Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
  • Post
  • Reply
Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

Fancy.


Jikes posted:

That would take Dr John Rae. He was shown as a character in the first few minutes of the first episode of the series, he's the man who shows the Inuit hunter the three photos of the expedition command, when the hunter picks out Crozier as Aglooka. The real Rae was an exploring machine who got sent to the area by the Hudson Bay company and who spent all of his time trekking around the Arctic solo on skis and snowshoes, living off the land the way the Inuit taught him. He's also the only one of the Franklin searchers who thought to ask the Inuit what the hell had happened to them. He got the first solid evidence of the expedition's fate that way, and the oral histories he took down and preserved were a large part of what led to the eventual finding of the ships. Read his books on Project Gutenberg for free, Rae was a badass and a good writer too.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Rae_(explorer)

Rae's story was a bit of a shame. He collected what information he could find and accurately confirmed the fate of the expedition, including the very strong prospect that the survivors had probably resorted to cannibalism to keep going, but when he returned to Britain and reported his findings he was attacked by Lady Franklin (who was very popular both in London society and with the population at large), her celebrity supporters (one of whom was Charles Dickens, who wrote extensively on the topic) and the government.

It was variously because the search for Franklin and his men had been a cause célèbre at every level of British society for years at that point and the saddest outcome wasn't because anyone wanted to hear, because it demonstrated that Royal Navy discipline collapsed far more quickly than either the Admiralty or the public were willing to acknowledge, because the information came from the Inuit and people were racially prejudiced against them, etc.

No doubt that's why it was never "Sir John".

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

Fancy.


LadyPictureShow posted:

E: I think it’d be cool if they dramatized other lost expeditions either with or without ‘wooooooo mythical monsters’ like the ‘Arctic Balloon Expedition of 1897’
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/S._A._Andr%E9e's_Arctic_Balloon_Expedition_of_1897

Either Umberto Nobile's attempt to fly a zeppelin to the North Pole (his arch-rival Roald Amundsen vanished while joining the rescue effort) or the trek of the Donner Party would be interesting even without supernatural creatures showing up to eat people (because they did that themselves).

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

Fancy.


An historically-accurate Donner Party show made by the same people who made this would be cool.

Wheat Loaf
Feb 13, 2012

Fancy.


Polar (wahey) opposite of Franklin's lost expedition: Burke and Wills.

One was too cold, the other was too hot.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply