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ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




this broken hill posted:

i bought some issues of tall trees and shadows and welp i guess horror is dead

Elaborate.

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ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Franchescanado posted:

Are there any good horror books/stories with about people forced into a survival-of-the-fittest/kill-or-be-killed anarchy game?


It's not good at all, but if you're desperate Smooth Worn Stone kicks off a book series about a cave where they kinda sorta do a Battle Royale thing. Trigger warnings for rape though.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Nevill's The Ritual.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Doctor Faustine posted:

How's the book compare to the movie? I thought the movie was pretty solid.

First half better, second part worse.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Now that I'm not on the phone: I loved the first part of The Ritual and was really disappointed in the other half. I thought it was pretty terrifying and tightly written. The movie I liked a lot less, as it did the usual ''bunch of dudes lost in the woods'' cliches that the book didn't rely on as much. So yeah, first part, heaps better than the movie counterpart. The other half though is goofy as heck in the book but was significantly punched up in the movie.

A while back I wrote this about folk horror: https://litreactor.com/columns/five-great-folk-horror-novels

Save you a click, I mention:

"The Great God Pan" by Arthur Machen
"We Will All Go Down Together" by Gemma Files
"The Loney' by Andrew Michael Hurley
"Ritual" by Adam Nevill
"Boy's Life" by Robert McCammon (debatable)

and from the comments, people suggested:
Matthew M. Bartlett's GATEWAYS TO ABOMINATION
Thomas Tryon's Harvest Home
Peter Ackroyd's First Light
T. E. D. Klein's The Ceremonies
Christopher Buehlman's Those Across The River

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




MockingQuantum posted:

They're both horror writers who had a disproportionate influence on horror in the 80s, are kind of consistently overrated, have weirdly dedicated fans for the quality of their writing, and have been coasting on a small handful of good books for most of their careers?



lmao

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




scary ghost dog posted:

yeah he gets props for not giving up, to be sure

In my copy of Bird Box at the end he basically says he had written like 20 novels that were just sitting around until some producer (agent? something?) friend of his was like ''Send them all over.'' The movie rights were bought before the book was picked up I believe.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




King has a bunch of good books and I feel most people forget he ''also wrote that one.''

Here's my list of good ones, up until 2010.

1974 - Carrie
1975 - Salem's Lot
1977 - The Shining
1978 - Night Shift (stories)
1978 - The Stand
1979 - The Dead Zone
1982 - The Dark Tower I: The Gunslinger
1982 - Different Seasons (novellas)
1983 - Christine
1983 - Pet Sematary
1984 - The Talisman (written with Peter Straub)
1985 - Skeleton Crew (stories, including "The Mist")
1986 - It
1987 - Misery
1987 - The Dark Tower II: The Drawing of the Three
1989 - The Dark Half
1990 - Four Past Midnight (stories)
1991 - Needful Things
1991 - The Dark Tower III: The Waste Lands
1993 - Nightmares & Dreamscapes (stories)
1996 - The Green Mile
1996 - Desperation
1998 - Bag of Bones
2002 - From a Buick 8
2002 - Everything's Eventual: 14 Dark Tales
2010 - Full Dark, No Stars

Long Walk is his best one though.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Edmond Dantes posted:


I'm also realising that I read most of his stuff in Spanish and I only read Dark Tower in English, so I'm starting to wonder how much of King's writing affectation/tics got lost in translation and how much of it only came to play at a later date, because for the life of me I can't remember anything even close to "Dad-a-chum? Dum-a-chum? Ded-a-chek? Did-a-chick?" in his earlier stuff.



Don't quote me but I think that Library Policeman had some of that. I think he used it a lot when dealing with like, repressed childhood trauma.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




The editing would have been handy after a while, yes. It, The Stand already could have been cut down a lot and The Stand definitely needed an actual ending. It definitely looks like he's had carte blanche to do whatever the gently caress. Even more so after he ''retired'' I feel, because Duma Key was even more disjointed.

I mean King's early works where small, fairly tightly written novels. Long Walk, Carrie, The Gunslinger, Dead Zone, etc are all like what, sub-300 pages?

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




a foolish pianist posted:

For King, really only The Gunslinger and his short stories are worthwhile. Everything else starts dragging and gets tiresome quickly.

what the gently caress did I just say motherfucker

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Traxis posted:


and the short story collection Lost Signals

I'm in this.

There's a sequel called Lost Films.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Traxis posted:

I really enjoyed Transmission, it was fairly creepy and paced extremely well. Experimental Film was ok but it definitely drags with all of the dry, technical bits about Canadian film history. I'm not a film nerd though so YMMV. The Last Days of Jack Sparks has an interesting premise but it falls apart by the end and most of the author's attempts at humor fall flat.


I'll check it out. What story is yours? My favorite was The Night Wire

The one with the soldiers.

Lost Films might actually be better than Lost Signals imo.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Any good recs for an Alien vibe? Abandoned space stations or ships, etc?

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




a foolish pianist posted:

Universal Harvester is fantastic. It starts out seeming like a horror novel, but then it turns out to be about family and loneliness and grief and lots of other things.

I was disappointed by that book not because it wasn't horror, but because of how it fizzled out at the end.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Esme posted:

If I didnít like North American Lake Monsters because I felt like every story was a lot of buildup with no payoff, will I also dislike The Visible Filth?

I think it's worth a try. I like Lake Monsters myself, but I can see what you mean. Visible Filth is a bit more traditional.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




I believe there won't be any more because they didn't sell well.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




A book I edited years ago is a featured deal on Bookbub and I thought it might be of interest here.
It's a 50's USA themed collection that I would describe as kind of old school in terms of stories. Not very gory or violent but not really new wave of weird either.

https://www.bookbub.com/books/american-nightmare-by-max-booth-iii-and-tim-marquitz?ebook_deal

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Some Laird Barron maybe?

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




I read HEX by Thomas Olde Heuvelt and it wasn't that good. Kinda like a soulless Stephen King, the whole book is basically mapped after Pet Sematary but generally didn't succeed in pulling me in. Some kinda gross parts and slurs also put me off a bit.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Len posted:

I liked the basic thought behind it where this town has a malevolent entity and just stuff upper lips their way around it

That's the part of the blurb that got me to pick it up. Unfortunately I read later that he basically rewrote his book to take place in the US instead of Holland, so that kinda explains why I felt it fell flat.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




I think HEX would have worked better if it was set in the 80s or something, so there's not a literal app that tracks the ghost.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Am I the only one convinced that The Ritual was a novella that he was forced to expand into a novel? It's just two different books smashed into one.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Limited edition hardcovers are the new author mill/vanity publishing. You get a small press author nobody reads and do a limited edition of 200 copies, sell 20 to their friends and family and you already broke even, the rest is profit.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Ornamented Death posted:

You're about fifteen years late with this take.


It's not a take if it's true

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Ornamented Death posted:

Your example would seem to disprove ravenkult's point. Had the system worked as presented, the publisher would have done your husband's book as a LE and had him pressuring everyone you know to buy a copy.

Margins at any level of publishing are razor thin. If you're breaking even after 20 copies of an edition of 200, it's being printed on toilet paper bound with Elmer's glue between two used pizza boxes.

LEs start at 50$ per copy, so even being hyperbolic I'm not too far off.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




lol you think authors get an advance

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




the way to get in touch with Thomas is to go to his fan forum and talk to one of the admins there.

What I'm trying to say is getting in touch with Ligotti is kind of a Ligottian story in itself.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




chernobyl kinsman posted:

have you been in touch with ligotti

A few years ago I wanted to interview him, an admin passed my email along to him

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




chernobyl kinsman posted:

the ruins is, and i am not being hyperbolic, one of the top 3 worst books i have ever read in my life

All I remember is pissing and making GBS threads described in excruciating detail.

Ariza posted:

What other books or authors would y'all recommend that are similar to Adam Cesare? I think I've finished off his ouevre now and I like the shorter, simpler 80s horror movie aesthetic for listening to/reading at night time when I don't really want dense prose or trying to find layers to a story.

Try Max Booth III

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




gonna need one of those tags

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




MockingQuantum posted:

As someone who loves that style of book, I'd say Experimental Film was thoroughly enjoyable. Not a must-read horror novel in general, but a lot of fun if you're looking for that sort of "found footage" horror done pretty well as a book.

The Grin of the Dark by Ramsey Campbell might qualify, I haven't read it myself though.

The Last Days of Jack Sparks kind of fits, as does The Cipher. The Cipher doesn't strictly speaking fit the requirement exactly but it definitely does in spirit.

As a non-recommendation, avoid Found Audio by NJ Campbell. It ostensibly fits the whole "found audio tapes" horror trope but it's a pretty bad book that really squanders the premise, and is just generally poorly written.

I'm an absolute sucker for this style of horror, and love Night Film and Universal Harvester, despite them both, especially the latter, not really being traditional horror. Hell, Universal Harvester really got shortchanged by even being marketed as horror, I think half of what makes the book so good is how it subverts the expectation that it's going to be a horror novel, but that said it has one of the most interesting/unsettling moments in any book I've read, though that may be more attributed to me and how I read than the book.

edit: for bonus points, I think Lost Signals had a story in it by a goon, though it's entirely possible I'm misremembering that, and no longer remember who it would be anyway.

It's a-me!

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Some horror writer that just put a book out recently. Was DMing women (reviewers, other writers) and telling them how horny he is. Then he made some fake screenshots and sent them to her friends and some publisher claiming she was the harasser, but they were laughable and everyone told him to gently caress off. Now he's nuked all his social media.

I gotta say though I'm not sure why people are pulling books from his wife's company. I guess they feel that he might be involved with the operation? Still it's not her fault her huusband's a creep.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




So the last few GBS ghost threads haven't really worked out and generally sucked. But would a PYF creepypasta (*shudder*) thread be interesting? I like to delve into r/nosleep once a year and pick out some decent, more subtle than usual stories, if there's interest I can make a thread.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




I'm trawling r/nosleep but it feels like the direction the sub has taken plus a new influx of wannabe fiction writers had made stories a whole lot worse. Most of the titles sound like Buzzfeed articles (I found an old book and you won't believe what happened next!) and whenever a story gets mildly popular it spawns 500 copycats.

Anyway I'm compiling a few to post but it's mostly middling stuff.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Let me know what you think of Darkhorse Actual.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




That's cool, he's accepting stories for a new anthology now called Lost Contact that's kinda similar.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




StrixNebulosa posted:

in this one.

I have bad news, friend.

ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Untrustable posted:

Modern horror anthologies? Can't go wrong with Lost Films and Lost Signals, both edited by Max Booth III and Ellen Datlow.

Films is horror revolving around lost films, haunted tv shows, gruesome film festivals, etc.

Signals deals with audio horror. Both are excellent.

Ellen Datlow didn't edit those, Lori Michelle did with Max.

And good news, there's gonna be a 3rd, titled Lost Contact.

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ravenkult
Feb 3, 2011




Untrustable posted:

Oops. Datlow just seems to be everywhere. My bad. Yes, I submitted a story for Lost Contact.

I think Datlow has one that's similar, something about Hollywood and movies? It's called Final Cut.

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