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Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Tired Moritz posted:

also heavenly creatures is the best peter jackson movie
you should watch the frighteners

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Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





SatansBestBuddy posted:

I still hold Meet the Feebles up as the Peter Jackson movie you need to see at some point, not because it's good but because you most likely haven't seen anything else like it.
Meet the Feebles is definitely his most important work, but it makes you wait too long for the fox's song to be his best.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





OSW, hands down. They're just such boys, while also still delivering thorough retrospectives on a subject they're fans but not fanboys of.

I found them a few years(?) ago when I was watching wrestling with my autistic brother in an attempt to connect with him better, and it kind of occurred to me that I'd watched when I was young but had no idea what happened between the somewhere in the early 90s and now when some old wrestler turned up - probably Undertaker - so I went looking for some history on youtube and they popped up covering basically the exact blank spot I had, and I've listened to everything since.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Usually you want to let people explain or expound their meaning for themselves rather than assume meaning which supports your already held beliefs. You guys didn't do that. Therefore your posts are bad.




I watched Infinity War today with one of my brothers and afterwards he brought up Lindsay's Hobbit series and we chatted about that through the insanely generic credits music. It sounds like it's being passed around a bit on NZ social media, which is pretty cool.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Waffles Inc. posted:

For what it’s worth, the third of Ellis’ Hobbit videos is great! And I think the reason why is that it seems to have a thesis which isn’t contingent on taste, something like: The Hobbit movies were terrible for the NZ film industry and represent the worst excesses of state and corporate partnerships

That’s supportable using evidence—and is! It’s a compelling video that puts forth a good case for why consumption of The Hobbit comes with some ideological baggage, which is radically different from saying, “The Hobbit films are bad movies”, which can never be more than reducible to personal taste
I didn't see any substantive difference in the thesis presented in the third part than in the first two. That is, I did not take the first two parts at all to be a criticism of The Hobbits as bad films - yes, they were films Lindsey clearly didn't think were as good as they should have been - but all of the specific arguments I can recall were very clearly presented from the perspective of how The Hobbits were made influencing the why of The Hobbits Bad (Subjective ofc). Tonal shifts were discussed in context of the need to stretch the story to incomprehensible length, changes to the characters from the book were mentioned alongside the need to have those characters be more developed because they needed to have character arcs people were engaged in throughout the movie because it's no longer just Bilbo's baker's dozen adventure. The whole thing is virtually punctuated by her mentions of studio interference; narrative pressures both in length, scale, and tone; and generally what a clusterfuck the actual act of accomplishing the movie was.

Like, the discussion of the reuse of the Ringwraith theme wasn't about whether you thought it was a cool theme or not - it wasn't Lindsey dinging them like CinemaSins. It's presented as a piece of evidence in how badly the Hobbits were made - not how bad they are. The legal epilogue was not a divergence from the rest of the videos, it was a progression on how this terrible process which sucked for almost everyone involved that you can see through the fingerprints it leaves all over the film - regardless of whether you enjoy the film or not - had real world consequences outside of producing a film that you may or may not wish to spend 10 hours with.

From my perspective, all of her points in all the parts were supported with evidence. The evidence wasn't that the films are bad, and the points weren't that the films are bad. Her individual points were that some part or parts of the films were the results of certain events outside of the films that affected its production, with the overall point being that the process of making the film was not a good one, with a product that was the result of the process and oh yeah it hosed up other things outside of just making that product so wasn't that process really really bad?
All three parts are about the same thing - the only difference is that the first two focus on the effects of it on the films, and the third is about the effects of it on the country.


I hope she had some hokey pokey ice cream while she was here.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Yardbomb posted:



Also these lame pricks are so pitiful at coming up with new material or arguments that they've STILL just gotta keep on with ~political correctness~ in the year of our lord 2018, even though that phrase hasn't been used in earnest in how loving long, pretty much because they have a choice of that or channer slang by this point, which is usually outright bigoted rather than "You know what I'm sayin" bigoted like the "PC GONE MAD " crap.
This farcical comic is very flattering to JonTron's gross as gently caress neck goatee.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Groovelord Neato posted:

is it one of those where you kill god at the end and he's a lil amish fella?
Yes, and you saw him in half.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





RoboChrist 9000 posted:

It's not just you. It's one of my many issues with the prequels. The Jedi as described and implied in the Original Trilogy sound a lot more like knights errant in space than they do stoic space buddhist monks. You got the sort of new age/pop culture eastern mysticism from Yoda and poo poo, but the overall vibe from what we hear and see of the Jedi sounds more like wandering ronin and space knights, not monastic folks with an organized hierarchy who sit around writing and contemplating books.
Knights errant is a much better take on it - certainly the originals make it sound like they were remnants of formal organisation, but one that is hundreds of years older than the living memory the prequels recast it as. But why wouldn't they have books? Lucas explicitly based them on his understanding of samurai, who were one of the few literate classes of feudal Japan and wrote often. Miyamoto Musashi, one of the most famous wandering swordsmen, wrote The Book of Five Rings which was literally a training manual for his school of swordsmanship.

I took the books to be much more in that vein, like kung-fu manuals, where after the wandering and fighting takes their inevitable toll the Jedi might settle down with their paddywagons and record their thoughts and techniques to serve as a reference and legacy for their students.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Idran posted:

Wait, that does more than just give you push notifications? I've always just gone to the Subscriptions page to see new stuff and used the bell to get alerts for updates on specific channels; does that make it show up on the front page more often too or something?
No, the bell just gives you push notifications.

I've never pushed the bell because I just use the Subscriptions page and thrown things on Watch Later from there, but it seems like virtually nobody knows there's a Subscription page and that's why tubers went a little bit mental when the bell was introduced.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





business hammocks posted:

The red letter media skits are dire garbage. They’ve long since put the umbrella of that tired double-irony “bad on purpose look we’re winking this isn’t a genuine attempt to be funny isn’t that funny?” they use when they’re ashamed of something.

But I guess they’re afraid their mid-30s teen audience would be mad if they just spoke honestly about movies they had something to say about.
Re-view, which is their only show where they do that, has no skits???

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Some people don't like using the term man-child.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





doctorfrog posted:

Hell, same for Night Court. RIP Harry Anderson.
Just watch Night Court in its entirety. It stands up.



Also, I got a youtube suggestion to watch Kimble(?) Justice talk about Chaos Engine, which is one of my favourite games ever so I did, and I think I've listened to Kim on and off for two or three years, and had no idea that on-camera appearances were once a thing. loving sweet hair, if I may say so.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





stillvisions posted:

Some parts of that show have aged real badly, like sexual-harasser-with-a-heart-of-gold Dan Fielding. No fault of John Larroquette, but yeah.
I disagree he has a heart of gold.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





marathon Stairmaster sesh posted:

2 days off before the 1 year anniversary of Kim Justice's vid doc on Duke Nuken Forever.

Other "Randy Pitchford loves Duke Nukem and Borderlands too much" escapades:
The Sega vs Gearbox lawsuit over Aliens Colonial Marines
A duke nukem 3D remake cancled because it would make DNF look bad imedatily instead of the "oh god I went through the game" slowburn. The team involved in the remake later made the Rise of the Triad remake and Bombshell.
Rereleasing Bulletstorm with a Duke Nukem DLC that is literally a model swap and voice lines with the DNF Duke model.
Spite remark: Murdering Brothers in Arms by turning it into the prototype of Borderlands even if said prototype was cancled.
When they got the license they also pulled the Duke Nukem 3D Megaton Edition from Steam, which was $10 for the original game plus three licensed expansions, and replaced it a year later with their own Duke Nukem 20th Anniversary World Tour which was $20 for no expansions except a fifth episode designed by the guys who made Duke Nukem Forever.

Bombshell was also originally a Duke Nukem game, because why not.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





By far the most egregious part of Book of Henry is how all Janice needed to do was watch some ballet.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Groovelord Neato posted:

this is like saying text crawls are the only good parts of movies.
I've seen the prequels and Rogue One, so yes.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





You are correct.



There are no good parts of that movie.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





I think it exists simply because Blizzard needed a new location outside of the established continents and there's been a vocal section of their fanbase asking to play as them ever since the lead artist put his fursona into Warcraft 3. Like, before it was made people were saying that WoW's success in China was the very thing preventing Pandaren from being put in the game.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





I remember at the time I was really jazzed to get to play as a Broken, but I guess people needed boring space elves with generic crystal technology.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





I like the opening video, but the art style is very generically contemporary.

My only concern would be how many packs of cigarettes a day they have Mumm-Ra on. I say would be because I was emotionally invested in children's cartoons in the 80s, not in my 30s.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





I haven't thought of Thundercats in years, but one thing I always liked was that the bad guy is a frail old man who just wants the cats to get off his drat lawn.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Every version of TMNT would be improved if all four turtles just kinda squished together while Splinter yelled "AND I'LL FORM THE HEAD".

I played a lot of NZ Story as a kid I had no idea there was a Heaven level, let alone multiple.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Sephyr posted:

Ok, I gotta ask this: Is having a laggy connection really such a boon in playing online fighting games? I see dopes like DSP and others blame their losses on the opponent "cheating with a bad connection and doing lag combos", and it just eludes me. Living in South America, having a bad connection always meant being delayed and bodied by everyone else in every game, but I'm not big of fighting games so I'm not sure the netcode compensates or something.

Or I may be giving them too much credit.
In general, fighting games are high precision affairs with things like block stun, chains, and so forth requiring inputs within half a dozen frames. In the arcade era this reward people with good timing. In the online era it can really affect what strategies are viable or what options you have because you lose like a quarter of your reaction time even with a good latency. Depending on the game and lag compensation, this can make some strategies (aka "cheapness") a lot safer to use online than in a local tournament because while the game is made for you to punish or avoid the strategies within a certain timeframe, that timeframe is radically reduced or in some cases impossible to meet due to the time constraints between communicating what's happening to your client, displaying it on the screen, and receiving instructions from the controller and getting those back to wherever the 'authoritative' version of the game is running before your window of opportunity elapses.

Specifically in the case of like Streetfighter V which had like 5 frames of lag just between the controller and your game it meant that any attack which normally would give you a 5 frame advantage was basically impossible to punish online because by the time you saw it the window had already closed. (It also didn't help that it would always assign one player as the sole authority on the game state, so only their opponent would be the one seeing the lag).

If you have a connection that's good enough to play on with teleporting rollbacks or any obvious stuff, just really kind of eh, you can absolutely abuse it to do 'combos' or pressure that was not intended because it diminishes the opponent's ability to react to them.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Trojan Kaiju posted:

Really Berserk gave us skeleton wheels and that's what absolves it, really.
I mean, it's that or the Middle Ages.

business hammocks posted:

Why was it called Thundercats Roar instead of Thundercats Ho?
These days you would probably get some complaints about using that term in a children's show.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Mokinokaro posted:

Not really much else to say. Cancer is an rear end in a top hat.
Is this really the time for puns?

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





the last firing neurons in my brain will carry the thought "thank god i have no social media profile to @"

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Archer666 posted:

entire ethics thing.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Calaveron posted:

Watch_dogs, woof
Which is somewhat ironic since it was built on the grave of the Driver franchise.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Lucas himself has said that editing for his movies is his ace in the hole.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Yardbomb posted:

Uplay is fine in that it's just a lightweight thing to run a game through, Origin still sucks, neither have community or chat stuff as good as steam.

Also did steam patent shift + tab for their overlay or is it just too convenient for everyone else to think of, because every other launcher's shortcut is like shift + F2 or alt + F1 or similar , why.
At least for Uplay they still sell their games on Steam so not using the same shortcut is a good design choice and probably included in their contract.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Conrad_Birdie posted:

Who's a fun internet reviewer that focuses on horror movies? That's not Night Mind or Phelous?
Ryan Hollinger

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





I don't find him obnoxious and the sound of his voice doesn't cause me to instantly tune out.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





MonsieurChoc posted:

Reminder that bitcoin is accelerating global warming.

Reminder that blockchain is just an intentionally inefficient and slow database.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Taintrunner posted:

Yeah that part was really cool, when that bad guy in red closest to the screen had a direct opening to slash Rey right in the back, and he realizes the choreography is hosed up, so he intentionally adjusts to whiff his swing with the staff so he can go down like a common mook, and it somehow made it into the final cut of the film that was released in theaters. I really stood up and cheered and was blown away by Rey's inherent ability in the force to deflect blows by sheer force of thought, it really made me invested in that character's fate.
What kind of dickhole stands up in the theatre during an action scene.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Groovelord Neato posted:

how is it so hard not to be racist when you have the easiest job on earth.
Their success is built on their personality and values validating those of their audience - not those of the platform.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Leal posted:

I feel that this image is appropriate.


This image somewhat over-exaggerates the water chip's importance to Fallout's plot.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





It's almost like it reflects society back at itself rather than creates society from whole cloth.

Absurd Alhazred posted:

Wasn't there a mobile Fallout game that was kind of like what he's describing?

Yes. It did have combat in it though, but poetically enough the reason I stopped playing was every time they updated they increased the amount of combat you had to deal with to the point where every two minutes Deathclaws would invade your base and force you to spam health packs on your max-stat-max-level guys because you weren't allowed to out-level any enemies.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Dapper_Swindler posted:

pretty much. i mean in rome they had dudes beating the poo poo out of each other(sometimes to the death) in gladiator rings and they were viewed as celebrities.
Though not in the same sense that we would use the word. They were admired for their prowess, but being a gladiator of any kind was also seen as a low-class non-productive job that someone should be ashamed of, and almost as bad as being an actor. Some kinds of gladiators were even worse.

business hammocks posted:

There’s absolutely no internally consistent moral rubric that would allow the deliberate extinction of an animal species in pursuit of an end to suffering, but how anyone can go far enough down that path to think about sharks and mosquitoes but not see humanity as way worse is extremely dumb and lazy.
That's a strawman though. The article linked isn't about the deliberate extinction of an animal species - it's about allowing natural extinctions to take place, even though they might be anthropogenic; or, in more radical cases extincting predation by genetically altering the species. The internal consistency is that they do not see changing tigers from meat to soy as an extinction but an externally created evolution in behaviour, the same way that humans might choose to "internally evolve" as a vegan - except we are making the decision for them rather than for ourselves.
I mean, it's a batshit idea that won't reduce suffering in the world (because desire is the root of suffering), but it is internally consistent without autogenocide.

Max Wilco posted:

The thing with this tweet is that I can sort of sympathize with that sentiment to a degree. ... However, it made me realize that there's a glut of media nowadays that all have this really dreary, glum, depressing theme to them, and it gets exhausting.
I think that's a valid criticism, but I think it's possible to make it without the implication that it's a result of media being made to "promote" these attitudes to people, like there's some kind of group that controls all media and uses it push an agenda on the populace. People make cynical art because they are cynical and art is fundamentally self-expression, and they consume cynical art because everyone enjoys being reassured they have the correct beliefs. It's a good time to peddle apocalypticism because everyone already believes the world will end, so indulging in heroic fantasies about coming out the other end as something other than baked slime is comforting.

Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





It's a survival crafting open-world multiplayer game where you can play alone but also everyone you encounter is a real person.

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Ghostlight
Sep 25, 2009

maybe for one second you can pause; try to step into another person's perspective, and understand that a watermelon is cursing me





Dapper_Swindler posted:

https://twitter.com/radicalbytes/st...010065533337601

christ, this dude has issues. how the gently caress does he make a couple thousand dollars per video? this isn't deep art critiques. its loving whinging.
I think his perspective is very telling because in the presentation the nuke gameplay element was framed very much in the sense of "I've put a gun on the table. Who will pick it up and will they fire it?"

That's a very interesting and human question. Of course people will drop the nukes because it's a videogame and there's no consequences except maybe getting a nuke dropped on you later in some kind of mutually-assured destruction pact, but I don't really see how that could illustrate empathetic lessons about the retributive nature of the cycle of violence not just between nuclear-backed powers within the world, but between those who could later achieve the ability to escalate historical grievances to nuclear retribution.

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