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Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Conrad_Birdie posted:

I think it was someone in this thread that recommended I'm Thinking of Ending Things. Couldn't put it down, finished it in a couple hours; it was a wave of relief after being supremely disappointed in a book that I had been looking forward to reading ended up being a pretentious slog. But I had no expectations going in to ITOET, and it knocked me off my feet. One of the best novels I've read this year.

I also enjoyed the book quite a bit, but only after I was done (if that makes sense). Until then I was busy puzzling out why their interactions seemed so off-putting until everything clicked when they got to his parents' house.

It was a pretty good chaser after the insanely stupid, awesome 80s-movie book The Shaft

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Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



I read Black Tom because people said it was good cosmic horror with a different perspective. I didn't realize it was supposed to be a companion piece and I probably still won't read the Lovecraft story.

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Traxis posted:

Can anyone recommend any books that have a found footage/mysterious signals/numbers stations vibe? So far I've read:
House of Leaves
Transmission by Ambrose Ibsen
Experimental Film by Gemma Files
The Last Days of Jack Sparks by Jason Arnopp
and the short story collection Lost Signals

What's your opinion on those books? I'd like to try some out.

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



julietthecat posted:

Finally, Into the Void by Brett Talley and My Sweet Satan by Peter Cawdron are also about humans in space encountering mysterious vessels and, perhaps, aliens who may not have humans' best interests in mind. Both are pretty bad. Into the Void is reminiscent of Event Horizon, and is by far the better of the two if you do check one out.

Brett Talley’s career is way more entertaining than any of his books so just save your money and google his name instead

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



let ligotti have a season of true detective

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Is there a place where people have had a good discussion on North American Lake Monsters? I just finished it today and I've got lots of questions about what certain stories were all about since I'm totally thick when it comes to themes and symbolism.

I think "Wild Acre" was probably my favorite story.

Fallom fucked around with this message at 23:40 on Jul 15, 2019

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



a foolish pianist posted:

I think this is the best place on SA to discuss it. Which stories are you wondering about?

Mainly the titular one. What was the monster supposed to represent? Why did its substance adhere to the father, and what was the significance of the glow that animals carried away from it as they devoured it? What's the meaning of how the daughter saw the monster when she made her drawing? Is there a horror element here beyond the father struggling to reintegrate with his family after leaving prison and falling back on his (self) abusive behavior?

I feel like answering the first question would probably be enough to help me understand the rest.

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Wounds was so good! It’s like Ballingrud took the best elements from Barker’s Books of Blood and Lovecraft’s Kadath stories.

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Catfishenfuego posted:

I've now read two collections of Laird Barron and I can safely say I do not like Laird Barron.

I don’t either

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Len posted:

Are there any other books like Annihilation only good? I really like the style of someone writing about exploring someplace that's just wrong. The Navidson Record was the better part of House of Leaves and the SCPs about that are the best of them.

Audiobooks would be preferred so I could listen in the car and at the gym.

Speaking of which, I just realized that there's a properly formatted eBook of the SCP archive: http://www.scp-wiki.net/ebooks

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



unpacked robinhood posted:

Check out The Dark Behind the Stars. I wouldn't call it horror but it's pretty bleak and I love it

It’s “Beyond,” not “Behind.” Thanks for bringing it up - I read this ages ago but couldn’t remember the title for the life of me.

I really liked The Explorer and The Echo by James Smythe (and all the rest of his books, but they aren’t space horror). It’s a weird recommendation because I think his writing is kind of rough but something about it is very evocative.

Fallom fucked around with this message at 00:57 on Jan 20, 2020

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Antivehicular posted:

This is immaculate story-reader synergy and I hope it pays off

Honestly, this makes me want to recommend NALM to my dad, except his horror taste runs to the schlocky, so I think most of it wouldn't land. Maybe it just makes me wish I had a dad with better taste?

tell him to read that book about the drug mule who fights worms in an apartment building instead

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



COOL CORN posted:

Two interesting Ballingrud news tidbits:

- Monsterland season 1 (the Hulu adaptation of NALM) wrapped filming on 2/10, so hopefully there's some sort of official announcement soon?
- He's nearing completion on his next book, "The Strange", and it's a "dark Martian fantasy" novel.

Ah, the Ghosts of Mars novelization is a good get

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



I just got around to watching Wounds and it seems to be a fairly straightforward adaptation of The Visible Filth. I recall seeing a lot of complaints that the movie was misleadingly marketed or not what they expected... how so?

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



I liked Wounds better than NALM because at the time I read them I was not remotely in the mood for the dreamy metaphors for the American condition in the latter and totally in the mood for the creepy hell skulls in the former.

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



It's basically just The Tommyknockers and man that is not a good pull

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Bonaventure posted:

my library system doesn't have NALM so i got Wounds instead

lmao, skullpocket

i haven't enjoyed a piece of fiction so much in at least 25 years

Wounds is cool as hell

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Artelier posted:

I finished North American Lake Monsters, which was excellent! Want to ask if Wounds is as, shall we say, despair-inducing and bleak or is it a different flavour of horror? Because NALM is excellent but it was such a heavy read

Wounds is more Clive Barker

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Question about the ending of Carrier Wave:

If the humans left alive to repopulate the earth are the ones who can synthesize their own concepts like justice and such without help, then wouldn’t their offspring be immune to a follow-up of the kind of attack that the four beings launched with the signal? The embodiment of Justice said he wanted to plant a seed for a future harvest, if possible, but the beings seemed to undermine their own ability to repeat the harvest by being so indiscriminate.

Maybe the farming metaphor goes deeper than I thought!

Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Good Citizen posted:

I read the Four as concepts and not truly 'killable', and humanity as eventually hosed, unless the immunity that the survivors had was genetic. Even with proper education, imagine anyone with enough motivation had a nuke that could eliminate humanity just by searching out some old hard drives. Once the cycle kicks off that's pretty much it for humanity. The best possible situation humanity can hope for is that the immunity is genetic and then the survivors can track down anyone who survived through methods like the costco colony and kill them all.

That was an alternative I thought about but I think the immunity must be genetic, because the rage maniacs were said to be base humans without any gifts whatsoever. Since no more gifts are coming and we know humankind made it their offspring must be chill.

On a related note, are there any other books that have the same kind of format of short, related vignettes? The only other example I can think of is World War Z.

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Fallom
Sep 6, 2008



Oh yeah I just think it’s fun to think about. The logic of the world isn’t really the part worth criticizing since the pace is fast enough you don’t really dwell on it.

I finally remembered the book that seemed fairly similar in concept and execution:

The Testimony by James Smythe

quote:

A global thriller presenting an apocalyptic vision of a world on the brink of despair and destruction. What would you do if the world was brought to a standstill? If you heard deafening static followed by the words, ‘My children. Do not be afraid’? Would you turn to God? Subscribe to the conspiracy theories? Or put your faith in science and a rational explanation? The lives of all twenty-six people in this account are affected by the message. Most because they heard it. Some because they didn’t. The Testimony – a gripping story of the world brought to its knees and of its people, confused and afraid.

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