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Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006

that avatar was in poor taste, and you'll probably change this one anyway, but let's contribute a bit to lowtax's health insurance at least have something better for a small while

- scrooge mcduck


We all have them. The guns that we love despite knowing that there are other things that do what they do better. That one design that you just can't help but be enamored with despite how derpy it is. I'm not talking about grandpa's old squirrel gun that you could never sell - "sentimental guns" was last month - but the objectively inferior design that you just can't help but love. The wonky 80s action hero "assault" pistol, the early autoloading rifle that was obsolete before WW2 started, the mad meth-fuled fever dreams of designers with more ambition than skill, the insane special snowflakes that exist just to be different from the AR-15.

Let's see where your blind spots are and what bad guns you just can't help but love. The derpy engineering abortions that make you sadly shake your head, know you're kind of an idiot, and mutter "I just can't quit you."

Make a post, make a thread, just make a little effort and talk to us about why it has such a hold on you.

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Shima Honnou
Dec 1, 2010

The Once And Future King Of Detroit





College Slice

Oh poo poo, garbage month, my month.


Armscor M206. Almost as good as a Detective Special, if it had wiggly lockup and weren't very good. I've had this gun punch out primers and become jammed up, I've had the hammer seize up on me leading to me having to baby it for like 10 minutes because I don't want to ND. And yet I still like it because gently caress off it's my revolver. Early on in owning this thing I bought a nickel trigger but the electroplating made it impossible to fit a pin into the trigger. So I started grinding in that pinhole. Unfortunately I'm a measure never cut five times kinda guy so that ended up being slightly too big which meant the gun stopped working in double-action and had super-sloppy single-action verging on unsafe. Which is why the blued trigger is what's in there right now.


Yugo M57, the longtok. Tokarevs are already cool and good as they are 1911s but from bizarro world where they cost $200 instead of $2000 and have tiny ultrasonic armor-piercing bullets instead of giant fat trucknuts for bullets. Getting these things into the country has led to a whole diaspora of safety mechanisms. Mine is a baby safety that you have to dig in with your nails to activate even though it looks like it could be done with a thumb the truth is no you cannot activate that with a thumb you'll cut yourself on the sharp pot metal edges. Ironically all these old Tokarevs already come with a safety since they have half-cock which locks the gun up. As you can see, they don't stamp the ZASTAVA, YUGOSLAVIA mark deep enough to take a color fill which sucks. The main bad thing about Yugo Toks is since they are hi-cap compared to normal Tokarevs they can't take a normal Tokarev grip so finding custom grips that both fit and are cool is almost impossible for me. Interestingly, modern M57s are pretty much 100% cross-compatable so if you own both a C&R and a modern you could just mix-and-match parts all day long who gives a poo poo. Best feature: captured slide spring, eat that poo poo because it ain't going flying nowhere.


The P-64, Poland's totally original do-not-steal design. With a 25lb factory trigger it's a nightmare hellzone for shooting double-action. For real if you even consider getting one of these you need to install a lighter mainspring immediately. Surprisingly smooth and nice in double-action though, even with the factory trigger, and with a lighter trigger I'd estimate it's close to 2-3lbs of pull force DA, maybe even less. You may also notice I put in a bigger heel release when I did that because gently caress it you gotta take the release off anyway to change the spring. Shoots pretty well, surprisingly accurate for its size and what it is. It has neat safety features including a round-in-chamber indicator, a decocker for if you hate yourself, some kinda half-safe that I've never been able to figure out if it's a feature or just a mistake in the design, and like the Makarov it has that thing where the hammer rests slightly off the firing pin and you can't force it forward to do a pinstrike without having the trigger completely held. My biggest issue with it is that it holds as much as a revolver, but it's extremely compact and would probably be prime carry material if you wanted to carry a steel gun. Despite being steel it's pretty light and small, I shove it in my pocket when I'm outside in the yard a lot. The A stands for "actually, this is not a clone." I don't know what the :| face stands for.

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



I will make you regret this.

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006

that avatar was in poor taste, and you'll probably change this one anyway, but let's contribute a bit to lowtax's health insurance at least have something better for a small while

- scrooge mcduck


Butch Cassidy posted:

I will make you regret this.

Yeah I was thinking of you when i wrote all that. Youíre our lovely gun Cupid

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



I'm as hard-headed as the ZAMAK-3 that surrounds me.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Butch Cassidy posted:

I will make you regret this.

I'll let you go first. I need to gather my thoughts.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004



Fun Shoe

Seems like a good excuse to share with you the most dangerous antique in my house.

This is an Iver Johnson Safety Automatic, Second Model. It's a .32 cal top break black powder revolver from ~1900. It also no longer holds cylinder lock, and the trigger pull can best be described as 'painful'. Apocryphally it belonged to my great-great-grand-uncle, who carried it as a police officer in the early 1900's, and the last person known to have fired it was my grandfather, who died in the 1950's. Dad never bothered to fix it, as it was too dangerous to shoot a top-break revolver that might explode from smokeless powder pressures, and I'll never do it either.



The cool thing about these guns is how ahead of their time they are. They're a shrouded hammer DA revolver that uses a transfer bar and trigger lever safety, and have an actual automatic ejector built in when you break the action. One of the same model was used to assassinate President William McKinley, which I didn't know until I went looking for the actual production dates on these.




That said, due to the tiny handle and hideous trigger pull, it would be a bastard to shoot.

MazeOfTzeentch
May 2, 2009

rip miso beno


For what it's worth, those Iver Johnsons do not lock the cylinder from rotation when at rest at all, by design. Try puling the trigger with an unloaded gun, and hold the trigger back. at that point the cylinder should have indexed itself and locked up. Try to rotate it then. If it doesn't lock up, then there's definitely something mechanically wrong.

There is a company out there that sells BP loaded .32 S&W Short, which is what those chamber, it's like $60 $41 a box though.
https://www.buffaloarms.com/32-s-w-...of-50-amo32swsb

My dad's got one that belonged to his uncle, I wanna get a box at some point and give it a go. .32 S&W Short is a very tame cartridge, similar in energy to .22 LR.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004



Fun Shoe

Yeah, it doesn't lock at all, no matter the trigger positiin.

SpartanIvy
May 18, 2007

this avatar is brought to you by the campaign to pay lowtax's medical bills since 1999
Keep the lights on in this dead gay forum


Fun Shoe

This fucker right here. The Sterling 302

Technically my moms gun but I'll get it eventually, I'm sure.

It's a simple 22 LR blowback striker fired pistol design. Basically a Saturday night special if someone were to actually put some decent work into them. They're made of stainless steel, and I don't think they were especially cheap at the time. Despite it's higher quality appearance and construction, it's still a piece of poo poo. Just less so than others.

It jams a lot, but works fairly well with minimags. One time it somehow unwound and fed the firing pin spring through the firing pin hole while firing and jammed the firing pin in the forward position. Somehow it did not go full auto and instead just decided to jam.

Despite these flaws it's still a neat little gun and a hoot to shoot. Also surprisingly accurate. It has a fixed barrel and some decent rifling on it. I once shot the wings off a butterfly that landed on my target at 10 yards with it.




Runner up is this Noble 33A I used to own. It was the second gun I ever bought I think, and it was such a cool design in concept.


Pump action 22 that can fire S/L/LR and you can mount a weaver rail to it? Sign me the gently caress up! The downside being that it fed SO unreliably it was ridiculous. Every bullet would require a good ten seconds of loving with the pump, or sticking a knife into the action to pry something around. There's no knowledge base around them and spare parts are basically unobtainium so I traded it+cash for a High Standard HD Military. After finding videos of it working correctly on youtube it still looks fun as hell.

SpartanIvy fucked around with this message at Feb 17, 2018 around 17:50

Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Heh, yeah, 'round here I call myself The Enabler. I suspect pretty much everyone wishes they could be me -- I'm kind of a big deal, you see.




The ergos are atrocious, to look at. The problem with this gun is that I bought it for next to nothing and the drat thing is a laser gun, for everyone who shoots it. Why? Damned if I know. You would think it would be the worst gun ever and it's not.

I can't figure out where my other pictures of it are. I do have pictures of a better gun for this thread however:










As to what they did to it I think they put some serrations in the backstrap, the barrel looks to be a replacement with the text in totally the wrong place. The front sight is, well I think you can see for yourself what it is. of course its also been fitzed. There's a hole in the butt which I think maybe was for some home brew lanyard ring, but it's not present. The frame has been ground on for some purpose.

Pretty sure it started life as a pocket positive from 1920. No idea when it was improved.

I'm ashamed to admit it, but I really like how the removed trigger guard feels in the hand. I can see how dudes back in the day would get addicted to having a gun like this.

The front sight is pretty Cyrano's Dad-ish.




Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Heh, yeah, 'round here I call myself The Enabler. I suspect pretty much everyone wishes they could be me -- I'm kind of a big deal, you see.


Before you ask: no I have no documentation on whether or not this gun has been used in murders.

Yes, it came out of Florida.

So have any wise-guys been whacked with this thing?



edit: one other thing.

When I won this on gunbroker I threw a 75 dollar bid on it, and forgot I had done so. I didn't think I would ever get any functional revolver for that. A month later I was looking at gunbroker and it said I had won something. I was a bit confused because I had no idea what I had won.

Ended up calling the florida pawn shop and apologizing. They said they still had it, I could still pay..so I did!

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006

that avatar was in poor taste, and you'll probably change this one anyway, but let's contribute a bit to lowtax's health insurance at least have something better for a small while

- scrooge mcduck


That front sight almost looks like they threaded it on over the muzzle. those flats look like the would fit a wrench perfectly. Maybe someone figured that would be easier than trying to install the sight on the barrel normally?

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Cyrano4747 posted:

That front sight almost looks like they threaded it on over the muzzle. those flats look like the would fit a wrench perfectly. Maybe someone figured that would be easier than trying to install the sight on the barrel normally?

I do believe you're correct. But hey, it's easy to adjust for windage!

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Double post for the first one that came to mind for me:

Beretta 96D Brigadier. These were standard issue for INS and Border Patrol from 1994 to around 2003, when they started issuing the USP Compact LEM in .40. The gun was admired for its long sight radius, which made for more accurate long-distance shooting as was sometimes encountered in the desert of the southwest. The DAO trigger made for a relatively easy transition from the revolvers that had been issued up to that point.

However the gun was bulky and heavy, given that it only had an 11-round magazine. And it was a true DAO, which had upsides and downsides. Mechanically it was simple and reliable for a semi-auto, but due to the length of the pull it's not a gun you could shoot quickly, despite the advent of the "D" spring which cut the DA pull weight by about half, from 15 pounds to around 8. But because of the fire control's simplicity, the trigger was very smooth if nothing else.

I had fired the guns in training a little early in my career but didn't really think much about them. I like Berettas in general; they feel good to me and point pretty naturally. I like the heavy duty Brigadier slide, which allows you to swap out the front sight if you want (not an option on regular 92- and 96-series slides). But beyond that I didn't think much about the 96D, good or bad.

Until I went to firearms instructor/armorer school.

I got to shoot the 96D more extensively along side our two other commonly-issued handguns at the time - the Glock 17 (with 8-pound trigger) and the USPc .40 with heavy LEM. I had carried the Glock for years at that point so I was pretty good with it. I liked the design of the LEM on the USPc, but it was a nightmare to work on from a gunsmithing standpoint. The 96D on the other hand... Yeah, you couldn't shoot it as quickly as the other two guns, but for me it was laser accurate. We shot our advanced bullseye course with all three guns, and I got a 300/300 with the Beretta, the only time I've done that in my twenty-year career before or since, with any handgun. There's something about a smooth DAO trigger that really makes accurate shooting easy for me.

And I fell in love with it from a mechanical standpoint during armorer training. The design is elegant and simple, both overall and specifically the DAO fire control group.

In this agency, there isn't a lot of love for the "Italian Tomahwak", but it holds a special place in my heart. I do carry and compete with mine from time to time, though I mostly run lighter guns like Glocks or HKs now.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Heh, yeah, 'round here I call myself The Enabler. I suspect pretty much everyone wishes they could be me -- I'm kind of a big deal, you see.


Cyrano4747 posted:

That front sight almost looks like they threaded it on over the muzzle. those flats look like the would fit a wrench perfectly. Maybe someone figured that would be easier than trying to install the sight on the barrel normally?

Basically it's a nut that the guy milled a sight into then threaded the end of the barrel so he could screw the nut with his sight on there.

Or possibly put it on the barrel and then milled the sight onto it.

Whatever it's deal is I think he started with a big nut and turned it into the thing that is the sight.

The funny thing is that all the work on the gun (save one thing) was done extremely well. That one thing is that someone put the extractor star back in wrong (it only has one way it can go in), so that it is offset just enough on every chamber that you can't actually load it. I've had it soaking in kroil for a year but I haven't been able to get it to unscrew so I can take it out and put it back in right. yet.

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006

that avatar was in poor taste, and you'll probably change this one anyway, but let's contribute a bit to lowtax's health insurance at least have something better for a small while

- scrooge mcduck


Sixgun Strumpet posted:

Basically it's a nut that the guy milled a sight into then threaded the end of the barrel so he could screw the nut with his sight on there.

Or possibly put it on the barrel and then milled the sight onto it.

Whatever it's deal is I think he started with a big nut and turned it into the thing that is the sight.

The funny thing is that all the work on the gun (save one thing) was done extremely well. That one thing is that someone put the extractor star back in wrong (it only has one way it can go in), so that it is offset just enough on every chamber that you can't actually load it. I've had it soaking in kroil for a year but I haven't been able to get it to unscrew so I can take it out and put it back in right. yet.

Doesn't surprise me that the work was done well. Everything about it screams that someone made it who was a good machinist but not necessarily a gun smith. The no fucks given to what way the writing on the barrel points, for example, and I can totally see some engineer or machinist in the 40s coming up with that threaded nut idea when faced with "so, I just cut off my front sight, how do I put on a new one?"

Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Heh, yeah, 'round here I call myself The Enabler. I suspect pretty much everyone wishes they could be me -- I'm kind of a big deal, you see.


Cyrano4747 posted:

Doesn't surprise me that the work was done well. Everything about it screams that someone made it who was a good machinist but not necessarily a gun smith. The no fucks given to what way the writing on the barrel points, for example, and I can totally see some engineer or machinist in the 40s coming up with that threaded nut idea when faced with "so, I just cut off my front sight, how do I put on a new one?"

Yeah, that's been my impression, which I rather like. Especially for a gun that cost me next to nothing.

I'd have to say that guns like this make me a lot happier then they really have a right to.

I have another gun that's very similar in terms of skill applied to it. I wouldn't say it's a bad gun, and it probably doesn't belong in this thread (unless you want to talk about .38 S&W aka .38/200 British and it's hilarious shortcomings).









So this little thing appears to be a situation where someone liked features on other guns, but didn't like aspects of them.

Clearly a Detective Special was available at the time of this gun's upgrade, but I'd wager the person who commissioned this, or the gunsmith who did this for themselves, didn't like grip, or maybe the size of the gun (being longer and wider then the Police positive)



So they took a Police Positive:



And stuck a Detective Special barrel on it, to give you a better, shorter, barrel and a nice modern ramp sight.

Then they cut off the grip bottom, braized some metal back in there, and shaped it to fit a Pocket Postive grip shape, so they could put pocket positive grips on there:



You might ask why he didn't just re-barrel a pocket positive? I think the answer would be that they only made them in 32.

In the end you have a hell of a nice little gun, and the colt collectors turn their nose up at it because it's all wrong.

Honestly, it 100% filled my need for a detective special. I like it way better then actual detective specials, and it was a lot cheaper.

Sten Freak
Sep 10, 2008

Despite all of these shortcomings, the Sten still has a long track record of shooting people right in the face.


That is cool. By the way, Iíve seen a couple detective special barrels on PP frames on GB in the last few months so maybe it was a thing. The grip mod is fairly radical.

Hereís one with an ambitious price.

https://www.gunbroker.com/item/748214265

Other one I saw went for 325 or so. I like the patina on yours though.

Comfy sponk
Mar 30, 2007



SpartanIV posted:

This fucker right here. The Sterling 302

Technically my moms gun but I'll get it eventually, I'm sure.

It's a simple 22 LR blowback striker fired pistol design. Basically a Saturday night special if someone were to actually put some decent work into them. They're made of stainless steel, and I don't think they were especially cheap at the time. Despite it's higher quality appearance and construction, it's still a piece of poo poo. Just less so than others.

It jams a lot, but works fairly well with minimags. One time it somehow unwound and fed the firing pin spring through the firing pin hole while firing and jammed the firing pin in the forward position. Somehow it did not go full auto and instead just decided to jam.

Despite these flaws it's still a neat little gun and a hoot to shoot. Also surprisingly accurate. It has a fixed barrel and some decent rifling on it. I once shot the wings off a butterfly that landed on my target at 10 yards with it.





Holy poo poo. I thought I was the only poor sod who has one of these things. Although, mine is in .25 ACP and is in desperate need of new grips. For a while there, it was my most expensive pistol to shoot at ~$25/50.

SpartanIvy
May 18, 2007

this avatar is brought to you by the campaign to pay lowtax's medical bills since 1999
Keep the lights on in this dead gay forum


Fun Shoe

Comfy sponk posted:

Holy poo poo. I thought I was the only poor sod who has one of these things. Although, mine is in .25 ACP and is in desperate need of new grips. For a while there, it was my most expensive pistol to shoot at ~$25/50.

They are crazy uncommon. I've seen maybe two others at gun shows over the years. I once came across a magazine for one at a gun guys table at a flea market and he had it marked for $50. I told him I'd give him a dollar for it and he hit me back with "No way it's worth much more than that!". I countered that if he could tell me what gun it was for I'd give him his asking price. I ended up leaving with it for $5.

I forgot the mention the amazing sights it has. Which I can only describe as Smith and Wesson hog wallow sights scaled for a hamsters eyeballs.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Here's another one of mine. I don't know what my fascination is with fixed-carry-handle ARs. Maybe it's sort of the KISS side of me having an affinity for robust fixed sights that can't be knocked off the gun. Maybe it's the fact that my first "official" firearm qualification was as an Air Force cadet, and I shot expert with an M-16 (not even an A1). Or maybe it's that I like optics on rifles, but only when they're mounted way forward in a scout-type position or, in the case of an AR, in a gooseneck mount. I like the functionality of a forward optic and I like the balance of the rifle with an optic farther forward. I also have a fondness for 14.5" fixed carry handle rifles from when I qualified on Air Force GUU-5/Ps early in my current career, and from later in my career the only M4s we had were flat-tops but only came with detachable carry handles and no optics.

And so it happened that someone was selling police trade-in A2 Bushmasters last year for under $500, and I knew I had to have one. Normally I'd stay away from Bushmasters, but a police trade-in gun is likely to have had all the kinds worked out, while being given a nice bit of honest finish wear and having a butter-smooth action through regular training use. And they looked to be proper "mil-spec" rifles with 14.5-inch barrels with the addition of a permanent YHM muzzle device.

I got one and fell in love with it as soon as I opened the box. First thing I did was throw an old Aimpoint M68 on a gooseneck mount and installed it. I actually ran it at a 3-gun match like that and was reasonably happy with how it felt.





But I was never a real fan of the skinny handguards, and the bigger M4 style handguards interfered with the gooseneck mount. What to do? I tried the Magpul MOE-SL handguard, and it fit like a glove - both the gun, and me. It's not vintage, and it's not true to any of the other guns I've qualified on, but I really love it. The gun has run like a top, it's accurate, and it's reliable. I used it for a one-day carbine class and it kept trucking while my buddies' Troy and Noveske rifles were choking on the range sand.

So yeah, I bought a Bushmaster. A used one. With a fixed carry handle. And it's my favorite AR.

infrared35 fucked around with this message at Feb 22, 2018 around 04:13

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



Hot.

Proper Kerni ng
Nov 14, 2011



infrared35 posted:

So yeah, I bought a Bushmaster. A used one. With a fixed carry handle. And it's my favorite AR.

I'm surprised you were USAF, because that is goarmy as gently caress.

There really is a special sense of THIS IS MAH RAHFLE with a dorky AR, isn't there; that thing looks like tons of goofy-rear end fun.

Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006

that avatar was in poor taste, and you'll probably change this one anyway, but let's contribute a bit to lowtax's health insurance at least have something better for a small while

- scrooge mcduck


Proper Kerni ng posted:

I'm surprised you were USAF, because that is goarmy as gently caress.

There really is a special sense of THIS IS MAH RAHFLE with a dorky AR, isn't there; that thing looks like tons of goofy-rear end fun.

They're just so goddamned easy to modify and build up from scratch that they practically beg to be customized. If anything bugs you about your rifle chances are there is a thing you can buy to fix it.

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Proper Kerni ng posted:

I'm surprised you were USAF, because that is goarmy as gently caress.

There really is a special sense of THIS IS MAH RAHFLE with a dorky AR, isn't there; that thing looks like tons of goofy-rear end fun.

I was never in the real Air Force, but that's the closest I have to military experience. And then, later, in my current career, the USAF hooked me up with patrol rifle instructor school and M-16 armorer school where we used 20" A2s and GUU-5/Ps, much like the Bushmaster I have now.

I love a fixed carry handle rifle, and I love an Aimpoint in a gooseneck mount. There, I said it again!

infrared35 fucked around with this message at Feb 24, 2018 around 14:19

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



You still need a C-More in a gooseneck on something. Like a sims gun!

infrared35
Jan 12, 2005

border patrol qt


Butch Cassidy posted:

You still need a C-More in a gooseneck on something. Like a sims gun!

I had a C-More (though it was the polymer one and not the metal one), and it didnít survive being bashed up against a shipping container.

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



Fair enough. Sideways C-More on a Sig Nightmare in 357 Sig.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004



Fun Shoe

Might as well just mount it to a Hi-Point carbine with deck screws.

Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Heh, yeah, 'round here I call myself The Enabler. I suspect pretty much everyone wishes they could be me -- I'm kind of a big deal, you see.


Liquid Communism posted:

Might as well just mount it to a Hi-Point carbine with deck screws.

Pfft.

Jeremy_X
Jul 27, 2006


Liquid Communism posted:

Might as well just mount it to a Hi-Point carbine with deck screws.




Both wrong.



This is how you attach anything to a Hi-Point

Sixgun Strumpet
Feb 16, 2009

Heh, yeah, 'round here I call myself The Enabler. I suspect pretty much everyone wishes they could be me -- I'm kind of a big deal, you see.


Jeremy_X posted:

Both wrong.



This is how you attach anything to a Hi-Point

It's a hi point, you will just destroy it with that thing.

Jeremy_X
Jul 27, 2006


Sixgun Strumpet posted:

It's a hi point, you will just destroy it with that thing.

Kind of the point......

Butch Cassidy
Jul 28, 2010



Cyrano4747
Sep 25, 2006

that avatar was in poor taste, and you'll probably change this one anyway, but let's contribute a bit to lowtax's health insurance at least have something better for a small while

- scrooge mcduck



I'd be nervous taking that much metal off the slide with one of those things. Given that it's just a giant blowback I'd be worried it wouldn't slow down extraction enough and you'd be pulling brass under too much pressure.

Comfy sponk
Mar 30, 2007



SpartanIV posted:

They are crazy uncommon. I've seen maybe two others at gun shows over the years. I once came across a magazine for one at a gun guys table at a flea market and he had it marked for $50. I told him I'd give him a dollar for it and he hit me back with "No way it's worth much more than that!". I countered that if he could tell me what gun it was for I'd give him his asking price. I ended up leaving with it for $5.

I forgot the mention the amazing sights it has. Which I can only describe as Smith and Wesson hog wallow sights scaled for a hamsters eyeballs.

I'm taking mine out soon. I'll see if I can get a good enough shot of the sights.

DeesGrandpa
Oct 21, 2009

Probably like King Nazi




It's a stupid posurp heavy barreled dissy AR15 with the surefire handguard. Everything about it is done wrong just as an era of things done right/ok enough came about.

It just shoots so drat well. Today I was thinking of selling it to fund a new Dan Wesson A2, as it is a stupid pointless gun when I've got other ARs, but I couldn't hit submit.

Fearless
Sep 3, 2003

DRINK MORE MOXIE


This hateful bitch, right here:



I did a longer writeup on this thing a few months ago, but it's still a gun that I love dearly in spite of its capricious, frustrating and cantankerous nature. It's a Mk II** Snider Enfield dated to 1864 and for the past year and a half I have been doing my level best to get it shooting accurately (well, as accurately as a transitional cartridge rifle is going to get). I've learned a lot from it and it has fought me every step of the way but I think that is a big part of the charm-- when that Eureka! moment arrives, I really feel like I have earned it. Oh, and some super obscure markings on this rifle helped me and a few other Victorian firearms enthusiasts aid in identifying a crate of extremely rare 1853 Enfields and got us cited in a provincial archaeology report. There are genuinely moments where this thing makes me want to yank out my beard in frustration, but not a single other firearm that I own has held my interest so completely for so long.

Here's the original thread, which has more info on reloading for it and history and poo poo:

https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...hreadid=3836911

Fearless fucked around with this message at Feb 26, 2018 around 08:44

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MazeOfTzeentch
May 2, 2009

rip miso beno


Fearless posted:

This hateful bitch, right here:



I did a longer writeup on this thing a few months ago, but it's still a gun that I love dearly in spite of its capricious, frustrating and cantankerous nature. It's a Mk II** Snider Enfield dated to 1864 and for the past year and a half I have been doing my level best to get it shooting accurately (well, as accurately as a transitional cartridge rifle is going to get). I've learned a lot from it and it has fought me every step of the way but I think that is a big part of the charm-- when that Eureka! moment arrives, I really feel like I have earned it. Oh, and some super obscure markings on this rifle helped me and a few other Victorian firearms enthusiasts aid in identifying a crate of extremely rare 1853 Enfields and got us cited in a provincial archaeology report. There are genuinely moments where this thing makes me want to yank out my beard in frustration, but not a single other firearm that I own has held my interest so completely for so long.

Here's the original thread, which has more info on reloading for it and history and poo poo:

https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...hreadid=3836911

Can't wait to get one of the nepalese untouched ones

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