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Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

In on the ground floor. Most recent horror things I've read and enjoyed have been Behold the Void (short story collection) by Philip Fracassi and Ballad of Black Tom (novella) by Victor LaValle. Looking forward to Paul Tremblay's latest, The Cabin at the End of the World.

Has anyone read Kill Creek by Scott Thomas? I haven't (yet) but my understanding is that it falls under the haunted house theme.

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Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Franchescanado posted:

edit: Anyone else like Joe R. Lansdale? I liked quite a few stories in his short story collection Writer of the Purple Rage. He's the only modern southern horror author I know.

I love the guy Ė would have asked him to be added to the OP but it's kinda hard to file him under a heading besides "Joe R. Lansdale", because he's massively prolific and has written pretty much everything.

When it comes to King, I was reading his stuff obsessively as a kid, then went through a bleh-he-sucks hipster phase, and now I can once again appreciate his better stuff, which probably still outnumbers most of the competition on a word by word basis. Salem's Lot and Different Seasons (especially The Body) immediately spring to mind as really good King books.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Franchescanado posted:

What's another good Lansdale book or collection (preferably) to read? Hap & Leonard novels are already on my radar.

He's got tons of short story collections out but it looks like Electric Gumbo covers most of his best-known stories that aren't in Writer of the Purple Rage. Hap & Leonard series is good, although for me it took a downward turn around Captains Outrageous. For standalone novels I really like The Bottoms for that southern / To Kill a Mockingbird vibe, and Nightrunners is a good example of his splatterpunk-era stuff (although I haven't read that in ages so not sure if I'd feel the same today). If you're into comics, his Jonah Hex stuff is hilarious. That should get you started!

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

A human heart posted:

Pretty cool this dude wrote a book about his cock with a pic on the cover and everything

Yup, sounds like David J. Schow.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

MockingQuantum posted:

Paul Tremblay's latest book The Cabin at the End of the World came out last Tuesday, anybody picked it up yet? I have about three books I need to finish before I get to it, but it'll be the next thing I pick up.

Just started it last night, got high hopes based on his earlier stuff.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Iíd give Barronís short story collections a shot before writing him off, Xís For Eyes really isnít a great starting point or all that great in general.

My Cabin at the End of the World trip report: if you liked the previous Tremblay books, I donít see why this would be much different. The (attn: spoiler, kind of) same element of is-it-real-or-not ambiguity is present once again. A Head Full of Ghosts remains my favorite though.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Not strictly one for this thread but if you dig Laird Barron you should check out his crime debut Blood Standard - itís got that tough-guy feel of his early stuff and some of the cosmic horror elements as well, and writing for a bigger audience has helped cut down on those interminable descriptions of inchoate howling voids of cyclopean encyclopedias.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

I canít even remember the end of Kingís original The Mist novella but I hated the Darabont filmís ending.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Keep the spicy one-line takes coming, can't get enough of them!

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Hate Fibration posted:

Bartlett is one of those authors that I wish I liked but always found really annoying for some reason. I tried reading Gateways to Abomination and was left overall with an impression of disjointed, slightly gruesome imagery and weak characters.

Same, I've tried reading that more than once and it just doesn't grab me at all.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Ulio posted:

Any horror books where the setting is just one place? Ala Haunting Of Hill House.

Paul Tremblayís recent Cabin at the End of the World. Itís been a while since I read it, but Kingís Misery more or less fits the bill as well.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

I donít know if itís just the way horror fiction has evolved over time but when I last reread MoM I found myself constantly thinking that the narrator spends a lot of time circling obvious conclusions like Ēhey those ancient monsters were actually alive and were defrosted and killed everyoneĒ. I guess itís his rational scientific mind refusing to go there, but come on. Had the same issue with Charles Dexter Ward.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Re: Blood Standard, my comment in this very thread was "itís got that tough-guy feel of his early stuff and some of the cosmic horror elements as well, and writing for a bigger audience has helped cut down on those interminable descriptions of inchoate howling voids of cyclopean encyclopedias."

I reckon that's about right, but I haven't really thought about that book since I read it. A decent book, not amazing, but I'll probably read the next one.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Anybody read Cody Goodfellow? I liked a short story of his I recently read in Black Static and then noticed that I had Radiant Dawn and Ravenous Dusk on my Kindle, probably from some Humble Bundle Iíd forgotten about. Radiant Dawn I found a nice, quick conspiracy theories + black ops + horror mishmash and Ravenous Dusk (the sequel) seems promising as well.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Read both Lake Monsters and Wounds in the past couple of weeks. Some real gut-punch moments in the former, while I really enjoyed the latter's original visions of hell. The Black Iron Monks and the demons in The Maw made me wish I was a better artist, because those would be really cool to draw...

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Started the new John Langan collection, Sefira and Other Betrayals. The titular story (which is a decent novella length) was otherwise enjoyable, but in parts he was doing the same thing that annoyed me about The Fisherman, namely trying to pass narration off as a character monologue. It simply doesn't sound like anything a human being would say. Langan can do decent dialogue as well, which just makes it more grating.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Bilirubin posted:

Got my hands on a copy of Wounds, wish me luck, heading in

Wear an iron box over your head and youíll be okay.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Bilirubin posted:

Finally was able to get to it and after the first story I understand this now

Its good.

It really is.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Traxis posted:

I just watched the Wounds movie, it was really bad

Can you expand on that take? I thought it wasn't perfect, but overall a really solid adaptation.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Kindles donít wrinkle when reading in a hot bath.

I only really buy physical books now if theyíre particularly awesome editions or include some gimmick that works better on paper. Books are great, but they take up a lot of space and I just love having tons of stuff to read without taking up half of my luggage when going somewhere. Itís the same as iPod vs carting around a pile of CDs back in the day.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Len posted:

How is Salem's Lot?

One of Kingís best IMHO. All of his positives (setting, characters, readability) without the negatives (bloated length, shaky plotting, silly premise).

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

the_enduser posted:

Finally got around to Laird Barron's Blood Standard but was really hoping for more horror. It was decent for straight up crime novel but is there any thing with more horror vibes?

Have you read his short story collections? The Coleridge novels have some horror elements but like you say, they are crime fiction. The short stories are where Barron made his name and where he still shines imho.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Lester Shy posted:

Speaking of Ballingrud, I finally finished Wounds today. Overall, it was pretty disappointing as a followup to NALM. Aside from "The Maw," none of the stories really grabbed me. Didn't help that I was listening to the audiobook, and the narrator for Skullpocket was complete dogshit.

Personally I prefer Wounds, I just love Ballingrudís whole Hell mythos. The Butcherís Table didnít do it for you at all?

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Untrustable posted:

I looked at The Only Good Indians on Amazon so many times that Amazon sent me a half off credit. I hear good things though.

I keep meaning to buy that one anthology that everyone suggests but it's always put to me in such a way that I think it would gently caress up my already distressed mind. North American Lake Monsters? Is that what it's called?

NALM is a short story collection by Nathan Ballingrud rather than an anthology. Itís good tho.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

To me the worst thing about The Fisherman was the narrator decision, which seems tacked on and simply doesnít work in places.

I finished There Is No Antimemetics Division and while it wasnít quite mindblowing, it had some very cool and original ideas I liked a lot.

Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Fitzy Fitz posted:

Everyone praises "Skullpocket" and "The Visible Filth," but "The Butcher's Table" was so loving cool. I want more stories like that.

I feel like The Butcherís Table definitely gets a lot of praise, it was nominated for the World Fantasy Award (and is my personal favourite). The Visible Filth of course got adapted into a movie but not sure Skullpocket has stood out that much hype-wise.

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Fire Safety Doug
Sep 3, 2006

99 % caffeine free is 99 % not my kinda thing

Finished Blackwater, itís an impressive work but not one I fully loved. Could have perhaps done with a few more horror moments, although they are quite effective when they do come along.

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