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Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

18th-century stuff is pretty hard to get through, I don't blame you one bit

Daphne du Maurier is an early-to-mid-20th century Gothic author and you might find her works more accessible. Three of her novels - Rebecca, My Cousin Rachel, and Jamaica Inn - were adapted into films, as were her short stories "The Birds" and "Don't Look Now."

Back to the 18th century, Vathek by William Beckford is unusual among Gothics because it's set in Arabia and draws heavily on Orientalist tropes. It's about a Caliph who renounces Islam and commits a series of evil acts to gain supernatural knowledge, which works out about as well as you'd expect. :unsmigghh:

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Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

Anybody play interactive fiction (like Zork and its descendants)? I'm working on Vespers by Jason Devlin again and it's spooooky. You can play it online or download it for free here: http://ifdb.tads.org/viewgame?id=6dj2vguyiagrhvc2

Don't trust Cecilia. Alternately, do trust Cecilia :unsmigghh:

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

Does anybody know any good public domain short stories with women characters? I'm working on a personal project and it's hard for me to Google up this stuff. I've already got E.F. Benson's "How Fear Departed from the Long Gallery" and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper" on my list, but the more stuff I can find the better. Thank you in advance!

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

Franchescanado posted:

NPR finally got off their asses and posted the results for the 100 Best Horror Stories, as voted by readers and "a panel of experts"

I'm not impressed.

Yeah, some of these make a lot of sense, but others....eeeeeeh

E: Thank you Franchescanado and chernobyl kinsman for your suggestions.

Pththya-lyi fucked around with this message at 20:30 on Aug 20, 2018

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

There's a lot of Neo-Lovecraftian writers who are reimagining Lovecraft's universe through a progressive lens - Victor LaValle, Matt Ruff, and Emrys herself have already been brought up, and Caitlin R. Kiernan is another that comes to my mind. There's no denying Lovecraft was racist, but the conceit of a lot of his stories - that the Other you've learned to hate may be like you, or even within you - is a potent idea that marginalized authors can really tap into. Maybe I'm biased, but I think there's a baby in the bigoted, purple-prose bathwater.

Plus there's enough Lovecraft fans going "No, he really wasn't that racist" that we really do need people to push back against that.

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

chernobyl kinsman posted:

god forbid horror writers attempt something innovative instead of rehashing cthulhu for the 7000th time

I will fite u

a foolish pianist posted:

Try Agents of Dreamland first, then maybe Dear Sweet Filthy World, and then go back in time from there if you like them.

Yeah, do this

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

On the one hand, "The Horror at Red Hook," the short story The Ballad of Black Tom is based on and is responding to, gives you context for and a better appreciation of the novella.

On the other hand "Red Hook" is super-racist and incoherently bad, even by the standards of a Lovecraft work. So only read it if you're a completionist or interested in the history of racism in America

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

chernobyl kinsman posted:

Why would you read black Tom without reading the text it is explicitly engaged in dialogue with

Because the text is bad

Here is the only good part, which Lovecraft lifted from the "Magic" entry of the Encyclopedia Brittanica:

quote:

"O friend and companion of night, thou who rejoicest in the baying of dogs and spilt blood, who wanderest in the midst of shades among the tombs, who longest for blood and bringest terror to mortals, Gorgo, Mormo, thousand-faced moon, look favourably on our sacrifices!"

:black101:

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

The ebook of Horrorstor is $1.99 on Amazon today: https://smile.amazon.com/Horrorstor...ords=horrorstor

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

Skyscraper posted:

I mean, I guess this book might sell if they started stocking it in hot topic.

It's doesn't tie in with a media property aimed at teenagers so I doubt they'd be interested

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

I'd kinda be curious to see Ligotti's take on Misery

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

Mel Mudkiper posted:

So I just got done reading Kwaidan which is a book of ancient buddhist ghost stories and it owned

Best one is either "Hoichi the Earless" or "Yuki-Onna," change my mind

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

Mel Mudkiper posted:

Its funny how many of the stories are "I married this hot chick and whoops she's a ghost"

Dudes in folklore are always marrying supernatural women, and always failing to keep the simple precautions that would let them (or force them to) stay

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

grobbo posted:

I downloaded this onto my Kindle and was won over by the mention of crabs with human faces on their shells on the very first page.

The Heikegani, or "Samurai crab:"



And an article busting some myths surrounding the Heikegani:

https://research.nhm.org/pdfs/3729/3729.pdf

Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

If I like the horror protagonist I just feel really bad when they die and/or get eternally tormented. That's fine in small doses, but too much for me to deal with all the time. But if it's someone like Sam Strutt from Ramsey Campbell's "Cold Print," it's really satisfying when they get their just deserts. :unsmigghh:

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Pththya-lyi
Nov 8, 2009

THUNDERDOME LOSER 2020

One of the inspirations was the true story of the Lighthouse Tragedy of 1801, which took place off the west coast of Wales:

"Smalls Lighthouse," Wikipedia posted:

The old lighthouse brought about a change in lighthouse policy in 1801 after a gruesome episode. The two-man team, Thomas Howell and Thomas Griffith, were known to quarrel, so when Griffith died in a freak accident, Howell feared that he might be suspected of murder if he discarded the body into the sea. As the body began to decompose, Howell built a makeshift coffin for the corpse and lashed it to an outside shelf. Stiff winds blew the box apart, though, and the body's arm fell within view of the hut's window and caused the wind to catch it in such a way that it seemed as though it was beckoning. Working alone and with the decaying corpse of his former colleague outside Howell managed to keep the lamp lit. When Howell was finally relieved from the lighthouse the effect the situation had had on him was said to be so extreme that some of his friends did not recognise him. As a result, lighthouse teams were changed to rosters of three men, which continued until the automation of British lighthouses in the 1980s.

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