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alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




i just read "The Troop" and quite enjoyed it. ghastly body horror, s where the writing was most evocative. is Cutter's other novel "The Deep" worth a go?

also i read and quite enjoyed Fritz Leiber's "Our Lady Of Darkness", even if the character seemed kind of like Frasier Crane. the paranormal events in it are very compelling and unnerving, especially everything to do on the hilltop.

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alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




FastestGunAlive posted:

Looking for a short story collection to read through for spooky month. Loved the Weird but not necessarily looking for weird-specific. I’m not into splatter/torture type stuff. Last year I read 999: New Stories of Horror and it was very hit and miss.

just finished "The Inhabitant Of The Lake and Less Welcome Tenants" by Ramsey Campbell and its very enjoyable - but pretty meat and potatos weird Cthulhuverse fiction

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




Owlkill posted:

I'd recommend "Dark Companions" by Campbell - seems to mostly stick to regular supernatural rather than Cthulhuverse.

I'm currently reading "Demons by Daylight: Supernatural Fictions", which is somewhat inaccurately titled given that at least two of the stories have regular non-spooky humans as the source of the horror.

I hear a lot about Campbell being a writer of Mythos fiction but somehow I seem to have avoided that in what I've read of him so far, though I've only got those two collections. He's very good at evoking a particularly British dinginess that somehow really adds to to the creeping grimness, I find. And some good folk horror themes too.

yeah i quite like him. all of the mythos stuff he wrote i think when he was quite young, and i'm glad he got away from it a bit. his dirty, diabolic and grimey britain is way more fun. i love the settings in The Nameless, all these odd derelicts in the middle of dense areas, hidden in plain sight

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




i finished Nick Cutter's The Deep the other day and enjoyed it immensely.

it was less immediately satisfying than The Troop, but it's unrelenting in piling on mental pressure onto the few characters working their way through it. like, from start to finish, the characters have only a very, very slim chance that they're not completely boned. it all makes it a pretty crushing read.

i've read a few online reviews being like "i wish this book was about the 'Gets, it's so interesting". but i'm glad it doesn't: it helps build up Cutter's universe as cruel beyond any measure we have of cruelty. and it helps establish a mood where Luke (the main character) is already second-guessing their mental state before they're dropped underwater.

the dream-pools, the recurring horrifying bug imagery, the graphic and unsettling body horror - they're all great. the absolutely bleak hole he paints his characters into: also great. the chapter on the dog's death hit me in the same place the sea turtle scene from The Troop did. really rough stuff.


anyway i guess i am all-in for whatever other stuff he writes. time to get Little Heaven on my christmas wishlist

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




The Polish Pirate posted:

Currently reading The Troop, but I'm too early into it to know how good it is yet.

its jolly good fun!

i just finished koji suzuki's RING and enjoyed it a lot! the first japanese horror novel ive read that hasnt been a comic. are Spiral and Loop worth checking out? also hit me up with other good japanese horror stories

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




fauna posted:

dammit i believe in the power of love

dad has always gifted me books so i just want to return the favour :( whenever my brother and i went to his house for summer holidays, he would give me a "christmas" present of a retired library book from the library where he worked, and would encourage me to read it as quickly as possible so he could take it back and then give it as a "christmas" present to my brother. that's how i developed my incredible speed-reading skills, trying to read while dad hovered around the door going "are you done yet? are you done yet? are you done yet??" taught me to churn through a medium-length novel in like an hour

you developed a good skill but an even better one might have been learning to say "gently caress off dad"

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




gey muckle mowser posted:

what (if any) Stephen King novels from the past 10-15 years are worth reading? Last of his I read was Under the Dome.

seconding Revival, i think its probably one of his best all-up. i liked it a lot

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




anilEhilated posted:

Tangentially related to the Klein talk - where would you folks recommend starting with Ramsey Campbell?

the first novel of his I read was Ancient Images and it hooked in, completely. gets a bit repetitive but I loved it. Midnight Sun is regarded as one of his best, and i like it a lot but dont actually find it that scary. i also really liked The Nameless

also I've got a collection of his SEXY horror stories and there are some all time great photoshop images in it. I will post some when i get access to the comp

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




Fallom posted:

I just got around to watching Wounds and it seems to be a fairly straightforward adaptation of The Visible Filth. I recall seeing a lot of complaints that the movie was misleadingly marketed or not what they expected... how so?

some of the published reviews of it read that armie hammer plays his character like nothing more than a hollow shell - and that it was mostly a pretty meandering character drama. i loved it myself, because it is a faithful adaptation and his character is meant to be an absolute nothing. but i dunno how it was marketed really

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




Xiahou Dun posted:


Also I'm like halfway through The Deep by Nick Cutter and it's profoundly enh? I got it cause it was at the library and The Troop was on reserve. The ideas are pretty okay, but a lot of the writing is out-right amateur hour stuff. Does he get better?

I ended up liking The Deep more than The Troop for how loving weird it gets and how sort of bombastic the ending is, but it might not be for everyone. The Troop is probably the better, leaner book though

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




escape artist posted:

gently caress. I've been saving the Butcher's Table because it's the last published Ballingrud I haven't read.

I guess it's time.

indulge as soon as possible. it's by far my favourite of all his stories

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




Xiahou Dun posted:

How do people feel about Ramsey Campbell?

I’m halfway through Thirteen Days By Sunset Beach and it seems okay? Worried as always cause horror stories die in the last part, but the set up is okay.

I don’t think the Greek is right but I’d basically have to ask a friend to read the whole book.

I like Campbell a lot. the drearier and more run-down his vision of england is the better too. my favorites of his are Ancient Images, The Nameless, Midnight Sun and the collections of his young Lovecraft mythos stuff.

that said, his stuff does tend to deflate a bit at the end. I don't think quite as spectacularly as King but it feels like a whimper instead of a bang a lot of the time

also the films of his books are invariably awful haha

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




any cool recommendations for good unnerving alien fiction?

i've read the Southern Reach trilogy and enjoyed it a lot; it sort of unsettled, rather than outright provoked, mostly. i am keen for anything though. subtle, extremely out there and weird - the more the better.

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




Forgall posted:

Blindsight?

cool thankyou!!

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




thanks - ship of fools added to the list. I dunno what prompted it but I've been craving alien stuff recently and X files reruns only go so far

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




so maybe forum not dead and under new ownership instead?

but if it goes i will miss the horror thread most of all. so many good recommendations. so little gatekeeping. just a full-on embrace of all the gold - and trash - that spookadoodles have to offer

my mother in law watched Hereditary yesterday afternoon with my partner. when it was finished she said "I'll do that to you when I'm gone!"

pretty dark mum

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




Bilirubin posted:

disappointed its not a sex shop

there's an infamous sex shop in my city called Lovecraft and it looks exactly like the sort of dive where you'd find a dude with a weird jaw, a strange odour and gills on his neck

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




I read Wounds first and I think I like it more. the blend of fantasy stuff surprised me but man The Butchers Table stuck with me hugely.

sucks to hear the narrator for Skullpocket was bad. I really liked the grim little world it built

alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




Rolo posted:

Sounds like the general consensus is I should get Wounds if I liked most of NALM?

it's different but absolutely.

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alf_pogs
Feb 15, 2012




Kestral posted:

Where should I start with Ramsey Campbell? Heard a description of his work recently and was instantly sold, but it didn't include a "start here with Campbell" recommendation.

i started with Ancient Images and then Midnight Sun and The Nameless. those are all pretty good stuff I think? his short stories are fun too - the Cthulhu mythos collection of his "The Inhabitant of the Lake and less welcome tenants" is a good one

also, an artist collaborator of Ramsey's posted heaps of his teenage sketchbook doodles. really great horror imagery and ideas hahaha

https://jkpotter.com/the-art-of-ramsey-campbell/

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