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Prop Wash
Jun 12, 2010





Cardiovorax posted:

Stinging nettles are perfectly edible once you boil them, which completely denatures the irritant their hairs contain. It's a fairly popular type of herbal tea where I live, you can buy it in most grocery stores.

I made a really good nettle soup last year with nettles we picked from the area. The prep is more hazardous and it doesn't really taste better than comparable greens but it's kind of a fun afternoon activity. Plus I had just been zapped by some while on a trail run the week prior so it was nice and therapeutic.

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the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





elise the great posted:

Speaking of boiling and discarding the water, any of yíall eat amanita muscaria? Itís a constant topic of debate in all my mushie groupsó some folks feel like their ease of positive ID + clear process for safe prep make them an ideal beginnerís pick, while others insist that you can mess up the boiling process too easily.

I live in the PNW so I just havenít bothered to eat anything besides chants, morels, oysters, and shaggy parasols myself

Asserting that a species thatís unsafe until prepped is beginner appropriate is absolute horseshit.

Edit- the simplicity of the prep is kind of irrelevant, youíre also expecting people new to the hobby to never forget thereís one amanita in that basket of chanterelles, and that thereís immediately an exception to Ďnever mix food and dangerous shrooms when picking Ď

the yeti fucked around with this message at 21:03 on Mar 1, 2021

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Also, A. Muscaria contains muscimol which is a deliriant hallucinogen, so please don't suggest newbies treat it as a food. (Doubly so in Louisiana, where it's illegal to do so.)

elise the great
May 1, 2012

BIONIC BUTTSLOUGH


Iím kinda in the middle myselfó amanita is pretty easy to identify in a basket of pretty much anything else, and if you DO eat it without prepping it right, you arenít gonna die or suffer major organ damage, just poo poo a lot and hallucinate. Itís a bad time but a good lesson.

That said, Iíve drifted closer to the opposite school of thought as Iíve seen the dumb fuckin questions people ask in those groups. Endless blurry brown yard mushrooms with the caption ARE THESE MORELS

big scary monsters
Sep 2, 2011

-~Skullwave~-


There are tonnes of A. muscaria around here in the right season but they almost always seem to be horribly worm-eaten. Can't say I've been too tempted to pick them when we have so many nice hedgehog mushrooms, puffballs and porcini around. Shame the chanterelle haul was a bit disappointing last season.

All winter I've been missing the mushrooms and looking forward to spring, but now we've had a big thaw and loads of rain and I miss skiing and wish the snow would come back for another month or two. Bare ground in March just looks weird, and I haven't even spotted any friendly fungi yet.

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





elise the great posted:

That said, Iíve drifted closer to the opposite school of thought as Iíve seen the dumb fuckin questions people ask in those groups. Endless blurry brown yard mushrooms with the caption ARE THESE MORELS

Right thatís tangential to my point, beginners by definition are missing some or all of the mental mapping and vocabulary that makes obvious things obvious to more experienced hobbyistsóand so giving them a Ďif you do this wrong or forget or cross contaminate youíll have an awful time and miss work a day or twoí option is pretty unfair.

Leave that poo poo to idiots like me who want to know if lactofermentation makes local russulas safe

elise the great
May 1, 2012

BIONIC BUTTSLOUGH


Thereís a spot near me with the hugest russula brevipes population Iíve ever seen, I wish I could infect it with lobster somehow. As it is Iím seriously considering eating the fuckers as-is, if I can find some that arenít more worm than mushroom. What kinds of russies yíall grow over there?

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Prop Wash posted:

I made a really good nettle soup last year with nettles we picked from the area. The prep is more hazardous and it doesn't really taste better than comparable greens but it's kind of a fun afternoon activity. Plus I had just been zapped by some while on a trail run the week prior so it was nice and therapeutic.
If you ever want to try again, something helpful to know is you can use it nearly all the same ways you use spinach, except for making salads out it. Well, I wouldn't particularly recommend it, anyway. Pureed, it is a great addition to a potato creme soup.

elise the great posted:

Thereís a spot near me with the hugest russula brevipes population Iíve ever seen, I wish I could infect it with lobster somehow. As it is Iím seriously considering eating the fuckers as-is, if I can find some that arenít more worm than mushroom. What kinds of russies yíall grow over there?
Russula paludosa is very common and tasty here.

silicone thrills
Jan 9, 2008

Enjoy Nature While It Lasts


elise the great posted:

Thereís a spot near me with the hugest russula brevipes population Iíve ever seen, I wish I could infect it with lobster somehow. As it is Iím seriously considering eating the fuckers as-is, if I can find some that arenít more worm than mushroom. What kinds of russies yíall grow over there?

I saw some mushroomers say you can - just bring a lobster you find somewhere else over to that population and shake it/cut the gills, etc over what you want to infect.

Never tried it myself but it makes sense. I wouldnt transport anything too far though.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Seems like a bad habit to get into, artificially spreading edible parasites through a wild population just because you prefer them over the equally edible host.

elise the great
May 1, 2012

BIONIC BUTTSLOUGH


If it helps, lobster is endemic here, I wouldnít be introducing it to a foreign environment. Iíve been watching the spot for a few years in hopes that it will convert, like a couple of other spots Iíve haunted. Probably a terrible idea, but a girl can dream!

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Yeah, but there's still an ecological balance to it. Just a reminder. You probably wouldn't cause an localized extinction of Brevipes shrooms just by spreading the parasite to one more patch, but doing that kind of thing does have consequences.

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





elise the great posted:

What kinds of russies yíall grow over there?

Red ones

In seriousness Iíve found brevipes (quite locally abundant) green quilted (virescens I think, also locally abundant), green ones that Iím reasonably sure are not green quilted, myriad physically distinct red and purple ones that I never managed ID on, and a few brilliant yellow ones that might have been claroflava.

Iím told xerampelina can be found here but I havenít located one yet.

crazyvanman
Dec 31, 2010


Stinging nettles are ridiculously cool and should be eaten all the time, also making nettle cordage is fun. They can also be used to make leafu: http://www.plantfoods.org/demos/leafu/index.html

But since this is the mushroom thread, a muscaria anecdote. It's really common here but I wasn't convinced about eating it (there are definitely better psychoactive mushrooms around). However I heard that shamans in some parts of the world, for example Siberia, have used it by baking in the oven and then squeezing out the juice for tea. I tried this at a really low dose and felt the urge to dance after a while.

Scarodactyl
Oct 22, 2015




Not many shrooms out in NC at the moment but I got a new lens and wanted to try it out. There were still a few bracket mushrooms out with really neat, furry teeth.



The Glumslinger
Sep 24, 2008

Coach Nagy, you want me to throw to WHAT side of the field?




Hair Elf




I see mushrooms like these on fallen trees all over the place here (SF Bay Area), anyone know what kind they are? I assume they're rather poisonous

vonnegutt
Aug 7, 2006
Hobocamp.


The Glumslinger posted:




I see mushrooms like these on fallen trees all over the place here (SF Bay Area), anyone know what kind they are? I assume they're rather poisonous

Most likely turkey tails (Trametes versicolor). There's another similar looking species appropriately called false turkey tails. If the underside has pores, it's turkey tails. They're one of the most hardy fungi I see - they grow throughout the winter even.
They're not poisonous - some people make a tincture out of them to cure various ailments. I can't say how effective it is.

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Wikipedia says that while there is an effective compound to be found in these mushrooms, it can have major side effects, ranging from simple diarrhea to "darkened fingernails," which I am not even sure what could cause that, but it sounds like the reason for it is probably bad.

crazyvanman
Dec 31, 2010


The Glumslinger posted:




I see mushrooms like these on fallen trees all over the place here (SF Bay Area), anyone know what kind they are? I assume they're rather poisonous

Looks like Turkey Tail, but here is the test, source https://www.mushroomexpert.com/trametes_versicolor.html

Totally True Turkey Tail Test

1) Is the pore surface a real pore surface? Like, can you see actual pores?

Yes: Continue.
No: See Stereum ostrea and other crust fungi.
2) Squint real hard. Would you say there are about 1Ė3 pores per millimeter (which would make them fairly easy to see), or about 3Ė8 pores per millimeter (which would make them very tiny)?

3Ė8 per mm: Continue.
1Ė3 per mm: See several other species of Trametes.
3) Is the cap conspicuously fuzzy, velvety, or finely hairy (use a magnifying glass or rub it with your thumb)?

Yes: Continue.
No: See several other species of Trametes.
4) Is the fresh cap whitish to grayish?

Yes: See Trametes hirsuta.
No: Continue.
5) Does the cap lack starkly contrasting color zones (are the zones merely textural, or do they represent subtle shades of the same color)?

Yes: See Trametes pubescens.
No: Continue.
6) Is the fresh mushroom rigid and hard, or thin and flexible?

Rigid and hard: See Trametes ochracea.
Thin and flexible: Totally True Turkey Tail.

poeticoddity
Jan 14, 2007
"How nice - to feel nothing and still get full credit for being alive." - Kurt Vonnegut Jr. - Slaughterhouse Five

Mushrooms in the news:
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-03-australians-wild-mushrooms-deathcap-amanita.amp

Jestery
Aug 2, 2016

D. HALL


Been making a bucket "log" of straw for some oysters

Been heaps of fun and way quicker than I expected

the first week of spawn to bulk


And this morning I birthed it a little early because I was worried about contamination, no massive spots so I'm sure it will be fine

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





Oh nice keep us posted!

Jestery
Aug 2, 2016

D. HALL


Well

Some local fauna decided to "help out" and pecked apart my straw log

No big deal just spread it over the wood chips that were there



Oh well, carrying on

Cardiovorax
Jun 5, 2011

I mean, if you're a successful actress and you go out of the house in a skirt and without underwear, knowing that paparazzi are just waiting for opportunities like this and that it has happened many times before, then there's really nobody you can blame for it but yourself.

Yeah, bad time of year to have a convenient ball of nesting material just sitting in your garden.

Jestery
Aug 2, 2016

D. HALL


Thought I might get Lucky
But this bugger is around

Still, I'm sure something might happen at some point

Fwiw

I have a couple jars of wine caps going well


Lessons learnt from the straw for sure

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Jestery
Aug 2, 2016

D. HALL


Trying to make a passive humidity chamber under the house from some random rear end junk I have lying around



Got a drip going from a resovoir and some holes for air exchange

Hopefully should work, but I might add some more wicking material

Otherwise

My wine caps continue well and I'm pasturising some worm castings and hay to make some cakes tomorrow

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