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Molten Llama
Sep 20, 2006


My compressor pulley is apparently sticking and slipping (causing the brand spanking new belt tensioner to dance a tiny carefree jig) only when the clutch is engaged. How boned am I likely to be on a scale from zero to Ron Jeremy's scene partner?

Air output is agreeably frigid and has not changed, nothing is making weird noises. There have been refrigerant and coolant leaks in the recent vehicle history. The coolant sprayed itself across the entire accessory pulley system (water pump gasket was the origin point), while the refrigerant seemingly only oozed out of the hose fitting and coated the top of the compressor in an attractive melange of PAG oil and leak detection dye.

I'm probably going to get away with just a new clutch, right? Right?

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STR
May 12, 2006

I thought I was a nice jester


Molten Llama posted:

I'm probably going to get away with just a new clutch, right? Right?

Make sure no other accessories are sticking - take the belt off, spin everything by hand with the engine off. You'll probably have to start the engine and turn on the ac to get the ac clutch to engage, but do that, then spin the compressor by hand (don't leave the engine running long like this... if your water pump is run off that belt, there's no cooling system - if it's not, there's still no charging system).

If the compressor is binding up, Ron Jeremy. Hopefully it's something else that only starts binding up with the extra drag from the ac.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



There may be some oil on the clutch plates. Try cleaning with brake clearer. Also, look at the manual for your car. The air gap on the clutch may need to be tightened up.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



That's a good point, it could be the clutch itself slipping while it's engaged. Dunno how you'd tell that apart from like an IR camera or something.

GWBBQ
Jan 2, 2005



I have a 2000 Honda Accord, 2.3L engine. Tried recharging it and refrigerant blows out of the suction line where the rubber and metal meet near the compressor. When I replace the line, will I need to add oil or just refrigerant?

DJ Commie
Feb 29, 2004

Stupid drivers always breaking car, Gronk fix car...


IOwnCalculus posted:

Holy gently caress that job sucks. The car ate my one 10mm deep well, too. I think it's behind the blower assembly... which I can't remove without it.

At least it makes cold air again.

Behold!

GWBBQ posted:

I have a 2000 Honda Accord, 2.3L engine. Tried recharging it and refrigerant blows out of the suction line where the rubber and metal meet near the compressor. When I replace the line, will I need to add oil or just refrigerant?

If there doesn't look to be any oil leaked out, don't worry about it. Don't forget to change the drier!

DJ Commie fucked around with this message at 04:59 on May 27, 2018

GWBBQ
Jan 2, 2005



DJ Commie posted:

Behold!


If there doesn't look to be any oil leaked out, don't worry about it. Don't forget to change the drier!
Thanks! The service manual says it only needs to be changed if the system is open for a prolonged period of time, but I guess having a leak bad enough to dump all the coolant qualifies as being open.

INCHI DICKARI
Aug 23, 2006

by FactsAreUseless


Have yet to see I cant believe its not Freon as a thread title

GWBBQ
Jan 2, 2005



Yay, there's apparently another leak in the A/C system somewhere. Going to go with windows down 24/7 even in pouring rain to keep them defogged.

The Jabberwocky
May 31, 2006

At least it worked.

Crossposting this question here from the stupid questions thread after being reminded that this thread is a thing I should read:

I have a '14 Fiesta ST that has had a clicking blend door actuator for about a year. I've ignored it, both because I'm a lazy, bad car owner and because aside from it clicking annoyingly for about 10 seconds at startup it hasn't messed any of my HVAC stuff up. Last week, though, my AC just stopped blowing cold. Okay, I figured, this is the stupid blend door finally telling me to actually change it. I installed the new part and the clicking stopped, but I still have no AC. I've disconnected the battery overnight to maybe prompt the ECU to notice the new part or reset or whatever, but that didn't change anything either.

So is the AC quitting on me coincidence, or is there a chance I screwed up the part install? I didn't think the blend door actuator controlled the actual AC kicking on/off, but as far as I can tell the compressor is just not kicking on at all. There's no squealing from the belt or leaking fluid (that I can see) like I would expect from a seized compressor, but I'm also not super experienced and may be missing something obvious. Anybody have ideas?

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





If the blend door was the reason, you should be getting heat, not just not-cold air.

Get some gauges on the system and start diagnosing.

SeaGoatSupreme
Dec 26, 2009
Ask me about fixed-gear bikes (aka "fixies")

The '14 fiesta st has a problem with the compressor that causes it to seize if it's been left off for too long. I'd assume that is the problem, and the worst part is that it's not under warranty anymore.

KakerMix
Apr 8, 2004

8.2 M.P.G.


Top Cop

Is it a thing where you start using the AC on a car that might not have had it used very much for a while, and for it to improve and work better? Like some sort of issue that works itself out?

I have a JDM 1985 Toyota Hilux Surf (turbo diesel) with factory air conditioning, still on R12. I bought it with the expectation that the compressor didn't even turn on, hoping for a lack of refrigerant. It gets here though and not only does the compressor turn on, but the AC actually functions. At first it seemed week, would seemingly short cycle (where the compressor would kick on and off) but now it will shut off 10~ or so minutes after a solid running, then turn on a minute or so later and stay on for another 10 minutes. I don't know how it is supposed to operate but it certainly seems to me like it's improved and all I've done is use the AC more. Now too there is a bunch more water that will drain underneath the truck, where before I wouldn't see any water and had to actually go underneath to make sure the drain tube wasn't clogged (it wasn't).

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



KakerMix posted:

Is it a thing where you start using the AC on a car that might not have had it used very much for a while, and for it to improve and work better? Like some sort of issue that works itself out?

I have a JDM 1985 Toyota Hilux Surf (turbo diesel) with factory air conditioning, still on R12. I bought it with the expectation that the compressor didn't even turn on, hoping for a lack of refrigerant. It gets here though and not only does the compressor turn on, but the AC actually functions. At first it seemed week, would seemingly short cycle (where the compressor would kick on and off) but now it will shut off 10~ or so minutes after a solid running, then turn on a minute or so later and stay on for another 10 minutes. I don't know how it is supposed to operate but it certainly seems to me like it's improved and all I've done is use the AC more. Now too there is a bunch more water that will drain underneath the truck, where before I wouldn't see any water and had to actually go underneath to make sure the drain tube wasn't clogged (it wasn't).

Well, I could imagine sticky/hardened/unlubricated seals in the compressor freeing up and sealing better as it gets use, and more importantly, as lubricating oil circulates.

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!

Pillbug

So, maybe someone can help me:

I've rebuilt multiple AC systems in my lifetime, but my wife's Volvo has got me stumped. Her Volvo has a known issue with the compressor clutch and pulley where as the compressor runs, the pulley heats up to the point where it slightly expands, and the clutch can no longer engage the pulley until it cools down again.

I've replaced it with a different Volvo compressor with the same issue, so I'm resolved to just rebuild the installed compressor. Should I just replace the clutch itself?

I think the 'recommended' forums fix is to shim the clutch with bread clips, but I'd kind of like a better solution.

CommieGIR fucked around with this message at 16:17 on Jun 1, 2018

MC Hawking
Apr 27, 2004

by VideoGames


Fun Shoe

Applebees Appetizer posted:

The blower is right under the filter so it's easy to inspect, and it's fine. Filter was fine too.

However as an experiment I ran the ac without the filter and it did much better, but i need to try after the car has been sitting overnight to see what it does that will be the definitive test. Is it possible the aftermarket filter is too restrictive? Maybe I need an OEM filter?

What was the followup diagnosis on this? Your issue sounds virtually identical to what I'm experiencing in the Mazda 2.

Terrible Robot
Jul 2, 2010

FRIED CHICKEN


Slippery Tilde

CommieGIR posted:

So, maybe someone can help me:

I've rebuilt multiple AC systems in my lifetime, but my wife's Volvo has got me stumped. Her Volvo has a known issue with the compressor clutch and pulley where as the compressor runs, the pulley heats up to the point where it slightly expands, and the clutch can no longer engage the pulley until it cools down again.

I've replaced it with a different Volvo compressor with the same issue, so I'm resolved to just rebuild the installed compressor. Should I just replace the clutch itself?

I think the 'recommended' forums fix is to shim the clutch with bread clips, but I'd kind of like a better solution.

Just replace the clutch itself. Alternatively do the bread clip trick because it's cheap, easy, and works a treat.

bandman
Mar 17, 2008


So Iíve finally had an AC issue in my 2000 4Runner that has about 330k miles on it. I drove through a field that had a bunch of plants with some kind of dandelion-type fuzz and it clogged my radiator. I pressure washed it off, but I think I may have nicked my condenser in the process, because my AC started to get worse yesterday and was totally gone today. I shot a can of R134 in and it started cooling again, so the system itself is healthy.

Can I get away with replacing the condenser and drier myself and having a shop vac the system and fill it? Or should I suck it up and get a set of gauges and a vacuum pump? Also, will I have to figure out the oil thing if I donít see any leaked out? Should I just measure how much was in the condenser and add that much back?

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



My 2003 Jetta's AC is not very cold this year. After reading the awesome OP I'm going to get manifold gauges and try to recharge it myself the right way (assuming nothing needs to be repaired, which I hope is the case since I can't even remember the last time it was charged and it's sort of working just not as cold as usual). The $50 harbor freight set of gauges have some not too great reviews but there's a lot of other inexpensive sets on amazon. Is there a worthwhile set in the sub $100 range? Also, when recharging a system, how much R134a will it generally take? Should I just buy one can and hope it'll be enough, or does it usually take multiple cans? The suggestion in the OP was just to use one can to start, but is a basic recharge often more than one? Obviously I can just go buy more, but I like to be prepared if I possible.

BloodBag
Sep 20, 2008

WITNESS ME!





My first suggestion to you, is when adding r134, is to purge the yellow line at the gauge body. I hosed up my miata's AC and introduced air into the system by not letting the 134 purge the air out of the lines first, same goes for your red and blue lines. Everyone seems to gloss over this step. Look for youboot videos on purging AC manifold gauge lines.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



BloodBag posted:

My first suggestion to you, is when adding r134, is to purge the yellow line at the gauge body. I hosed up my miata's AC and introduced air into the system by not letting the 134 purge the air out of the lines first, same goes for your red and blue lines. Everyone seems to gloss over this step. Look for youboot videos on purging AC manifold gauge lines.

And yes, this means that you will have to let a little bit out into ~*the environment*~.

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!

Pillbug

Darchangel posted:

And yes, this means that you will have to let a little bit out into ~*the environment*~.

Still better than R-12, and we let people dust their PCs with compressed R-134A and R-152A

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



CommieGIR posted:

Still better than R-12, and we let people dust their PCs with compressed R-134A and R-152A

I know, I'm being facetious.
Before that, air dusters were R-12.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



My manifold gauges and R134a showed up so I'm going to give it a shot. I sort of think the USPS would frown on how they packed these pressurized cans:


Don't worry, they doubled up on bubble envelopes.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



I mean, they are pressurized, short of being impaled by sharp objects which are also properly impackaged there's not much that's gonna hurt em. And global warming aside R134a isn't exactly a hazardous material even if it were to burst.

FatCow
Apr 22, 2002
I MAP THE FUCK OUT OF PEOPLE


BloodBag posted:

My first suggestion to you, is when adding r134, is to purge the yellow line at the gauge body. I hosed up my miata's AC and introduced air into the system by not letting the 134 purge the air out of the lines first, same goes for your red and blue lines. Everyone seems to gloss over this step. Look for youboot videos on purging AC manifold gauge lines.

When considering the overall volume of gas in a AC system, is ~.25 ft^3 of air at STP really relevant in the slightest?

bandman
Mar 17, 2008


Update on my 4Runner ac problem:

Well, the problem wasnít my condenser. The bolts that hold up the drier worked their way loose, so it dropped down and the liquid line from the condenser to the evaporator was resting on the core support and it wore a hole in the line. Itís an $8 part, so Iím gonna get a new line, new drier, and some o-rings, shove some refrigerant in the son of a bitch and call it good.

BloodBag
Sep 20, 2008

WITNESS ME!





FatCow posted:

When considering the overall volume of gas in a AC system, is ~.25 ft^3 of air at STP really relevant in the slightest?

It was enough to spike pressure in that tiny system.

Bajaha
Apr 1, 2011

BajaHAHAHA.



The issue is the air is a non condensable in the AC system and as pointed out you really don't need a lot of it to cause issues as it circulates throughout the system. Automotive refrigerant systems are actually quite small volume so the air in unpurged lines is more than significant than you think.

I don't have data to back it up, but even in the commercial and industrial systems I've been exposed to, which range in size from tens to hundreds of tons, you need to be mindful of purging your gauges before charging. Automotive AC systems are almost universally microchannel condensers which are particularly picky about charge and contaminants due to their more restrictive nature.

As an aside, did any automotive AC come with a standard fin and tube condenser coil?

Terrible Robot
Jul 2, 2010

FRIED CHICKEN


Slippery Tilde

Bajaha posted:

As an aside, did any automotive AC come with a standard fin and tube condenser coil?

A lot of older R-12 systems use them. By old I mean like, 1970s and earlier though. Most of the 80s cars I've worked on have had parallel flow condensers.

Fender Anarchist
May 20, 2009

Fender Anarchist



My old '91 Blazer was R12 and I'm pretty sure it had a single-channel condenser, google images of it sure look like one. So at least that late. Much more feasible to actually flush if needed.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Yeah my C10 is non parallel flow.

And the bigger concern with air in the lines is the moisture content. Water reacts with the oils and becomes acidic.

Darchangel
Feb 12, 2009

Tell him about the blower!



Data point: Ď79-Ď85 Mazda RX-7s are serpentine condensers. The one currently in my Ď79 is stopped up and caused some really weird gauge readings - before blowing the connector off the high side hose on my cheap gauges. Super high on the high side, and super low on the low side. Makes sense after I thought about it for more than a minute.

Queen_Combat
Jan 15, 2011


The compressor in my 08 P71 is starting to get...tick-y. Making tick-tick-tick sounds when its running. At first I thought it was something stuck in the radiator fan, but only happens with the A/C on.

I have no idea if it's always been that way, or if I've just started to notice because I've been out in the heat and leaving the cabin of the car with the car still idling to do things like pick up Amazon Locker packages, whereas I used to shut the car off. But now I'm worried and that worry won't go away I replaced the serpentine a few months ago but I think that's unrelated.


(I know it's the compressor because I can shut the AC off but keep the blower fan going, and listen to the compressor slowly get quieter as the noise fades).

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





How much of a pain in the dick is it to get at the compressor?

Way I see it you've only really got two choices. Run it until it shits the bed and possibly end up cleaning out / replacing much of the A/C system due to contamination, or replace it proactively and just do a compressor swap / recharge.

I'd give it a few weeks to see if it's changing at all or if it stays the same.

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!

Pillbug

Looks like its not terrible, its mounted on passenger side bottom of the block itself.

Colostomy Bag
Jan 11, 2016

C-Bangin' it



Posted this in the tools thread and then remembered there was an A/C thread...

Anyone have experience using a freon sniffer (yeah I know a few here do)? I picked up a HF version (yeah yeah, but ain't going to fork over several hundred on this little side project of mine). And of course with that last statement, probably answered my question.

And to add to that, when trying to pull a vacuum it gets to about 21 inches. A far cry from 30. Returns to 0 within oh say several minutes. I'm thinking this is some gaping leak but already tried dye and can't spot anything. Evap coils perhaps, but the sniffer didn't pick up anything from the vents.

If filled up with r134a, you get about a week out of it.

CommieGIR
Aug 22, 2006

If Godzilla can do it, you know I can deliver!

Pillbug

Yeah, you got a leak. Vacuum should be stable for 10 minutes at at least.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





Even with chinesium equipment I can pull a full vacuum and have it stay exactly where it was for half an hour. Definite significant leak.

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Colostomy Bag
Jan 11, 2016

C-Bangin' it



I'm fairly certain I know where part of it is thanks to the sniffer...but it is sort of confusing. Visually parts of the hose/fittings show signs of oil seepage and well, they just look sort of bad. But at the same time the engine bay has 140K on it and who knows if it is just the usual grime at that point.

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