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UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST
Jul 19, 2006

mea culpa


LadyPictureShow posted:

Iím 99% sure the carnival thing was invented wholecloth for the show, but out of curiosity was there any evidence that the Franklin expedition people set up parties?

Apparently British Naval ships going to the Arctic were supplied with all that masquerade poo poo Fitzjames finds precisely because the sunless winters were so depressing. I think it's pretty plausible that they used them at some point. The level of attention to historical detail, outside of the whole marauding bear spirit thing, is actually really high.

https://www.canadiangeographic.ca/a...recap-episode-6

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UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST
Jul 19, 2006

mea culpa


I've got misgivings about giving us a literal on-screen bear monster thing especially on a TV budget, but I think it would be a weaker show dramatically if it were just the expedition stumbling headlong into a catalogue of 19th century ignorances that the audience know better of. I actually like how they're crediting the protagonists with predicting or uncovering the historically documented mistakes they're making as they go along, but mixing in the supernatural dimension to restore the air of mystery and dread for the audience to actually share in.

UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST
Jul 19, 2006

mea culpa


I have to admit I thought the opening scene was a straightforward flashback for a moment even if it didn't make any sense to cast a slightly younger actor with a different look, but amongst other things the real Hickey in the opening actually has an Irish accent. It's really fun to revisit the earlier scene where Crozier has a drink with Hickey on the premise of Irish underdog brotherhood, and realise he accidentally furnishes some sociopathic English fugitive with a wild idea of reinvention as a Royal Navy careerist, leading directly to the kidnapping of Silence and the "as a boy" scene.

UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST fucked around with this message at May 2, 2018 around 23:32

UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST
Jul 19, 2006

mea culpa


Hasselblad posted:

Uh, I don't think these guys read the book very closely toward it's end. It was not "her Tuunbaq". It was a literal god (there was only one) that the shamans kept at bay with offerings so it would not come and devour their peoples souls. They did not control it and it wasn't their pet. The reason it was not nice with the white sailors is that the Shaman's agreement was that Tuunbaq could have the entire arctic for itself and only the Shaman would venture there.

I took "loses her Tuunbaq" to mean that she's the priestess to a dead god. The show never implies that she has actual control over it. In general I'm not particularly concerned with what's in the book because everything I've heard sounds as if it was improved in the adaptation, and also that Dan Simmons is off his loving rocker.

As for the crew left on the ships I thought it was communicated pretty clearly in their dialogue with Crozier that it was always considered a long shot for the ships to sail again and that the men primarily volunteered to die in familiar surroundings rather than leave.

UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST
Jul 19, 2006

mea culpa


Quixotic1 posted:

I was confused with Jopson's final scene, he looked angry but a part of me wants to say he just wanted to just get back to his captains side, pushing aside food that would nourish him and seeing an illusion of him at his best.

I thought that scene was a great expression of how Jopson was feeling over his abandonment: that Crozier at his best was an illusion, hence he's pompously overdressed, detached, literally going through the empty motions of leadership. A great detail it's easy to miss is how grotesque and unappetising the mirage-banquet actually looks; it's a weird stylised mess of jellies, feathers, and chicken legs. The series did a fantastic job with the counterintuitive idea that if all these men are doomed from the start, how they choose to face it down matters a lot.

UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST
Jul 19, 2006

mea culpa


LadyPictureShow posted:

Usually in a show like this, at least a couple of the actors put in a clunker of a performance, but this series had goddamn dynamite performances from even the shipís pet dog. Are most of the cast stage performers or character actors in general?

Yep, most of them have a strong theatre acting background. The casting agent deserves a lot of credit though, the older actors are fairly well established in the UK and Ireland but everyone under 40 was unknown to me and have pretty thin film/TV credits. Apparently Adam Naigaitis (Hickey) and Jared Harris (Crozier) are both going to be in an upcoming HBO series about the Chernobyl disaster, so that could be a winner.

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UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST
Jul 19, 2006

mea culpa


Zagazunt posted:

Did I miss the explanation for why the rescue party Crozier originally sent out was not only dead (understandable), but decapitated and arranged as they were ? Watched this series over the last week, it has me pretty horny for arctic exploration.

Between that and the bisected person combo we can infer that the creature has an extremely unanimalistic penchant for psyops.

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