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LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



a lovely king posted:

I believe it's Goodsir and Bridgens at the end of this episode. But this show does suffer a little, especially early on, from identical uniformed white dude syndrome.

It took me a few episodes to get into it because I have this problem to the max. I’m home sick with a nasty cold, so I rewatched the first two episodes again since I had started to nod off anyway.

They really needed to give some characters like, a jaunty neckerchief or facial scars.

I’m 99% sure the carnival thing was invented wholecloth for the show, but out of curiosity was there any evidence that the Franklin expedition people set up parties?

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LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST posted:

Apparently British Naval ships going to the Arctic were supplied with all that masquerade poo poo Fitzjames finds precisely because the sunless winters were so depressing. I think it's pretty plausible that they used them at some point. The level of attention to historical detail, outside of the whole marauding bear spirit thing, is actually really high.

https://www.canadiangeographic.ca/a...recap-episode-6

Oh that’s really interesting. I didn’t know they’d have that stuff on the ship.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Hasselblad posted:

Only thing that I about the episode was the in-charge doctor acting ho-hum about the obvious lead poisoning and the next moment lighting everything, himself included, on fire. Really escalated quickly. Was watching on a horrible old small TV where everything was too dark. Did pooh bear bite her tongue out? To match her state in the book

She did it to herself, saying something about Tuunbaq not having a master anymore (or something along those lines).

I was a little confused about the doctor pulling a 180 myself. He seemed pretty ho-hum about the lead poisoning when Goodsir brought it up, then the one patient (the guy with the headaches) asked about his daughter. So I wasn’t sure if he’d gone deranged from lead poisoning/realizing the futility of their situation, or if he just decided euthanasia was the quickest was out and he’d help everyone else whether they wanted it or not.

E: I think it’d be cool if they dramatized other lost expeditions either with or without ‘wooooooo mythical monsters’ like the ‘Arctic Balloon Expedition of 1897’
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/S._A._Andr%E9e's_Arctic_Balloon_Expedition_of_1897

LadyPictureShow fucked around with this message at Apr 25, 2018 around 18:19

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Comrade Koba posted:

It’d sure be a nice change to have a series about the Arctic expedition where the recovered remains of one member show signs of them being...attacked by a polar bear.

Hahaha, you got me on that point. I said that one because they could do ‘woooooo spooky things when they developed the photographs’. I forgot one of them got eaten by a polar bear.

Also, who thinks it’s a good idea to try and fly a hot air balloon to the arctic?!

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Phi230 posted:

It's a good thing the show is done after this season and that these dumb goon anthology ideas aren't coming to pass

Its adapting a book, not a pulp magazine, any future anthology would be poo poo, like game of thrones after they stopped adapting the books

Sorry to hear about your lame un-lost expedition.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Toxic Fart Syndrome posted:

Didn't look like he was eating them, but it was definitely premeditated, imo, because he stripped his uniform so he wouldn't get any blood on it.

Honestly, for half a second I forgot everyone is going to die and had a bit of hope when they found the Eskimo party.


I haven’t read the book, so I was kind of assuming at least a few of the crew would just take up with the Eskimos and not go back to civilization or something.

When Irving met the Eskimo party and went back to tell Hickey and the other guy the news, I don’t think I’ve ever gone to so fast.

I’m curious if they established Hickey as being an imposter that stole the enlistment papers in the book ? I’m assuming they added that bit in to like, not offend any of his descendants?

‘My great-great-great Uncle wasn’t a murderous cannibal!’

‘Uhhh... oh, some guy stole the realHickey’s papers.’

‘Oh, fair enough then.’

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Hasselblad posted:

My only criticism beyond not understanding much of the dialogue

I’m a dummy because I was like ‘what is everyone’s issue with the dialogue?!

Then I remembered I watch just about everything with CC on because I have some hearing issues.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Vaporware posted:

Not debating the quality. I actually love me some Hardee's/Arby's most of the time.

Following a rather intense cabalism scene... what advertising doofus ok'd that?


Back in an early season of the Walking Dead, one of the characters stabbed a guy then threw him into a horde of zombies; there was a close-up of the zombies ripping into the man’s torso, then it cut to a KFC commercial.

All the deaths were sad and handled well, Crozier seeing out Fitzjames, Jopson and Blanky were all really good (in the sense of acting and emotional weight), Blanky finding/marking the Northwest passage when he went off alone

And that second to last shot of Crozier’s crew doctor (can’t think of his name) laying down on the ground and curling up, followed by Lady Jane taking her shoes off to step into the snow was just so bleak and hopeless.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Based on another comment, did Jopson not die yet? I did like Crozier coming to look in on him and told him the cow story as a reverse of how Jopson cared for him and told him stories when he was getting hit hard by withdrawal, but I may have misread the scene as Jopson on death’s door and them just not showing the burial.

Crozier taking care of Fitzjames made me so sad (I watched the scene again), considering how much the two characters grew and bonded over the series. Fitzjames was pretty disdainful of Crozier at the start, then it evolved to Fitzjames telling Crozier about his illegitimacy and ‘Are we brothers, Francis?’

At the end of the series I need to sit down and maybe binge the whole thing, mostly because I had some problems telling guys apart early on, and watching week-to-week hasn’t helped.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



a mysterious cloak posted:

Just finished the last episode. My only quibble with the series was Hickey. you saw him coming from a mile away. And who would follow this guy, anyway? Most of those low level guys had never been on an arctic voyage, so there's no way in hell they'll survive alone.

I thought the rest was stellar. Watching this with headphones on was the best. I need to find recording of ships creaking and popping for my white noise at night.

There’s an album called ‘Salt Marie Celeste’ that is spooky atmospheric boat music.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3xC4DK6G0do

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Oh God, like I said earlier in the thread, I thought Jopson quietly drifted off after Crozier was telling him childhood stories.

I...much would have preferred that to be what happened.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



etalian posted:

The rope and fork scheme was brilliant, as well as his parting insult to the virgin tuunbaq.

The tug on the rope making the tines on the forks pop up like a porcupine was a great little effect.

Quixotic1 posted:

I was confused with Jopson's final scene, he looked angry but a part of me wants to say he just wanted to just get back to his captains side, pushing aside food that would nourish him and seeing an illusion of him at his best.

The anger (and boy does Liam Garrigan emote well) was him deliriously believing Crozier and the rest had abandoned him whereas previously they’d dragged the sick and weak in the sledges.

That for all Crozier had said and done before, he didn’t actually give a poo poo about his men, only himself and his position.

LadyPictureShow fucked around with this message at May 29, 2018 around 03:09

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Professor Shark posted:

Yeah, him dying with his last thoughts being that despite all his service and loyalty, Crozier had abandoned him, when we know (and the book stresses this even more iirc) that Crozier's primary concern is his men makes it extra painful

Then Crozier finding Jopson’s dead body face down with one arm still extended, showing he’d expired that way .

It was also sad that Little sat all the ‘able’ survivors down for a strategy meeting, intending to follow Crozier’s explicit plans, but they explained they had taken a vote while he’d still been asleep and ‘you were outvoted sir’.


A friend of mine watched on my recommendation and went on this rant about Hickey ‘how could anyone follow him? He was crazy etc etc etc, why did they take so drat long to hang him?! Why didn’t someone kill him?!’

I basically brought it down to conditions, Hickey scheming that since Crozier had a larger group and weren’t leaving the ill/injured, Tuunbaq would probably go after them, and like what Hodgson told Goodsir about why he couldn’t off Hickey himself: ‘But I’m hungry... and I want to live.’

Usually in a show like this, at least a couple of the actors put in a clunker of a performance, but this series had goddamn dynamite performances from even the ship’s pet dog. Are most of the cast stage performers or character actors in general?

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



UNRULY_HOUSEGUEST posted:

Yep, most of them have a strong theatre acting background. The casting agent deserves a lot of credit though, the older actors are fairly well established in the UK and Ireland but everyone under 40 was unknown to me and have pretty thin film/TV credits. Apparently Adam Naigaitis (Hickey) and Jared Harris (Crozier) are both going to be in an upcoming HBO series about the Chernobyl disaster, so that could be a winner.

After watching this, I secretly hope Harris plays the reactor engineer trying to save everyone, and Naigaitis is in the role of the increasingly unstable reactor.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



On a rewatch, just look at Blanky’s chat of his experience with Ross at Fury Beach it kinda foreshadows the winding of the following eps

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



LesterGroans posted:

They didn't state it outright, but I assumed they were. Henry even had a sketch of Bridgens' tattoo in his journal. That seems like the sailor version of writing "Mr. Henry Bridgens" surrounded by hearts in your trapper keeper.

Episode 6 (burning carnival ep), Peglar came in to chat with him, and it seemed like even if they weren’t together, they might have had a little something going on in the past.

E: after they get out of the tent, Peglar’s pushing through the crowd, and when he spots Bridgens, they hug. Still ambiguous if they were just good pals

LadyPictureShow fucked around with this message at May 30, 2018 around 13:22

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Well, I was reading an account about the Inuit stories regarding what was seen and passed on over the years regarding the expedition, and this is even grimmer than the show

quote:

“They were beings but not Inuit,” he said, according to the account by shaman Nicholas Qayutinuaq.
The figures were too weak to be dangerous, so Inuit women tried to comfort the strangers by inviting them into their igloo.
But close contact only increased their alienness: The men were timid, untalkative and — despite their obvious starvation — they refused to eat.
The men spit out pieces of cooked seal offered to them. They rejected offers of soup. They grabbed jealous hold of their belongings when the Inuit offered to trade.
When the Inuit men returned to the camp from their hunt, they constructed an igloo for the strangers, built them a fire and even outfitted the shelter with three whole seals.
Then, after the white men had gone to sleep, the Inuit quickly packed up their belongings and fled by moonlight.
Whether the pale-skinned visitors were qallunaat or “Indians” — the group determined that staying too long around these “strange people” with iron knives could get them all killed.
‘That night they got all their belongings together and took off to the southwest’Qayutinuaq told Dorothy Eber.
But the true horror of the encounter wouldn’t be revealed until several months later.
The Inuit had left in such a hurry that they had abandoned several belongings. When a small party went back to the camp to retrieve them, they found an igloo filled with corpses.
The seals were untouched. Instead, the men had eaten each other.

And, the expedition strikes from beyond the grave!

quote:

In 1854, Rae had just come back from a return trip to the Arctic, where he had been horrified to discover that many of his original Inuit sources had fallen to the same fates they had witnessed in the Franklin Expedition.

An outbreak of influenza had swept the area, likely sparked by the wave of Franklin searchers combing the Arctic. As social mores broke down, food ran short.

Inuit men that Rae had known personally had chosen suicide over watching the slow death of their children. Families had starved for days before eating their dog teams. Some women, who had seen their families die around them, had needed to turn to the “last resource” to survive the winter.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Here you go Octy!

quote:

In order to figure out whether end-stage cannibalism happened, Mays and Beattie looked at three Franklin Expedition skeletons for evidence of burning, for specific patterning of fractures in the bones, and for evidence of “pot polish,” where broken or cut bone ends become smooth from being tossed in a metal or ceramic vessel during cooking.

None of the bones the researchers studied were burned, but there was some evidence of smashing while the bones were fresh. However, it is unclear if these breaks were made by people immediately after death or by animals trampling on them much later.

But when Mays and Beattie found pot polish on two leg bones, they knew there was clear evidence that someone boiled parts of these men’s bodies for at least 20 minutes in a cooking pot. Even more interesting is that one of the bones with pot polish was probably also reused. After its marrow was consumed, someone used the human bone fragment as a spoon or knife to scrape more fat from the rim of the pot.


In cool science stuff, here’s an article about how they figured out one of the skeletons was Goodsir:
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2011...klin-expedition

And in spooky timeline lore:

quote:

1852–58 (?): Inuit may have seen Crozier and one other survivor much further south in the Baker Lake area
Guess Blanky stabbed his way out of Tuunbaq. The Chad ice master lives another day!

The Franklin Expedition always fascinated me, I had a book on mummies as a kid and there were photos of the Franklin ice mummies in there. ‘I gotta learn more about this!’
*a week later, at the library, reading the back cover*
‘Dad, what’s this word mean? ‘Canablism’?’

LadyPictureShow fucked around with this message at May 30, 2018 around 21:25

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



I also think that the Uruguayan Rugby team survivors from the Andes crash (yanno ‘Alive’) said that after a while with the hopelessness, the isolation, the cold, and the starvation (as well as having to subsist off of their dead friends to gain any sustenance) some of them started exhibiting odd behavior. And they were ‘only’ there 72 days and didn’t have to haul sledges.

They were hitting ‘end-stage’ too by the time they were rescued. I read an interview with one of the survivors talking about how they had only eaten the meat at first, but when that was running out, they got desperate, first eating the organs and later cracking bones to get at the brains and marrow for any kind of sustenance.

Some of the weird behavior by the Franklin crew could be explained by lead poisoning, yes, but also by how loving hopeless things had become.

LadyPictureShow fucked around with this message at May 31, 2018 around 23:04

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Despera posted:

Doesn't really explain how the RIP Franklin note had the wrong year. Why the huge officer death count in said note. Why a boat was found filled with 40 pounds of chocolate and two skeletons. Why they had 3 years worth of food but were starving to death in year 3. Why those 4000 pound sledges had a fuckton of books and other random poo poo in them. Why they resorted to cannibalism instead of eating seal meat in that innuit story. Why they splintered up so hard.

These are off the top of my head and im no expert on the expedition.

Scurvy can be an explanation for all of that. Heck, even now there’s some doctors stressing that if a patient shows up with new, unexplained emotional/mental problems, doctors should run a blood panel to look at vitamin c levels and see if there’s a deficiency. That part can show up before you hit full-blown scurvy.

And since scurvy and high lead concentration teamed up on these guys, along with starvation diet, no wonder they all went weird.

As for the high officer death count, could have just been coincidence, lousy weather, etc.

LadyPictureShow fucked around with this message at Jun 1, 2018 around 16:07

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



etalian posted:

In a related note Inuit history Louie Kamookak passed away this year.

He worked to interview inuit families on Franklin expedition stories passed down as oral history.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...ks-dies-aged-58

Oh wow, that’s sad. It’s also such a bummer that a lot that could have possibly been explained about the Franklin expedition, at least once they left the ships/got to the death march part is that the Inuit were basically ignored out of hand, except for the really lurid bits of ‘they ate each other’.

David Woodman wrote two books in the 90s Unravelling the Franklin Mystery: Inuit Testimony and Strangers Among Us.

Some bits from an in-depth review of Strangers, which based on Inuit testimony collected, suggests that it probably wasn’t just all of the crew leaving at once or that Crozier and Fitzjames were just scurvy-addled morons by that point to make such a decision.

quote:

He believes that the goal of reaching the Fish River was more likely to hunt the game which was reported to be abundant in the area, or to contact the Inuit who were known to congregate there. He argues that one or both of Franklin's ships were later re-manned; one almost certainly was, as it was discovered by a coastal band of Inuit anchored off an island far to the south in Queen Maud Gulf. Furthermore, while those who remained on King William Island eventually starved to death (not before resorting to cannibalism, an Inuit observation verified by recent forensic evidence), the crew of the surviving ship evidently remained through an additional winter (the Inuit reported that the ship was housed-in as for winter quarters, and its gang-plank was lowered), and some number of survivors left her and made one final attempt to reach a British outpost.

quote:

There are also a number of instances where the behavior of these strangers seems strange indeed, such as when they deliberately scared away some Inuit boys -- hardly a coherent act for desperate survivors. Still, some evidence, such as tales of sign-posts with pointing hands (a known trademark of other Franklin camps) found along the land route eastward of the Fish River, admit of no alternate explanation; whatever else can be said, it's clear that the whole story of Franklin survivors cannot be reconciled with the previously accepted tale of a single abandonment followed by a single drive south to the Fish River, much less an ascent of it.

quote:

Woodman's final case -- and his strongest -- is for a small party of three or four men who were said to have spent a season with a Netsilik hunter named Too-shoo-art-thariu. These survivors arrived in the spring, and stayed through the summer and possibly even the winter following, eventually heading south towards the Hudson's Bay post at Fort Churchill. One of these survivors was indeed said to be named "Aglooka" -- which was Captain Crozier's Inuit name, acquired through name-exchange many years previous when he was a young midshipman with Parry's expedition. Unfortunately, many white explorers were also known as "Aglooka," and so the precise identity of this man would be almost impossible to determine, were it not for two strong pieces of corroborative evidence. Firstly, this man told his Inuit hosts that he had been with Parry at Igloolik, a fact they could not have otherwise learned; Crozier was in fact the only Franklin Expedition member who had. Secondly, another young Inuk, apparently a son of Too-shoo-art-thariu, told almost the same story to a whaling captain many years later, and another whaling captain down in Hudson's Bay heard that Aglooka/Crozier had made it as far as Chesterfield Inlet.

Whether or not this survivor was in fact Crozier -- which Woodman, who believes that Inuit stories of the death of a captain earlier in the expedition concern Crozier, thinks he was not -- his story is one that cannot easily be brushed aside. He was certainly not an Etkerlin, and his circumstances and travels do not correspond with either of Dr. Rae's visits to the area. He evidently wore an officer's uniform, and among his gifts to his hosts was a naval sword -- neither of which could apply to Rae. This "Aglooka," in fact gave 'nearly everything he had' to Too-shoo-art-thariu before departing with a Netsilik guide and a companion said to be a servant or steward, for the overland route to Chesterfield Inlet. The Qairnirmiut of Wager Bay, through whose country he would have passed, reported his presence there to their contacts among the Netsilik, whom Hall later interviewed. Finally, a certain Captain Fisher of the whaler Ansel Gibbs reported to Hall that he had heard that this stranger had starved or possibly been killed after he arrived, though the evidence (and possibly the translation) was sketchy.

Sorry for the long bits, but all of the Inuit testimony fascinates me because it goes against a lot of what has been speculated previously, and had mostly been shrugged off in the 1860s. I wonder, despite the strong oral tradition among the Inuits, how much information has been lost.

Since their were rumored sightings of Crozier and ‘a steward’ (yay! He saved Jopson after all! ) in the mid to late 1850s, then maybe, say, Crozier and some crew doubled back to a ship and wintered there, while Fitzjames’s crew pushed on hunting for game and looking to come across Inuit groups.

LadyPictureShow fucked around with this message at Jun 1, 2018 around 22:00

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



etalian posted:

Well figuring out what happened is challenging since following expeditions only found a single note in a cairn that explained he current status. It is pretty amazing how the Inuit oral histories were so accurate all the way down to helping locate the wrecks of the Erebus.

The horror story of the Batavia by comparison had multiple primary sources since many of the survivors kept detailed diaries recording all the events that occurred in the disaster.

Back in the early days of trying to figure out what happened/finding the remains of the parties, Thomas Barry, in 1872, had interviewed some Inuit and he reported:

quote:

They said nothing about valuables being put in the cairn or cache; only the books- putting their hands upon the journals in my cabin. They said the books the white men put in the cache were of no value to them, the Netchelli, and they did nothing about them, and they were still there.

There was dispute about that story, most figuring the interviewees were referring to a cairn that Rae (a Franklin searcher) erected during his work, since they couldn’t count the number of years ‘on their fingers’ and their responses translated to ‘long time ago’ and ‘a great many winters past [since seeing white men other than Barry and Potter]’ and that the pidgin Inuktitut used in the interview was pooh-poohed for its accuracy.

I’m wondering how much potential info was lost for not checking that out.

Aside from the RIP Franklin paper, about all they’ve got in found writings to this day is the ‘Peglar Papers’ (excerpts of which the titles ‘Terror Camp Clear’ and ‘The C, The C, The Open C’ came from), which was found with a skeleton searchers figured to be Armitage.

E: Yeah the Batavia was creepy as Hell too

LadyPictureShow fucked around with this message at Jun 1, 2018 around 23:58

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



A professor of dentistry was inspecting some of the skeletal teeth and put forward that Addison’s disease could have offed a number of the crew, relating to the scurvy/lead/botulism.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releas...70814121049.htm

quote:

The Schwatka expedition (1878–80) documented that several Inuit families had observed sailors of the Franklin expedition dragging ship’s boats in Washington Bay on the southwest coast of King William Island, Nunavut, Canada. The Inuit reported that the men appeared thin and the mouths of some of them were hard, dry, and black. Many Franklin scholars believe from this description that the surviving crews were suffering from scurvy and possibly lead poisoning.

Armed with these scant clues, Taichman decided to investigate the prevailing cause-of-death theories, and study how each condition may have affected the sailors’ oral cavities. With the help of University of Michigan librarian Mark MacEachern, Taichman cross-referenced the crew’s physical symptoms with known diseases and analyzed over 1,700 medical citations. To his surprise, Addison’s disease kept popping up during the analysis.

“In the old days, the most common reason for Addison’s in this country was TB,” noted Taichman in a press release. “In this country now, it’s immune suppression that leads to Addison’s.”

People suffering from Addison’s have trouble regulating sodium, so they get dehydrated easily. The disease also makes it difficult to maintain weight, even when food is available. Together, these two symptoms, argues Taichman, helps to explain the wasting condition of the crew, and particularly their oral cavities, as documented by indigenous peoples.

Scurvy, a deficiency of vitamin C, was definitely also problem for the doomed crew members, but Taichman says this disease couldn’t possibly be responsible for all the deaths. Lead poisoning—confirmed by an analysis of recovered bones—may have come from lead solder used for the cans and from lead pipes that distilled water for the crew.

“Scurvy and lead exposure may have contributed to the pathogenesis of Addison’s disease, but the hypothesis is not wholly dependent on these conditions,” Taichman said. “The tuberculosis-Addison’s hypothesis results in a deeper understanding of one of the greatest mysteries of Arctic exploration.”

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Did the Burke and Wills expedition get posted here before?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bur...ills_expedition

19 men went on an expedition across Australia to try and map a route from Melbourne to the Gulf of Carpinteria.

Some of the info reminded me of the unnecessary items found in the Franklin expedition sledges, like the books and silverware.

quote:

The expedition took a large amount of equipment, including enough food to last two years, a cedar-topped oak camp table with two chairs, rockets, flags and a Chinese gong; the equipment all together weighed as much as 20 tonnes
...
The expedition reached Swan Hill on 6 September and arrived in Balranald on 15 September. There, to lighten the load, they left behind their sugar, lime juice and some of their guns and ammunition

Burke and Wills got impatient because the govt was offering a big monetary reward for a south-north crossing, and they thought they’d get beaten to the prize, so they split the group. Later, Burke decided ‘poo poo yeah, forget waiting out this Australian summer!’ So Burke, Wills, Charles Gray and John King set out to the gulf.

On the return to the depot where they left everyone else they were short on food, monsoons hit, so they resorted to shooting and eating their camels (yes they imported camels) and horse. Gray killed a big ol’ python, which they ate and they got dysentery right after. Burke, who was also sick, thought Gray was bullshitting about being sick and beat him (possibly to death). The three surviving guys, Burke, Wills, and King, made it back to where they had split off from the rest of the expedition, but found those guys had ditched out a few hours before, figuring they were never coming back. Wills and King wanted to go the route indicated in the letter left in the supply cache, but Burke said ‘Nah’, and they headed for Mount Hopeless, but forgot to remark the cache.

A resupply doubled back, didn’t see any new markings, and figured Burke and co never came back.

Burke, Wills, and King had to kill and abandon their last two camels, couldn’t carry supplies and were exhausted and malnourished. But then, Aborigines showed up and were giving them food in exchange for sugar. They were saved!

...until Burke shot at one of them and they all ran.

Burke and Wills died from either malnutrition or beriberi, but King came across a friendly group of Aborigines who took him in. Instead to shooting at them like Burke had, he instead shot at birds to help earn his keep. He hung out for three months until a rescue expedition found him, and he lived for 11 more years though his health was pretty bad for the rest of his life.

It was a big ol clusterfuck, basically , and out of the four men that reached the gulf of Carpinteria, only John King made it back alive. They gave him a gold watch and a yearly pension.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



bitchymcjones posted:

Australia has 1 mil.+ feral camels now because of expeditions like this.

drat, really? That’s kind of like how Germany has a raccoon problem because a baron or Kaiser imported them because he wanted to hunt different stuff. Or the multitude of snakes and Capybaras on the loose in Florida.

Are the camels mostly in the outback?

etalian posted:

Also in typical heroic failure fashion they got statues and special coins to remember the expedition.

John King (the only survivor of the whole trek) only got a puddly little plaque/monument.

LadyPictureShow fucked around with this message at Jun 10, 2018 around 16:03

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



MOVIE MAJICK posted:

What was the point of dressing up in forks for the bear?

Like a blowfish or porcupine. So when Tuunbaq ate Blanky, it’d cut up his insides something fierce.

He decided ‘Welp, I’m gonna die, but I’m gonna gently caress up that Bear when I do.’

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



bitchymcjones posted:

No actors from The Terror got an Emmy nomination. Disappointing.

(I hope Darren Criss gets it. He was so creepy in Versace)

I’m not exactly up on when Emmy nominations end for a given year. Would The Terror be nominated for next year’s Emmys? Though even if it was, people will probably have forgotten it by then.

Jarred Harris deserves Emmys for categories he’s not even eligible for.

People have no goddamn taste.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



zoux posted:

To be eligible for this year's Emmy, a show must premiere before April 27. The Terror premiered at the end of March

Well that’s some straight up bullshit.

LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Zagazunt posted:

Did I miss the explanation for why the rescue party Crozier originally sent out was not only dead (understandable), but decapitated and arranged as they were ? Watched this series over the last week, it has me pretty horny for arctic exploration.

They just got caught by Tuunbaq; it arranged body parts before like the top half of one guy set on top of the bottom half of another guy after it had bisected both of them.

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LadyPictureShow
Nov 18, 2005



Hasselblad posted:

So basically akin to Goldblum giving the aliens a virus in Independence Day?
Bleh.

I think it was also implied that consuming poisoned/sick crew and Blanky's fork defense had already weakened it. I seem to remember Crozier suggesting something along those lines.

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