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High Warlord Zog
Dec 12, 2012


Oxxidation posted:

the ending was the culmination of the ecological devastation that had been happening in the background of all the personal drama going on through the last several centuries of narrative. proulx knew exactly how to end it - with the barkskins' final descendent desperately trying to assure herself that there must still be a way for them to undo the damage they've caused, as the seas quietly continue to rise

Thematically, yes, it ties up really well, but I felt like the final set of characters and the present-dayish incarnations of the settings were much less well conveyed than everything that came before

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Idle Amalgam
Mar 7, 2008



I appreciate the recs. I probably should check out other southern gothic classics. I love how McDowell handled the supernatural and otherworldly.

Anyone read or listen to Bellefleur by Joyce Carol Oates? I've seen it recommended in searching for stuff similar to Blackwater.

ScootsMcSkirt
Oct 29, 2013





Just finished listening to The Cipher by Koja. Goddamn that was a good book and the narrator did an excellent job. He sounded so drat tired, especially by the end, it was perfect

Book left me feeling gross and icky and depressed and I imagine thats the point. It was incredibly overbearing and rife with evocative imagery. Just fantastic and something thats gonna be stuck in my head for awhile

I'm looking for something a bit more lighthearted next so I'm going with either Skullcrack City cause that looks fun or maybe The Meg since im a child and love gruesome creature features

PsychedelicWarlord
Sep 8, 2016




Just finished Blackwater and ahhhhhhhhhhh. I think I could have read 800 more pages about the Caskeys.

Conrad_Birdie
Jul 10, 2009


PsychedelicWarlord posted:

Just finished Blackwater and ahhhhhhhhhhh. I think I could have read 800 more pages about the Caskeys.

That’s the general consensus yeah

Pistol_Pete
Sep 15, 2007

I disagree! Only 2 Princesses have died. That is one of the smallest number of dead Princesses you can have.


Oven Wrangler

Ornamented Death posted:

Most anything by Skipp and Spector with the caveat that their books meet your criteria but lack the humor of JDatE.

Comedy option: Have you heard of Edward Lee?

The Light at the End is a beautiful (ok, perhaps that's not the right word) evocation of grimy, dangerous 1980's New York. Quite apart from its merits as a horror novel, it's become a period piece that pictures a New York that doesn't exist any more and it's fun to read for that reason alone.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Also their Book of Dead release (it is a collection of other writer’s stories) might be the best zombie fiction in book form of all time.

Ariza
Feb 7, 2006


Can anyone recommend any books that deal with suicide? Thanks!

Conrad_Birdie
Jul 10, 2009


You okay?

szary
Mar 12, 2014


Ariza posted:

Can anyone recommend any books that deal with suicide? Thanks!

'The End' by Gary McMahon

Len
Jan 21, 2008

Pouches, bandages, shoulderpad, cyber-eye...

Bitchin'!



No. 1 Juicy Boi
Jun 1, 2003

#1 JUICY BOY



Buglord

Ariza posted:

Can anyone recommend any books that deal with suicide? Thanks!

The last story, "The Good Husband", in Nathan Balingrud's North American Lake Monsters deals with this theme and is absolutely heartbreaking but amazing.

But also


Ariza
Feb 7, 2006


Sorry, yeah I'm ok! Sunglasses emote was meant to be silly, bad taste. Just trying to deal with another friend shuffling off and I realized horror is how I best understand horrible things.

Son of a Vondruke!
Aug 3, 2012

More than Star Citizen will ever be.



No. 1 Juicy Boi posted:

The last story, "The Good Husband", in Nathan Balingrud's North American Lake Monsters deals with this theme and is absolutely heartbreaking but amazing.

This one is really good. It's the best story from an already great collection.

The Vosgian Beast
Aug 13, 2011

Business is slow

Ariza posted:

Sorry, yeah I'm ok! Sunglasses emote was meant to be silly, bad taste. Just trying to deal with another friend shuffling off and I realized horror is how I best understand horrible things.

Geez that's rough. Hope the recommendations help, in whatever way they can.

Artelier
Jan 23, 2015




No. 1 Juicy Boi posted:

The last story, "The Good Husband", in Nathan Balingrud's North American Lake Monsters deals with this theme and is absolutely heartbreaking but amazing.

Putting in another vote for this. I still think about it more than half a year later, absolutely stellar and haunting.

Conrad_Birdie
Jul 10, 2009


Ariza posted:

Sorry, yeah I'm ok! Sunglasses emote was meant to be silly, bad taste. Just trying to deal with another friend shuffling off and I realized horror is how I best understand horrible things.

I’m really sorry at the loss of your friend. My sympathies are with you, and I also understand relating to bad things happening through horror. You’re not alone. We’re a bunch of weirdos here with ya.
For actual recommendations I would suggest a collection of Thomas Ligotti’s short stories. A lot aren’t explicitly about self-harm but there’s a sad, existential dread to many of them.

High Warlord Zog
Dec 12, 2012


Ariza posted:

Sorry, yeah I'm ok! Sunglasses emote was meant to be silly, bad taste. Just trying to deal with another friend shuffling off and I realized horror is how I best understand horrible things.

Legend of a Suicide by David Vann. Not strictly speaking horror, but the centerpiece novella of this short story collection is exceptionally visceral and nightmarish.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






House of Leaves dealt with loss in a way that meant a lot to me

Shaman Tank Spec
Dec 26, 2003

*blep*




I'm reading The House Next Door and the book is fine, but somehow the author's writing style just ... bugs me, in some way that's hard to put to words.

Maybe it's that there's this weird almost pseudo smug undercurrent of late 70s middle upperclass white lifestyle bullshit everywhere, including dropping brand names, talking about dressing casually in slacks, talking about "having money", name-dropping job titles and roles etc.

I'm interested in seeing where it goes, though. The second couple just moved into the titular House Next Door and things are about to go from bad to worse, probably.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Is that the Siddons’ book (the title has been used a lot)?

Shaman Tank Spec
Dec 26, 2003

*blep*




nate fisher posted:

Is that the Siddons’ book (the title has been used a lot)?

Yeah sorry, should have clarified. The Siddons one yes.

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Zartosht
Jan 14, 2010

King of Kings Ozysandwich am I. If any want to know how great I am and where I lie, let him outdo me in my work.




Fitzy Fitz posted:

House of Leaves dealt with loss in a way that meant a lot to me

All I remember about that book is "I won't let you gently caress me, but you can cum on my tits"

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