Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


I thought the ending to The Fisherman was effective.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


There's some really bad stephen king imo.

Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


chernobyl kinsman posted:

It is eleven thousand pages long and the only part of it anyone ever talks about is the preteen gangbang. it's the literary equivalent of the "you gently caress one horse" joke

People talk about the bullies jacking each other off too.

Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


sicDaniel posted:

Just finished Adam Neville's Last Days, I also read The Ritual a month ago. My thoughts: The Ritual is really good, a bit better than the movie. I know that the second half is really hit or miss for people who read it. I liked it because it was so strange and unexpected and it's cool that Neville decided to go this route instead of doing the more obvious and cliche conclusion, which the film does. What I didn't like so much was how Neville pretty much incapacitates his protagonist for the entire second half, so he's just lying there most of the time listening to his kidnappers expository monologue for dozens and dozens of pages without end.

Now, Last Days is difficult. I am a huge sucker for found footage films so the approach in this novel is right up my alley, and the first half of the novel is among the best stuff I've read this year. But here Neville forgot to include something interesting for the second half (felt like he ran out of ideas) which imo was really bad. Like in The Ritul, but worse. The entire last third of the book is Kyle being very scared and/or confused while the scholar in Antwerpen and then Max absolutely drown him in expository monologue about the real real truth of the cult, which was sadly underdeveloped being presented in this way, and then the last 50 pages it's suddenly Aliens.

I really enjoyed the Last Days but I get what you mean.
Last Days felt like He had a couple good ideas for 'set pieces' and then had to come up with a way to end it. The problem for me is that the set pieces basically require you to know nothing about what's going on. And so he can't reveal the backstory slowly and you end up with giant exposition dumps. I liked the aliens ending but it feels like it comes out of another draft and he really wanted to keep it (including a brand new character that dies shortly after).

Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


I've been reading john ajvide lindqvist's "locations" trilogy. It has lots of weirdness but isn't quite what you are looking for. The 3rd isn't in english and I feel like it makes more sense to start with the second one tbh.

edit: actually book 1 (i am behind you) is kind of what you are looking for. I still think it flows better if you read the second book first though.

Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


I read The Twisted Ones by T Kingfisher recently and enjoyed it.

Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


Conrad_Birdie posted:

From what I understand, the Church of Latter Day Saints

that actually explains a lot

I just purchased some Ligotti. Should be interesting reading in my quarantine cave.

Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


Death Sentences by Chiaki Kawamata influenced The Ring and other similar stuff. Not sure it's purely horror though.

Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


Just finished The Hollow Places by Ursula Vernon/T Kingfisher. I enjoyed it quite a bit though it's similar to her previous The Twisted Ones. The Twisted Ones sprung out of Machen's The White People and this comes out of Algernon Blackwood's The Willows.
A woman takes care of her uncle's crazy homemade museum and discovers a portal to a....place.

It's more of a mood piece than anything and the narrator may not be for everyone. But it's a quick, run read.

Spite fucked around with this message at 03:51 on Dec 31, 2020

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

Spite
Jul 27, 2001

Small chance of that...


MockingQuantum posted:

I'm tempted to read it because I love Blackwood, but I did not like The Twisted Ones at all. It felt like she wanted to write a love letter to this deeply weird, fascinating early horror story but did it in the most bland, straightforward way (with, imo, a very grating main character). It felt like a book with a lot of potential, but it just never got close to paying any of it off.

Does The Hollow Places have the same problems? I think a lot of my issues might boil down to Kingfisher/Vernon's writing style in general. This may be selling her short, but The Twisted Ones read, to me, like she didn't quite succeed in making the jump from writing kids/YA books. It just reads as very shallow.

Yup you probably won't like it then. The main character is effectively the same person in both. You can tell they were written by someone who spends too much time on the internet and has appropriated "quirky" as their personality.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply