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Lawman 0
Aug 17, 2010



Grimey Drawer

Also what is rue?

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SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



I've been enjoying this thread since it was started, and I always like experimenting with new flavors. I'll take you up on that rue, if you don't mind.

my cat is norris
Mar 11, 2010

#onecallcat



College Slice

Lawman 0 posted:

Also what is rue?

It's an evergreen with a pretty strong flavor, iirc. I've never eaten it but have been curious.

GreyjoyBastard
Mar 28, 2010

I've made a huge mistake.

It's bitter but in a... nice way?

It's been a long time since I had it but my brain associates it very loosely with cilantro?

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

I PMed ya both; I've used the herb fresh but not dried, so this will be a neat experiment for the thread, haha!

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Oscar Wilde Bunch posted:

My favorite of his are all the "this is technically food, it has calories and if you eat it you won't die of starvation" videos.

It also made me realize how hard it is to find suet that isn't meant for birds.

I just bought 3 kilos of suet, as in the real kidney fat stuff, 5.50 euros a kilo. Took them some asking around but they found a source. I am fortunate to have a good butchers shop out here in the sticks. I still need to wait until June before I can pick it up though.

Didn't they used to fry french fries in this stuff in McD up until the 80s? Or was that just ordinary beef fat? Either way it's something I wanna try. I am also thinking suet might be good for frying donuts and other things.

Randaconda
Jul 3, 2014

sprinkles

His Divine Shadow posted:

I just bought 3 kilos of suet, as in the real kidney fat stuff, 5.50 euros a kilo. Took them some asking around but they found a source. I am fortunate to have a good butchers shop out here in the sticks. I still need to wait until June before I can pick it up though.

Didn't they used to fry french fries in this stuff in McD up until the 80s? Or was that just ordinary beef fat? Either way it's something I wanna try. I am also thinking suet might be good for frying donuts and other things.

They used beef tallow at McDonald's, and it owned.

Helith
Nov 5, 2009

Basket of Adorables



College Slice

His Divine Shadow posted:

I just bought 3 kilos of suet, as in the real kidney fat stuff, 5.50 euros a kilo. Took them some asking around but they found a source. I am fortunate to have a good butchers shop out here in the sticks. I still need to wait until June before I can pick it up though.

Didn't they used to fry french fries in this stuff in McD up until the 80s? Or was that just ordinary beef fat? Either way it's something I wanna try. I am also thinking suet might be good for frying donuts and other things.

A whole world of British Suet Puddings awaits you!

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Randaconda posted:

They used beef tallow at McDonald's, and it owned.

What's the difference between suet and tallow? It's kinda confusing, some sources I've read say beef tallow is suet that's been rendered. Which is what I was planning todo with it so it'll have a long shelf life.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004



Fun Shoe

His Divine Shadow posted:

What's the difference between suet and tallow? It's kinda confusing, some sources I've read say beef tallow is suet that's been rendered. Which is what I was planning todo with it so it'll have a long shelf life.

Suet is specifically fat from around the loins and kidneys of sheep or cows, while tallow is rendered fat in general. Tallow is shelf stable, suet requires refrigeration long-term.

By popular demand
Jul 17, 2007

IT *BZZT* WASP ME--
IT WASP ME ALL *BZZT* ALONG!


Suet is very good for oven roasted vegetables for stock.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Liquid Communism posted:

Suet is specifically fat from around the loins and kidneys of sheep or cows, while tallow is rendered fat in general. Tallow is shelf stable, suet requires refrigeration long-term.

Does rendered suet have a particular name to distinguish it?

darthbob88
Oct 13, 2011

YOSPOS


His Divine Shadow posted:

Does rendered suet have a particular name to distinguish it?
Considering this is described as tallow rendered from suet, I would assume not.

feedmegin
Jul 30, 2008




Liquid Communism posted:

suet requires refrigeration long-term.

No? Not in the UK anyway -

https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-...ducts/265612930

Good for dumplings in stew.

Jo Joestar
Oct 24, 2013


Jas Townsend has a video on preparing beef suet.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004



Fun Shoe

darthbob88 posted:

Considering this is described as tallow rendered from suet, I would assume not.

Not that I'm aware of, anyway, because it doesn't really have any distinctive properties from other tallow once rendered.

EdBlackadder
Apr 8, 2009


Lipstick Apathy

The widely available suet here in the UK is shredded, dehydrated and mixed with flour, shelf stable and easy to weigh.

ekuNNN
Nov 27, 2004



This historian I know has a cool cooking channel making old Dutch Golden Age recipes from the 1700's.
The first episode is about pies:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdyhRGwHN4Y

C.M. Kruger
Oct 28, 2013


For the thread's consideration, a "relief soup" from the Irish potato famine:

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

To Soyer's credit, his soup was pretty standard fare for invalids at the time. The big deal was that he was the first guy to really set up a "soup kitchen" operation for those in need.

Arquinsiel
Jun 1, 2006

"There is no such thing as society. There are individual men and women, and there are families. And no government can do anything except through people, and people must look to themselves first."

God Bless Margaret Thatcher
God Bless England
RIP My Iron Lady


On the other hand, the population still hasn't reached pre-famine levels so...

JacquelineDempsey
Aug 6, 2008

It's a horrible name for anything really but especially a shirt.


A quarter pound of meat in two gallons of water? Mm mm! Reminds me of one of my favorite Peanuts strips:

https://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/2013/04/03

Out of curiosity, what book is that from? As someone whose job every Sunday is to make 75 pounds of roasted potatoes, the header "HISTORY AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE OF THE POTATO" is cracking me up right now. Is that the book title, or just the chapter title?

dinahmoe
Sep 13, 2007



JacquelineDempsey posted:

A quarter pound of meat in two gallons of water? Mm mm! Reminds me of one of my favorite Peanuts strips:

https://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/2013/04/03


I knew which one this was before I even clicked on it. My all time favorite.

Gnoman
Feb 11, 2014


JacquelineDempsey posted:

A quarter pound of meat in two gallons of water? Mm mm! Reminds me of one of my favorite Peanuts strips:

https://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/2013/04/03

Out of curiosity, what book is that from? As someone whose job every Sunday is to make 75 pounds of roasted potatoes, the header "HISTORY AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE OF THE POTATO" is cracking me up right now. Is that the book title, or just the chapter title?

Well, there is a book by that title.

C.M. Kruger
Oct 28, 2013


JacquelineDempsey posted:

A quarter pound of meat in two gallons of water? Mm mm! Reminds me of one of my favorite Peanuts strips:

https://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/2013/04/03

Out of curiosity, what book is that from? As someone whose job every Sunday is to make 75 pounds of roasted potatoes, the header "HISTORY AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE OF THE POTATO" is cracking me up right now. Is that the book title, or just the chapter title?

The book title, author is Redcliffe N. Salaman. I read the entire thing a couple years ago over the summer, IIRC the first chapters are somewhat dry because they mainly cover taxonomic stuff and archeological stuff in South America, but the rest of it is a history of how potatoes arrived in Europe and spread throughout the English Isles, and how Ireland ended up with a monoculture crop and so on. Somewhat dated (originally published in 1949, which is the copy my local library had) and it seemed like the rest of Europe was barely mentioned, but I found it interesting and I certainly learned a lot about potatoes.

Zopotantor
Feb 24, 2013


C.M. Kruger posted:

Somewhat dated (originally published in 1949, which is the copy my local library had) and it seemed like the rest of Europe was barely mentioned, but I found it interesting and I certainly learned a lot about potatoes.
Page 3 is a bit too early to ask for a new thread title, but...

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004



Fun Shoe

Speaking of historical cookery, I'm doing a take on something waaaay back today. There isn't much existing documentation as far as recipes go from Anglo-Saxon culture, but I got this recipe as a likely thing from some folks I know in the SCA, based on a recipe pulled from The British Museum Cookbook.

Here's the original:

quote:

Hare, Rabbit, Veal or Chicken Stew with Herbs & Barley
Serves 6

In 7th century England, herbs were one of the few flavourings available
to cooks and were used heavily...

50g (2oz) butter
1 -1.5kg (2-3 lb) (depending on the amount of bone) of hare or rabbit
joints, stewing veal or chicken joints
450g (1lb) washed and trimmed leeks, thickly sliced
4 cloves garlic, chopped finely
175 g (6 oz) pot barley
900 mL (30 fl oz, 3 3/4 cups) water
3 generous tablespoons red or white wine vinegar
2 bay leaves, salt, pepper
15 fresh, roughly chopped sage leaves, or 1 tablespoon dried sage

Melt the butter in a heavy pan and fry the meat with the leeks and
garlic till the vegetables are slightly softened and the meat lightly
browned. Add the barley, water, vinegar, bay leaves and seasoning. bring
the pot to the boil, cover it and simmer gently for 1 - 1 1/2 hours or
till the meat is really tender and ready to fall from the bone. Add the
sage and continue to cook for several minutes. Adjust the seasoning to
taste and serve in bowls-- the barley will serve as a vegetable.

And here's my take on it:

Ingredients:
3 good sized leeks, cleaned and chopped
1/2lb of bacon
2 cups cracked wheat berries
2-3 cloves of garlic
Half an onion
Salt, cracked pepper, bay leaf, thyme, and rosemary
4 cups vegetable broth
4 cups water
2 Tbsp of good vinegar

I'm making a briw, which as you might guess is the word for soups, broths, and stews. In this case, I'm going for something closer to pottage. It's a fair recreationist assumption that given that flour is a huge pain in the rear end to grind from hard wheat by hand, yet it was still a popular foodstuff, that it was probably cooked closer to whole grain as well as being made into leavened and unleavened breads. Leeks and garlic were popular staples in this period, and sound good to me, so in they go. Same with an onion. Bay Laurel was known to Britain thanks to the Romans, so I'm not going to feel bad about that going in either. The broth was something I needed to use up too.

Standard soup method. Chop the bacon, put it on lowish heat to render a little fat, then toss the aliums in to release a little flavor. Add liquids, add wheat, bring to a boil. Reduce to simmer, add spices and herbs. Simmer about an hour until everything is tender and the wheat is done.

It's on the stove now, so I'll add more pictures later, but it looks promising and my house smells great.


chitoryu12
Apr 23, 2014

We can't stop here! This is cat country!

Old medieval food always smells awesome because of the sheer amount of flavors you've got going on, but it's a toss-up how it'll end up tasting.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004



Fun Shoe

Survey says: pretty good. Needed a little more umami so I hit the bowl I was eating with a shot of worchestershire sauce because I was otherwise out of anchovies.

Zombie Dachshund
Feb 25, 2016



Update on lucanica salami: it's done! (actually, it was done earlier in the summer, but I was too lazy to post)



Good flavor, glad I upped the % of fish sauce in the recipe. A little bit of funk, and I just love the cumin.

Next time I'll make two changes: first, go all the way and make it with 100% colatura di alici, and second, smoke it a little more. It could stand 2-3 overnight cold smoking sessions. In the meantime, it's a nice addition to a charcuterie plate.

chitoryu12
Apr 23, 2014

We can't stop here! This is cat country!

Zombie Dachshund posted:

Update on lucanica salami: it's done! (actually, it was done earlier in the summer, but I was too lazy to post)



Good flavor, glad I upped the % of fish sauce in the recipe. A little bit of funk, and I just love the cumin.

Next time I'll make two changes: first, go all the way and make it with 100% colatura di alici, and second, smoke it a little more. It could stand 2-3 overnight cold smoking sessions. In the meantime, it's a nice addition to a charcuterie plate.

Wish I could get a slice of that! I love charcuterie boards.

my cat is norris
Mar 11, 2010

#onecallcat



College Slice

I received my goon gift of both fresh and dried rue! Any recipes you'd recommend for its use?

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

I'd love to know about your curing chamber! Salami making sounds waaaay my speed.

JacquelineDempsey
Aug 6, 2008

It's a horrible name for anything really but especially a shirt.


I just stumbled upon an interesting bit of culinary history I thought y'all might like!

I have a thing for cicadas: I think they're pretty, I actually love the din they make, and find it so weird that some species live for 13 or 17 years underground just to emerge, mate, and die in a matter of a week or so. The annual cicadas are starting to sing in my part of Virginia, and it occurred to me to check out this excellent website to see if we had a 13 or 17 year brood coming.

No joy for me, but this year heralds the return of the Onondaga Brood, in my hometown of Syracuse NY. It's the smallest brood, and most likely to go extinct. Some clicking around led me to discover the historic meat (ha!) of this post. I'll try to keep this succinct, but I find it fascinating as hell.

So what is now Onondaga County/Syracuse NY was and is the capital of the Iroquois Confederacy --- who now prefer to be called the Haudenosaunee, which I respect but am going to abbreviate as H'nee bc drat that is a handful to type. The H'nee sided with and aided both the colonists and British during the French and Indian War, but when the Revolution started, they decided that was a war between "father and son" and peaced out, becoming neutral. Can't blame 'em.

Well, Geo Washington doesn't like this, and gets pissy enough about it to order General Sullivan to literally scorch the earth.

the guy on our dollar bill posted:

The Expedition you are appointed to command is to be directed against the hostile tribes of the Six Nations of Indians, with their associates and adherents. The immediate objects are the total destruction and devastation of their settlements, and the capture of as many prisoners of every age and sex as possible. It will be essential to ruin their crops now in the ground and prevent their planting more. I would recommend, that some post in the center of the Indian Country, should be occupied with all expedition, with sufficient quantity of provisions whence parties should be detached to lay waste all the settlements around, with instructions to do it in the most effectual manner, that the country may not be merely overrun, but destroyed.

Sullivan takes his troops to Onondaga Lake (which I grew up 2 blocks from), and starts burning everything in a ten mile radius. Longhouses, villages, orchards, all the planted crops... everything. Many of the Onondaga tribe flee, but anyone left was killed (not even taken prisoner as per GW's orders). They warn the rest of the H'nee of the danger, and wander around for a typically horrible upstate NY winter starving and trying to get by.

They return to Onondaga the next spring, and try to settle again. With no food stores, all their crops demolished, and wildlife to hunt scarce thanks to forests being burned, they are seriously hurting, but doing their damndest to return to and rebuild on their their homeland.

And then a miracle happens. That late spring/early summer, The Creator provided them with manna not from heaven, but from the earth: cicadas. What's now known as Brood VII, or the Onondaga Brood, appeared just when the tribes needed a magical food source, and the cicadas provided it. Plentiful protein that tastes like popcorn, bacon, or crab, depending on who you ask? Hey, I'd be down.

The Onondaga to this day celebrate the return of Brood VII, and pass on the story to the kids who've never seen a 17 year cicada. And also have kick-rear end feasts of cicadas. So I thought that was an interesting historic food story, especially since I grew up right there and that's a story you never heard in history class (at least in the 80's). Maybe because the H'nee have since referred to every US President as Hanadagá•yas, or "Town Destroyer".

I've heard cicadas are genuinely Good Eats, but never tried one. Really tempted to get in on it when the next brood comes to my area (2020). Anyone ever had one?

edit: here are some of my source links, if y'all want to read more in depth.

http://www.cicadamania.com/

http://www.onondaganation.org/blog/...rge-washington/

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/22/...aga-nation.html

JacquelineDempsey fucked around with this message at Jul 30, 2018 around 23:33

my cat is norris
Mar 11, 2010

#onecallcat



College Slice

That's really cool. Thank you for sharing!

Tunicate
May 15, 2012




The problem with eating things like cicadas and scorpions is that there's a surprisingly high chance that you're highly allergic to them.

chitoryu12
Apr 23, 2014

We can't stop here! This is cat country!

Tunicate posted:

The problem with eating things like cicadas and scorpions is that there's a surprisingly high chance that you're highly allergic to them.

Finally, something I might be allergic too!

I think my daring food habits might be due to having an iron stomach and no known food allergies.

Leraika
Jun 14, 2015

slime time


Fun Shoe

I've eaten cicada before (stir-fried and in salsa) before but I can't really remember anything of the taste over my stomach going YOU'RE EATING A BUG!!!!!!!!. They mostly just had crunch, anyway.

Maybe next time they swarm here I'll try cooking some.

RoboRodent
Sep 19, 2012

Please get me out of this snake.


I've been fascinated by cicadas since I first learned of them, but I've never seen one. Good to know that at least one person who lives with cicadas thinks they're neat.

My experience with bugs as food is that they're crunchy but without a lot of flavour themselves. I've had crickets that were toasted as a snack food, but they don't taste of much other than the flavoured powder on them and the legs and antennae are a bit off-putting. Mealworms are meant to be better? I know my sister was going to make a stir fry using pet store mealworms but I never heard how that turned out.

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POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Drone honeybee larvae are fat and sweet. Ants have a citrusy taste. Boiled silkworms are musty.

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