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Prop Wash
Jun 12, 2010





This year was awful in Central Europe. In addition to everything you mentioned, the elderberry haul was weak and the blackberries barely came in. Even the nettles looked sad.

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Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




extra stout posted:

Been a poo poo season so far and I haven't gotten out as much as I did last year but I wanted to thank everyone who shares pictures, it's a small thread here so I don't want to quote every picture and freeze young people's cell phones but they're great

Unrelated but I don't think we have an active foraging thread: Did anyone else get entirely hosed on nuts? Between last year being what I call a boon year, I don't know if I heard that somewhere or made it up, but a huge nut yield year, and all the floods these last few months the whole area was just hosed. I'm talking dozens of black walnuts in different parks, private property, opposite sides of town putting out like 0-5 nuts. Hickory yield was poo poo. Didn't see a butternut.

Oaks dropped tens of thousands of yellow and black bloated acorns, and early. Squirrels weren't even eating them. Just hoping to find a single hericium and get a doe and I'd be happy at this point.
We had chanterelles here all summer when they're usually just around in June/July.

I mostly just collect stuff to propagate, but last year was a big year here for some stuff. Chinese chestnuts in particular were loaded, but they're pretty reliable, and the Shumart and other red oaks seemed to drop alot, but it was an off year for live oaks and white oaks. This year has been crazy for the live oaks and my yard is basically mulched in acorns. Looks like lots of hickories pretty loaded in the woods. Do you actually eat hickory nuts? I tried one once and it was pretty good, but I think the caloric expenditure to fiddle all the meat out of those stupid nuts would have to outweigh what you'd put into your body. Last big year for beech nuts I remember was 2016 (because I wanted to start some seeds-no luck there), but they don't seem to produce very often. My walnut doesn't seem to be doing much, but its definitely a big year for the pecans. The old-timers always say you get a big pine seed crop after an active hurricane season and we've definitely had a busy one, so we'll see if there's truth in that in the spring.

A Pack of Kobolds
Mar 23, 2007




People's lawns are exploding in the Pacific Northwest right now. This is from an oak-lined street on my walk to work this morning.



extra stout
Feb 24, 2005

ISILDUR's ERR


Kaiser Schnitzel posted:

We had chanterelles here all summer when they're usually just around in June/July.

I mostly just collect stuff to propagate, but last year was a big year here for some stuff. Chinese chestnuts in particular were loaded, but they're pretty reliable, and the Shumart and other red oaks seemed to drop alot, but it was an off year for live oaks and white oaks. This year has been crazy for the live oaks and my yard is basically mulched in acorns. Looks like lots of hickories pretty loaded in the woods. Do you actually eat hickory nuts? I tried one once and it was pretty good, but I think the caloric expenditure to fiddle all the meat out of those stupid nuts would have to outweigh what you'd put into your body. Last big year for beech nuts I remember was 2016 (because I wanted to start some seeds-no luck there), but they don't seem to produce very often. My walnut doesn't seem to be doing much, but its definitely a big year for the pecans. The old-timers always say you get a big pine seed crop after an active hurricane season and we've definitely had a busy one, so we'll see if there's truth in that in the spring.

Hell yeah nut bud, and yes hickory nuts are probably my #1 nut, shagbark hickory, carya ovata I believe, if you can't get the method down quickly I'd honestly just hit them with a palm sized rock and then pick out the 1-2 chunks that aren't mashed and eat them on the spot (or do it for an hour and fill up a jar for cooking), you can also take all the shells that have some hickory nut mashed in them and pile them on a stump as bait for a squirrel hunt, legal in every state that I'm aware of, even the lovely ones that ban deer baiting

A Pack of Kobolds posted:

People's lawns are exploding in the Pacific Northwest right now. This is from an oak-lined street on my walk to work this morning.






Amanita muscaria is entirely unregulated federally and regulated in only a single state, meaning you can dry those caps and sell them over the internet if you feel like it, meaning you could also PM me if you find a few more preferably not so close to the road

extra stout fucked around with this message at 15:30 on Nov 25, 2018

Bi-la kaifa
Feb 4, 2011

Space maggots.



extra stout posted:

Amanita muscaria is entirely unregulated federally and regulated in only a single state, meaning you can dry those caps and sell them over the internet if you feel like it, meaning you could also PM me if you find a few more preferably not so close to the road

Are they worth ingesting? I know very little about the effects of muscimol. I found a large patch of amanita pantherina growing in a park a few weeks ago and I should have thought of collecting them to sell.

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




extra stout posted:

Hell yeah nut bud, and yes hickory nuts are probably my #1 nut, shagbark hickory, carya ovata I believe, if you can't get the method down quickly I'd honestly just hit them with a palm sized rock and then pick out the 1-2 chunks that aren't mashed and eat them on the spot (or do it for an hour and fill up a jar for cooking), you can also take all the shells that have some hickory nut mashed in them and pile them on a stump as bait for a squirrel hunt, legal in every state that I'm aware of, even the lovely ones that ban deer baiting



Amanita muscaria is entirely unregulated federally and regulated in only a single state, meaning you can dry those caps and sell them over the internet if you feel like it, meaning you could also PM me if you find a few more preferably not so close to the road
Iím usually very good at tree identification, but Iíve never been able to sort out the 2-3 species of hickory that grow around here. I think theyíre mostly pignut? One has really big, rounded blunt leaves and the other has pointier leaves, and both have similar bark that looks like darker ash bark.


Are the Amanita worth much? They were all over everywhere in the woods last year-havenít seen as many this year. They look like they get a little funky/rotten when they get big vs. the little button that comes out of the ground. Is one better than the other?

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





Bi-la kaifa posted:

Are they worth ingesting?

Not unless you hate yourself in a very particular way.

Epitope
Nov 27, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Do: enjoy a shamanistic ritual nature has been gifting us for millennia. Decarboxylate first for less discomfort
Don't: commodify the fun guys and let capitalism corrupt this spiritual shard. Also selling drugs on the internet is dodgy regardless of legality. Mailing your internet friends gifts seems more ok, just my opinion.

extra stout
Feb 24, 2005

ISILDUR's ERR


Epitope posted:

Do: enjoy a shamanistic ritual nature has been gifting us for millennia. Decarboxylate first for less discomfort
Don't: commodify the fun guys and let capitalism corrupt this spiritual shard. Also selling drugs on the internet is dodgy regardless of legality. Mailing your internet friends gifts seems more ok, just my opinion.

You're not truly respecting the Siberian elders unless you get a reindeer to eat them first and drink the deer piss from a wooden bucket

Stinky_Pete
Aug 15, 2015

Stinkier than your average bear

Lipstick Apathy

Hi, I saw this in California by either a large oak or pine tree.



Didn't want to try to cut it or mess with it too much in case it was full of eggs, and it was stuck to the stick pretty good—I picked the stick up to put over the rock for better contrast. Seems like the stick wouldn't be enough to support a fruiting body of that size, but maybe it fell off after getting heavy, and this seems like the right place to ask. Is this something that can come out of a twig if a saprophyte (endophyte?) was snaking out through the whole branch?

Fake edit: I looked up the right keywords before posting, and it is probably an "oak gall," which is like a hack that wasps use to get the tree to grow a tumor for its larvae to live in. I figure it fits here because it can catch your eye like a mushroom, and is worthy of caution.

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





Stinky_Pete posted:

Fake edit: I looked up the right keywords before posting, and it is probably an "oak gall," which is like a hack that wasps use to get the tree to grow a tumor for its larvae to live in. I figure it fits here because it can catch your eye like a mushroom, and is worthy of caution.

It actually is worth pointing out! When the empty galls fall into the leaf litter they sure as poo poo look mushroom cap shaped at a distance.

Stinky_Pete
Aug 15, 2015

Stinkier than your average bear

Lipstick Apathy

Went to Natural Bridges park in Santa Cruz, on the Monarch butterfly trail yesterday. No monarchs in sight (cloudy day and too cold for them to fly) but I did catch a few inedible mushrooms!

Full album: https://imgur.com/gallery/HFxQvlW

Either False Chanterelle or Jack o' Lantern ☣️



I'll post spore prints in a follow-up

Ink Caps



Likely clitocybe flaccida


Hygrocybe?



No shortage of hemlock



Miner's Lettuce among the ivy


Bloomin' Ivy (the butterflies drink the nectar)

Stinky_Pete
Aug 15, 2015

Stinkier than your average bear

Lipstick Apathy

Here's the spores

The clitocybe dried up overnight so the spore print is bigger than the cap, lol


Without the cap:


Orange boi


I also took spores of the inkcap but it was like a third of the cap and you can't really see it

Bismuth
Jun 10, 2010

I registered this account 3 years before SU started and 6 years before that character showed up and I could write at least 4 paragraphs about why I hate the show, the creator, the fans, and that specific character


Hell Gem

I know its 2019 now but I found some good shrooms on my parent's apple tree







Sorry the photos aint great, my phone did NOT want to focus on them

Zeluth
May 12, 2001



Neato, all! Well had.

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





Here's some poo poo to start the new year!



Akanthomyces aucleatus, and yes it's an insect pathogen

Siamang
Nov 15, 2003


Morels are just starting to pop here in Tacoma WA. Found about a dozen babies in a city park:

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco






nice! None here yet afaik but it only just started to warm up this week

FreelanceSocialist
Nov 19, 2002


Some random shots from my dog walks. This year has been crazy. Dead/lethargic bees (or just no bees which is kind of unsettling), insane clouds of gnats/mosquitoes, plants flowering unpredictably, and more mushrooms than I can remember seeing in the past. loving climate change. I have no idea what any of these are - just posting them because I think they're beautiful and I figure you mushroom nerds like this stuff. Northeastern US, primarily a stand of white pine with some sugar maple and white birch.

OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN




I think the two red mushrooms are Russula spp., but I wouldn't bet any money on it without being there in person. Russula tend to be brittle and chalky in texture. Many Russula are edible and none are dangerous (outside of Asia) - you can tell the difference between edible and non-edible by a taste test - though I've never eaten any.

I'm not suggesting to eat them, but if you're interested in eating wild mushrooms at some point, this gives you a place to start your research.

Bi-la kaifa
Feb 4, 2011

Space maggots.



I think the greenish one is turkey tail, or some polypore that's closely related to it.

I recently did a hike through the Monashees, and it's been a comparatively wet summer in that neck of the woods. I've never seen such a bounty of mushrooms. Lots of boletus, russulas, coral fungus, and a bunch of other stuff I couldn't identify. I don't normally see any mushrooms until October. I just hope everything keeps fruiting long enough for me to get out and pick some stuff.

OneTwentySix
Nov 5, 2007

fun
FUN
FUN




Bi-la kaifa posted:

I think the greenish one is turkey tail, or some polypore that's closely related to it.

Agreed.

FreelanceSocialist
Nov 19, 2002


edit: ignore - I misread the thing I was looking at

FreelanceSocialist fucked around with this message at 21:48 on Aug 28, 2019

FreelanceSocialist
Nov 19, 2002


Yeah, I know it isn't a mushroom and you'll have to excuse the photo quality but it is pouring rain and getting dark.

So this is monotropa uniflora. I've never seen one in person before. It's a parasitic perennial that doesn't have chlorophyll and so it needs a fungi host which it uses to steal energy from nearby trees. A mycoheterotroph. I looked around a bit but did not see nearby fruiting bodies of the host fungi. The internet says it is probably something in the Russulaceae family.

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





Yup! I donít know how specific they are but I tend to find them in conjunction with russulas

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





Double posting but I finally found a species I'd wanted to check off for a while!

Indigo milk cap:




Also found Dyer's polypore:

Harry Potter on Ice
Nov 4, 2006
Someone on the internet doesn't like me





That indigo milk cap is amazing

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





Harry Potter on Ice posted:

That indigo milk cap is amazing

Right? And those are pretty old dry ones. If you google the fresh young ones are incredibly colored.

Harry Potter on Ice
Nov 4, 2006
Someone on the internet doesn't like me





the yeti posted:

Right? And those are pretty old dry ones. If you google the fresh young ones are incredibly colored.

Whoa! You weren't lying. This is a cool thread I'm excited to learn more about mushrooms

FreelanceSocialist
Nov 19, 2002


Found my first puffball of the season - about 8" in diameter - while I was walking back to my car from the office. Gingerly placed it on the roof while I got my stuff situated. Proceeded to forget about it and drive off. Goddammit. Knowing my luck that will be the only one I come across this year.

pointsofdata
Apr 25, 2011



the yeti posted:

Double posting but I finally found a species I'd wanted to check off for a while!

Indigo milk cap:




Also found Dyer's polypore:


I looked up the indigo milk cap on Wikipedia as
my brother in law gets white mushrooms which bruise very blue regularly in SW France, but that seems to be the only place in Europe where they are found which is weird. Is there some other blue bruising mushroom they could be confused with?

E: it was definitely edible and looked a lot like that, it definitely wasn't a psilocybin

pointsofdata fucked around with this message at 09:58 on Sep 15, 2019

A Pack of Kobolds
Mar 23, 2007




Seen outside Bend, OR, in late August.


Puff balls?

In Seattle, mid-September, growing on an oak



Seen yesterday morning on my neighbor's lawn

Somebody else picked it, but at least it gave a good view of the gills.

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





Those first two are indeed puffballs, but I'm not sure what species you get around there.

The second , that rich mahogany reminds me of Ganoderma species, but I thought they lived on conifers exlusively so I'm not sure what it could be (or else I'm wrong)


If you've had some cool weather where you are it might be time to get out there looking for maitake/hen of the woods! I've found two in the last week or two, and a whole new selection of fall boletes have started coming up.

FreelanceSocialist
Nov 19, 2002


I had hen of the woods a few years ago, sauteed over pasta. Ironically at the restaurant of the same name in Vermont. Both the mushroom and the restaurant were incredible. Would love to find some this fall. I've prepared some store-bought maitake, which I thought was the same, but it wasn't as good. Could've been the fact that I was guessing at the recipe, but the flesh of the maitake just didn't seem quite right. I probably screwed it up, though.

the yeti
Mar 29, 2008

memento disco





The flavors can definitely vary-- I dunno if maitake is farmed on a large scale but who and when the restaurant bought theirs could totally change the flavor compared to the supermarket ones.

FreelanceSocialist
Nov 19, 2002


I believe theirs was foraged - they had morels as part of another dish the first time I went.

Rotten Cookies
Nov 11, 2008

gosh! i like both the islanders and the rangers!!! :^)



We get a huge fruiting of chicken of the woods every year, right at the base of a huge oak tree in front of my house. Well, the tree is gone, but the stump is still there. This year's harvest was truly tremendous. Got 20 lbs of harvest from it this year, with a lot left on the stump. Nearby neighbors also have some fruitings at the base of their trees. The 30 lbs was split with 3 of my friends, and we still have a few pounds in the freezer. It freezes pretty okay. I've been told I'm crazy for not trying to sell this, but

Helps to get at it while it's still kind of pale. The darker the yellow/orange coloring, the tougher the flesh, I've found. My favorite way is to cut them up into nugget sizes pieces, marinate in buffalo sauce for a bit, grill em up til they're crispy around the edges, and dip in the buffalo sauce while poppin' em in.

Edit: Here I am makin' crazy eyes, posing next to it for size reference. This is 2 weeks ago? after a harvest, you can see a section cut away. It goes back to the tree stump you see in the background

Rotten Cookies fucked around with this message at 11:35 on Sep 30, 2019

Bi-la kaifa
Feb 4, 2011

Space maggots.



Tiny boletuses are popping up around my yard. Not sure if they're food worthy.



extra stout
Feb 24, 2005

ISILDUR's ERR


Rotten Cookies posted:

We get a huge fruiting of chicken of the woods every year, right at the base of a huge oak tree in front of my house. Well, the tree is gone, but the stump is still there. This year's harvest was truly tremendous. Got 20 lbs of harvest from it this year, with a lot left on the stump. Nearby neighbors also have some fruitings at the base of their trees. The 30 lbs was split with 3 of my friends, and we still have a few pounds in the freezer. It freezes pretty okay. I've been told I'm crazy for not trying to sell this, but

Helps to get at it while it's still kind of pale. The darker the yellow/orange coloring, the tougher the flesh, I've found. My favorite way is to cut them up into nugget sizes pieces, marinate in buffalo sauce for a bit, grill em up til they're crispy around the edges, and dip in the buffalo sauce while poppin' em in.

Edit: Here I am makin' crazy eyes, posing next to it for size reference. This is 2 weeks ago? after a harvest, you can see a section cut away. It goes back to the tree stump you see in the background



Still haven't tried these as popular as they are, nice looking harvest though. Why the buffalo sauce? Most of the choice mushrooms people just add a bit of fat to and try to let some of the mushroom flavor stick around. Still, it sounds good.

Bi-la kaifa: I'm not sure on the species but at that size it goes without saying I probably wouldn't risk it, still great photographs. Do we have anyone here harvesting nuts this week or last week? I want to make a thread but as usual I'm behind schedule and this subforum seems impossible to revive.

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FreelanceSocialist
Nov 19, 2002


I'm going to be attempting acorn flour to make biscuits, but those are boring nuts.

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