I'd love to go into, but they could easily get their own threads.

Not American, but because I'm currently reading Count of Monte Cristo and we still have to occasionally acknowledge that poc did exist in 19th-century Europe:





(Okay, I really just wanted to share that picture. There are actual photos of him later in life, but look at that! Just look at it!)

Koalas March
May 21, 2007



After The War posted:

When I saw your post in the Trump Thread, KM, I thought "I hope she does it" and here we are!

How much do we want to expand this into the Arts in general? There's so much history of music and literature I'd love to go into, but they could easily get their own threads.

All art is welcome here. That includes music, sculptures, prose, etc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7ZzfjRzZuk

I actually wrote a script based on this song that I am about to pitch.

Tenik
Jun 23, 2010



I have to second the recommendation for medievalpoc's tumblr. It's great seeing portraits showing how people dressed, and just how much diversity there was in certain parts of medieval society.




PT6A
Jan 5, 2006



This is a very cool thread, thank you for taking the time to make it, KM!

RBA-Wintrow
Nov 4, 2009


Koalas March, I'm dissapointed in you. You were inspired to make this thread, and then you didn't post the inspiration!

https://twitter.com/amyklobuchar/st...081056667734016

Some people have said the wall of green distracts from the president and just adds noise. But look at those eyes! his expression makes the rest of the painting fall to the background. Here is a man not afraid of confrontation! This is the Barack Obama from the campaign. Hope we can believe in!

If only Dutch politicians had a fraction of that passion and intensity. My country is boring.
We used to have good artists though:

Adding:


Rembrandt van Rijn, Two Moors, 1661

Orange Devil linked to it in the 2nd post.


Edit:



I dunno, It's a good painting, but it doesn't speak to me. It feels very flat. Michelle has a very expressive face. It show strenght and stability. Even more so than her husband she radiates dignity and compassion.

Her official portait shows little of that. Its just a lady in a dress.

RBA-Wintrow fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2018 around 20:47

Koalas March
May 21, 2007



Watching kids ATM but disappointed that you posted Barack and not Michelle!

sean10mm
Jun 29, 2005

Dispensing unwanted fitness advice since 2005. P.S. Squat more! BEEFCAKE!!!

After The War posted:

When I saw your post in the Trump Thread, KM, I thought "I hope she does it" and here we are!

How much do we want to expand this into the Arts in general? There's so much history of music and literature I'd love to go into, but they could easily get their own threads.

Not American, but because I'm currently reading Count of Monte Cristo and we still have to occasionally acknowledge that poc did exist in 19th-century Europe:





(Okay, I really just wanted to share that picture. There are actual photos of him later in life, but look at that! Just look at it!)

Alexandre Dumas's father, Division General Thomas-Alexandre Dumas:

Only registered members can see post attachments!

sean10mm fucked around with this message at Feb 12, 2018 around 21:40

Koalas March
May 21, 2007



Rudy Kadett
Oct 22, 2007

I don't think I like you much.





This is a monument to Leopold II, king of Belgium (1885-1909), in the port city of Ostend. Typical colonial art, made in 1931 by Alfred and Antoine Courtens in bronze. The king transformed Ostend into a world-famous belle époque seaside town - urban projects mainly financed with the wealth Leopold II amassed in his colonial empire in Congo Free State, at the time his personal property. The group on the left represents the "grateful" people of the Congo, liberated from the Arabian slavers. In 2004 an anarchist group sawed off the hand of the Congolese man on the left, as a protest. It has not been found ever since.

The city has added a new sign next to the monument, explaining (albeit meekly) the context of the piece.

Inepta Lacerta
Nov 20, 2012

.
Really quite silly indeed.


This is a rad thread and I hope people keep posting in it. Here's my contribution, a portrait of Gustav Badin (Adolf Ludvig Gustav Fredrik Albert Badin), a colored man living in Sweden at the end of the 18th century and beginning of the 19th, raised at the royal court and who lived to the ripe old age of 75.


(Portrait painted by Gustaf Lundberg, 1775)

His history can be found here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustav_Badin and pictures a life that must've been fairly non-standard for someone born a slave at that point in time, much due to the then queen of Swedens fascination with the philosophies of Rosseau (ideas like "the noble Savage" which were of course still virulently rascist, but perhaps enlightened for the time). I personally don't know of too many documented colored people in the history of Sweden who actually lived here, so it's interesting both from the historical standpoint as well as a more sociological one.

Inepta Lacerta fucked around with this message at Feb 13, 2018 around 08:14

BluesShaman
Apr 25, 2016

She wore Blue Velvet.


White people make art like this. And black people make art like this.

Keep on perpetuating the idea black and white people are inherently different!

(USER WAS PUT ON PROBATION FOR THIS POST)

Megillah Gorilla
Sep 22, 2003

One Potato to rule them all,
One Potato to find them,
One Potato to bring them all
And in the darkness bind them.




Bread Liar

Excuse me, the White Fragility thread is that way.

Ikari Worrier
Jul 23, 2004



Soiled Meat

BluesShaman posted:

White people make art like this. And black people make art like this.

Keep on perpetuating the idea black and white people are inherently different!

It's not impossible to believe that people from different cultural backgrounds would produce differing works of art since art in and of itself is both informed by and a reflection of the culture in which an individual is raised but I know you probably don't give a gently caress and just want to poo poo and run so

After The War
Apr 12, 2005

to all of my Architects
let me be traitor


BluesShaman posted:

White people make art like this. And black people make art like this.

Why yes, there is a long history of monied interests stealing and re-purposing art from Black creators for a "general" (white) audience. Thanks for bringing that up!

I wish I had time to do an effortpost about rock'n'roll (and the rebellion it presented against segregation before The Whitewashing), but don't know how much loving off I can do at work besides posting 19th century dreamboats.

Orange Devil
Sep 30, 2010

Waar is da feestje?

HIER IS DA FEESTJE!



The humming section of this song and specifically this recording of it is the most calming thing I've ever heard: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kQlRQRGdfQ

Crain
Jun 27, 2007



I'm glad this thread popped up, I just went to the SAAM on Saturday. Kinda mad that I spent my time there on Saturday instead of Monday but that's what I get for not paying attention.

The one thing that caught my eye was an exhibit on Kara Walker's series "Harper's Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated)". The art in the series is comprised of exaggerated caricatures of black people as they were portrayed in the past (so exaggerations of exaggerations) overlaid on old Harper's Weekly illustrations from the civil war era that ignored the existence of black people as victims of oppression and of the war, much less their suffering. I'm not gonna bother with any lovely cell phone pics since The Smithsonian has much better pictures available here: https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/walker.

However I did take a pic of the caption they had about the series which is pretty relevant to the infinite horde of sealions who try to ignore the history behind racial stereotypes (And maybe you should take a few notes too BluesShaman):



If you can't read/load the pic:

"Kara Walker's work exposes a dark period of oppression and racism in America's past. Throughout the nineteenth century, particularly during and after the Civil War, African Americans were portrayed with vicious and dehumanizing caricatures. Used as propaganda, the depictions sought to demonize black people to justify slavery and later to legitimize Jim Crow laws that enforced segregation. Walker revisits these images in her work, often exaggerating the racial caricatures and emphasizing the violence perpetrated against them in order to confront the the fictions that gave rise to stereotypes. Her work has spawned controversy because it does not explicitly denounce or undercut these distorted views. Instead Walker challenges viewers to confront the discomfort these misrepresentations provoke and the unconscious prejudices they unmask, prodding us to consider how racist imagery of the past shapes attitudes in the present."

xthetenth
Dec 30, 2012

Mario wasn't sure if this Jeb guy was a good influence on Yoshi.



BluesShaman posted:

White people make art like this. And black people make art like this.

Keep on perpetuating the idea black and white people are inherently different!

You're absolutely right that art is a product of intrinsic differences and not cultural legacies



such as the injustices of (for example) the American caste system where a different perspective drastically changes the experiences being expressed.

It'd be super humiliating if you'd said this in a situation where there was and is an entirely different vocabulary with different implications for the use and portrayal of different people's bodies



wouldn't it?

Outside of the snark, the first one was one of the two pieces that really hit me (the other was just snarky, a marble statue of a bunch of styrofoam takeout containers. Amusing but not really relevant) when I saw it in a museum recently.

Hank Willis Thomas has made some good stuff, a lot of it focusing on the implicit portrayals in advertising, and some just using the visual language.

https://hankwillisthomas.com/

Koalas March
May 21, 2007



I love this thread.

quote:

British Hair Awards: Afro Finalist Collection by Luke Nugent

When it comes to hairdressing, Lisa Farrall is one of the best in her field. Her collection, Armour, won first place in 3 categories at The Black Hair Awards and was also one of the finalists in the prestigious British Hair Awards 2016.

Armour (makeup by Suhyun Kang-Emeryshot + shot by Luke Nugent) is a tribute to African culture. It represents beauty and strength, which is usually difficult to capture.





Tenik
Jun 23, 2010



Holy poo poo that hair is amazing. I had to look up the photographer for those shots, and I found an album with more entries from Armour:
https://www.behance.net/gallery/451...list-Collection

Samovar
Jun 4, 2011

me irl


That's simply incredible.

Flipswitch
Mar 30, 2010

HA! HA! HA!


Those are legit amazing. Shared those between my group immediately.

Aves Maria!
Jul 26, 2008

Maybe I'll drown


This is beyond amazing. The talent required to pull something off like that... yeesh

Koalas March
May 21, 2007



Can anyone identify this for me?

I've always thought it was dope.

Aves Maria!
Jul 26, 2008

Maybe I'll drown

Koalas March posted:

Can anyone identify this for me?

I've always thought it was dope.



That's a banksy, from the bristol art museum

Inepta Lacerta
Nov 20, 2012

.
Really quite silly indeed.


Koalas March posted:

I love this thread.




I love all of these, but this one in particular is just fantastic. Almost looks like something out of some computer RPG (and in that case, clearly someone you don't want to mess with).

CroatianAlzheimers
Jun 15, 2009

I can't remember why I'm mad at you...


Inepta Lacerta posted:

I love all of these, but this one in particular is just fantastic. Almost looks like something out of some computer RPG (and in that case, clearly someone you don't want to mess with).

I thought the same thing. I saw her and was like, "Man, I hope she's on our side".

I don't know where this came from or who shot it, but I love the lighting.

1994 Toyota Celica
Sep 11, 2008

Z E A L!







this is Sumō yūrakuzu byōbu, painted in ~1605 by an anonymous Japanese artist. that's supposedly Oda Nobunaga on the right, one of the great warlords of late 16th century Japan, he was way into sumo wrestling

the man on the left is not definitely identified, but there's a relatively short list of prominent Africans in the Oda court. his name in Japanese was Yasuke, and since his original name is not definitely known that's what i'll call him by in this post. he was a samurai, during the golden age of Japanese samurai



this painting does not depict Yasuke, but it does depict his condition when he arrived in Japan, as a slave of Jesuit missionaries. Nobunaga did a lot of business with the Jesuits, who were also getting active in China around this time, because he could buy Portuguese muskets through them, and because he viewed Christianity as a useful counterweight to the militant Amida ("Pure Land") Buddhism espoused by warrior monks whose monastic orders were among Nobunaga's most persistent opponents.

the Jesuit missionaries brought with them slaves obtained through the Portuguese merchant forts off the East and West coasts of Africa. there's several theories on where exactly in Africa Yasuke came from, placing his origin anywhere from Mozambique to Ethiopia. Almost all of what we know of his life comes from either contemporary Japanese sources, and contemporary Japanese writers only had a hazy, third-hand understanding of African geopolitics as relayed by the Jesuits, or the Jesuits themselves, written well after the fact, so his precise origins will probably never be definitely proven. his life in Japan, however, is well-attested to.

Yasuke met Oda Nobunaga in his capacity as a Jesuit slave in March 1581. He'd already made a bit of a stir in town after he arrived with his Italian master, being one of the few African men most 16th Century Japanese people were ever likely to see. Japanese sources say he was a tall, good-looking man and immensely strong, all of which favorably impressed Nobunaga--according to a samurai in the service of Tokugawa Ieyasu, who met Yasuke, he was something like 6'2" in a time when the average height in both Japan and Europe was around 5' even. It's unclear whether the Jesuits gave Yasuke to the daimyo as a gift, or whether Nobunaga extended the offer to take Yasuke off their hands; the Japanese sources suggest the former without stating it outright, the Jesuit sources make no comment either way. Whichever, when Nobunaga returned to his fortress-headquarters at Azuchi, Yasuke went with him.

The second he exchanged masters, Yasuke's position shot up in the world. The Japanese did not practice slavery in the European fashion, and Nobunaga seems to have treated Yasuke like any other of his retainers--that is, like any other of the warlike fellows he kept on hand as bodyguards and advisors. According to Japanese sources Yasuke received a residence from his new daimyo and a ceremonial katana. The latter especially was a huge gesture to someone not born into the Japanese feudal aristocracy, even moreso than the house, and wearing it in public would've marked Yasuke as a bushi, a member of the Japanese warrior class, which in combination with his service as a retainer to Nobunaga made him, for all intents and purposes, a samurai: a bushi warrior sworn to the service of a particular feudal lord and his household. Yasuke served as Nobunaga's weapon-bearer in military and ceremonial occasions until the latter's death by suicide. He continued serving Nobunaga's son Nobutada, but when Nobutada's last fortress fell to the army of Akechi Mitsuhide he was taken captive. Rather than executing him or forcing him to commit ritual suicide, the Akechi returned Yasuke to the Jesuits, and nothing further is known of his biography. There is an account of an African gunner serving in the army of Arima Harunobu in 1584 , a samurai lord who converted to Christianity known to have met both Yasuke and his original Italian master, but since there were other African people in Feudal Japan serving the Japanese, Jesuits, and just independently seeking their fortunes, that's not definite proof of anything. One hopes he behaved as a samurai if the Jesuits tried to re-enslave him and cut off the offenders' heads for their impertinence.



Yasuke has since become a figure of Japanese popular culture, especially in media that focuses on the life of Oda Nobunaga. The above is art from his portrayal in the PS4 game Nioh, which I know nothing about other than he's a major character in it. There is apparently also a Yasuke biopic in the works from Lionsgate Films, which I personally look forward to.



this is one of four sculptures of Yasuke by South African artist Nicola Roos.

Inepta Lacerta
Nov 20, 2012

.
Really quite silly indeed.


zeal posted:



<A great post>

I love these kinds of posts, seeing documentation and glimpses into the lives of people in history traditionally less spoken about is great. (also, gently caress european slave culture both then and now, it's like a spectre that refuses to die, masked though it may be these days).

As for Nioh, it is cool and good, and if you like games in the style of Dark Souls it should be up your ally, being quite similar but with a decidedly more japanese mythos bent to it. Also available for Windows.

Here's a trailer. Haven't gotten far enough myself to run into Yasuke yet though: https://youtu.be/tCYrMmeYY6M

Darth Walrus
Feb 13, 2012
:gas;


Yasuke is only a minor character in Nioh (he’s a boss battle in one late-game mission), but he’s a cool and memorable one who’s treated with respect. There’s a certain subtext of someone who already did the protagonist William’s ‘exotic foreign badass’ schtick on hard-mode.

In fact, Nioh’s politics are kind of interesting (if somewhat off-topic) - from a western perspective, it looks very much like a white-saviour narrative, but it’s a joint production driven by the Japanese side, and Japan doesn’t really have quite the same ‘oppressed, colonised nation’ internal narrative as other countries (which created some interesting disconnects in perception of the recent Ghost in the Shell movie - Japanese-Americans saw the whitewashing of the cast as a manifestation of the racism they constantly dealt with in America, while Japanese critics were more ‘oh, huh, neat, a big-budget Hollywood version of one of our stories’). As a result, it reads more like one of those ‘immigrant makes good, achieves incredible status’ stories, if you catch my drift.

Koalas March
May 21, 2007



I'm excited for a Yasuke film but Lions gate wouldn't be my first choice lol.



Pop Art of Ariana Miyamoto the first half black woman to become Miss Universe Japan.

Does anyone have a lead one some good black modern or pop art?

Panfilo
Aug 27, 2011

EXISTENCE IS PAIN

I wonder what kind of meltdowns racist weeaboos would have that one of nobunaga's retainers was a black man.

Inepta Lacerta
Nov 20, 2012

.
Really quite silly indeed.


Panfilo posted:

I wonder what kind of meltdowns racist weeaboos would have that one of nobunaga's retainers was a black man.

That was an amusing thought to start the day with, thanks!

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KiteAuraan
Aug 5, 2014

I AM ANGRIER THAN EVER!

The fact is would surprise them at all tells to how little they know about Japanese history. Oda Nobunaga was a pretty forward thinking and open to the outside world guy for the Sengoku Period, that's part of why he got so villainized in later Japanese popular imagery.

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