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Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


War. War never changes.



Fun Shoe

If you want some good entertainment and insight on 18th century (and a few earlier recipes) cooking, check out JAS Townsend & Son's Youtube channel. They're a reproduction wares house for historical recreators, but have a huge passion for how poo poo was actually done, and do a ton of very educational content on old recipes. Their mushroom ketchup recipe is a favorite of mine, although I don't make it often.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29u_FejNuks

In additional notes, the SCA folks do a lot of work on recreating medieval recipes for modern use. I've made a few from Cariadoc's Miscellany that turned out pretty okay.

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Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


War. War never changes.



Fun Shoe

willing to settle posted:

It was a common thing in wealthy medieval European kitchens because of the dual factors of keeping a whole lot better than cow's milk and being lenten and generally appropriate for fast days.

EDIT: I made a mawmeny ages ago and it is indeed pretty good, though it's pretty similar to a lot of the other meals in the medieval European genre of "thick stews with pumpkin pie spice".

One thing I've learned from historical recipes is that 'nutmeg' is a verb, and they will use it liberally.

chitoryu12 posted:

Iíll post the recipe in a bit, but the pinch suggested didnít add really anything to the flavor or color.

It came out very sweet, in fact. All of the other spices are equaled by the amount of sugar.

Did you use unsweetened almond milk? The historical version was likely just pressed almonds, as sugar was somewhat expensive on its own.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


War. War never changes.



Fun Shoe

His Divine Shadow posted:

What's the difference between suet and tallow? It's kinda confusing, some sources I've read say beef tallow is suet that's been rendered. Which is what I was planning todo with it so it'll have a long shelf life.

Suet is specifically fat from around the loins and kidneys of sheep or cows, while tallow is rendered fat in general. Tallow is shelf stable, suet requires refrigeration long-term.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


War. War never changes.



Fun Shoe

darthbob88 posted:

Considering this is described as tallow rendered from suet, I would assume not.

Not that I'm aware of, anyway, because it doesn't really have any distinctive properties from other tallow once rendered.

Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


War. War never changes.



Fun Shoe

Speaking of historical cookery, I'm doing a take on something waaaay back today. There isn't much existing documentation as far as recipes go from Anglo-Saxon culture, but I got this recipe as a likely thing from some folks I know in the SCA, based on a recipe pulled from The British Museum Cookbook.

Here's the original:

quote:

Hare, Rabbit, Veal or Chicken Stew with Herbs & Barley
Serves 6

In 7th century England, herbs were one of the few flavourings available
to cooks and were used heavily...

50g (2oz) butter
1 -1.5kg (2-3 lb) (depending on the amount of bone) of hare or rabbit
joints, stewing veal or chicken joints
450g (1lb) washed and trimmed leeks, thickly sliced
4 cloves garlic, chopped finely
175 g (6 oz) pot barley
900 mL (30 fl oz, 3 3/4 cups) water
3 generous tablespoons red or white wine vinegar
2 bay leaves, salt, pepper
15 fresh, roughly chopped sage leaves, or 1 tablespoon dried sage

Melt the butter in a heavy pan and fry the meat with the leeks and
garlic till the vegetables are slightly softened and the meat lightly
browned. Add the barley, water, vinegar, bay leaves and seasoning. bring
the pot to the boil, cover it and simmer gently for 1 - 1 1/2 hours or
till the meat is really tender and ready to fall from the bone. Add the
sage and continue to cook for several minutes. Adjust the seasoning to
taste and serve in bowls-- the barley will serve as a vegetable.

And here's my take on it:

Ingredients:
3 good sized leeks, cleaned and chopped
1/2lb of bacon
2 cups cracked wheat berries
2-3 cloves of garlic
Half an onion
Salt, cracked pepper, bay leaf, thyme, and rosemary
4 cups vegetable broth
4 cups water
2 Tbsp of good vinegar

I'm making a briw, which as you might guess is the word for soups, broths, and stews. In this case, I'm going for something closer to pottage. It's a fair recreationist assumption that given that flour is a huge pain in the rear end to grind from hard wheat by hand, yet it was still a popular foodstuff, that it was probably cooked closer to whole grain as well as being made into leavened and unleavened breads. Leeks and garlic were popular staples in this period, and sound good to me, so in they go. Same with an onion. Bay Laurel was known to Britain thanks to the Romans, so I'm not going to feel bad about that going in either. The broth was something I needed to use up too.

Standard soup method. Chop the bacon, put it on lowish heat to render a little fat, then toss the aliums in to release a little flavor. Add liquids, add wheat, bring to a boil. Reduce to simmer, add spices and herbs. Simmer about an hour until everything is tender and the wheat is done.

It's on the stove now, so I'll add more pictures later, but it looks promising and my house smells great.


Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


War. War never changes.



Fun Shoe

Survey says: pretty good. Needed a little more umami so I hit the bowl I was eating with a shot of worchestershire sauce because I was otherwise out of anchovies.

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Liquid Communism
Mar 9, 2004


War. War never changes.



Fun Shoe

Given the places they waged war that makes sense. Being stuck on the tundra for months is not unlike being at sea when it comes to vitamins.

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