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nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


I started lurking in this thread a few weeks ago, and it convinced me to read Wounds by Nathan Ballingrud. All I can say is it reminded me of how I felt after reading Clive Barker's Books of Blood for the first time as a teenager in the late 80's. The Butcher's Table is one of the best novellas I have ever read in my life. This was 100% my cup of tea. I am moving on now to his other collection, but I doubt it could touch what I just read.

Also he is doing a reading at a book store that is 1.5 hours away from me this Halloween (he is from Asheville, NC). So tempted.

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nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Len posted:

How is Salem's Lot?

My favorite King, but not his best. It was just one of the first books I read at a way too young of a age, and I really loved the small town has its secrets vibe of it. It is the one book I wish King would have written a true prequel to (yes I read the short stories related to Lot, but Iím talking about a Hubieís era in the Lot).

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Pistol_Pete posted:

Speaking of beautifully written, I'm on T.E.D. Klein's The Ceremonies at the moment. You can tell the dude spent years writing this because it's so perfectly polished. Trouble is, I've come to really like the four main characters in the book (Ok, not the college-lecturer protagonist so much, 'cos he's a bit of an rear end in a top hat tbh) and I'm getting to the point of the book where bad stuff is going to start happening to them, rather than the walk-on characters. I kind of want to sneak a look at the end, to see who gets to survive but then that would spoil the book.

I read this book back in the late 80's, and recently as last year. I agree about the four main characters. Each are extremely likable in their own way, and you hope for the best for all of them. Unfortunately I felt the ending was really rushed and sort of anti-climactic (that said I will never forget the last line of the book). I remember hearing that Klein suffered from extreme writer's block, and it took him a long time to write The Ceremonies. While this really benefited most of the book, I always felt he got fed up with it taking so long and forced the last 3rd of the book. Still a really good book, and shame we didn't get more from Klein.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


I read The Troop by Cutter. I thought it had a strong start, but i didnít like it once if I finished. Not bad, just pretty average. I remember finding the whole thing just ridiculous. So I still havenít read anything else from him after that disappointment (Little Heaven does interest me some).

That said I might be in the minority (I also find Paul Tremblay overrated). I would say go read The Ruins by Scott Smith instead.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Rolo posted:

Finally got around to finishing Hill House. I liked it! Thanks for the recommendations, thread.

So if that and The Shining are my favorite spooky books, whatís next? My favorite aspect of a horror is the setting, specifically pretty, secluded places.

Also I would recommend Salemís Lot. Not for the vampires, but for the influence of Hill House on the stories about the Marsten House. That said I consider Hill House the peak of haunted house literature, so its all downhill from here.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Big Mad Drongo posted:

I enjoyed A Collapse of Horses by Brian Evenson. I'm too stupid to say whether it's properly literary and/or easily Googleable, but if nothing else it's a cut above most horror schlock.

I really enjoyed it, and I have been tempted to try one of his novels like Last Days.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


COOL CORN posted:

Now that I'm done with Wounds, I would give anything for a Butcher's Table movie


My exact same thought. I would love just to be in the room for the pitch.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


I enjoyed Summer of Night (I liked it more than Kingís IT) and the Hyperion Cantos. Also I might be one of two people who sort of liked Drood. That said Obama getting elected broke him, and we saw what a true garbage person he truly is. I havenít read anything yet Simmons in almost 10 years, and I doubt if I will again. Just too uneven. Also I agree about The Terror. I would say 75% enjoyable until it sunk hard the last 25.%.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


escape artist posted:

I always hear Cows by Matthew Stokoe is the grossest book. I haven't checked it out because I'm not into that genre. Couldn't get through an Edward Lee.

Cows is the truly the grossest book I have ever read. Maybe I read the more mainstream Edward Lee books, but I don't find it anywhere close to how insane Cows was. Also read Stokoe's High Life, but I don't remember much about.

What about The Wasp Factory? It's been like 15 years since I read it, but I remember it begin intense also.

remigious posted:

There are parts of American Psycho that are extremely gnarly, a ton of gorey horrific stuff was not in the movie. Glamorama also has some intense torture stuff. Itís weird, when I was younger my motto was basically the gorier the better, but in my advancing age Iím a huge wuss.

Glamorama was also torture to finish (I am not sure how I feel about it overall). I felt like it just droned on and on. I say this as someone who enjoyed a few of Ellis' works.

Fake edit: Roger Avary was going to make Glamorama into a film? I thought he did ok with The Rules of Attraction, and the whole Victor Ward European sequence was amazing. Reading Wiki, that sequence was an actual a movie that was suppose to bridge The Rules of Attraction with Galmorama. It has only been shown at private screenings due to the the film being ethically questionable.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Lawrence Wright beat him by almost 3 months with his book End of October. Wright is a great non-fiction writer (Going Clear and The Looming Tower are his most famous works), but a pretty average fiction writer. The best parts of End Of October are when he recounts the histories of viruses, but the fiction part of the book was a struggle for me.

What is truly amazing about End of October is how he was spot on with Trumpís (president is nameless in the book but you know) response (lack of) and stupidity since this book was finished last year.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


This has to be one of the most ridiculous lines I have read in awhile, ďDanzig filled the car, setting his mind at ease, the aural equivalent of a warm security blanketĒ.

Oh that line is from Devilís Creek. It is a fun read, but itís not that good. 300+ pages into it and the writer has made no effort to make you care about a single character (zero development). Also he wasted an opportunity with making town and its residents into interesting characters. At times I thought he was trying for a Salemís Lot vibe but he missed the mark. The book just pushes the plot forward at its own peril.

nate fisher fucked around with this message at 02:56 on Jul 25, 2020

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Fire Safety Doug posted:

Personally I prefer Wounds, I just love Ballingrudís whole Hell mythos. The Butcherís Table didnít do it for you at all?

Me too. The Butcherís Table is the best thing I have read in years. As I said before the whole collection reminded me of how I felt when I read Barkerís Books of Blood the first time back in the 80ís.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Back in 1990 I wrote a poem for an assignment in high school that was me combining (ripping off) Pig Blood Blues with Scapegoats. It made no sense, but I thought I was being deep like only a 17 year old can. It ended up with me have a conference with my guidance counselor and the teacher who assigned it to make sure I was ok in the head. I donít have a point telling that story except The Books of Blood opened up my young mind in so many ways. Love those volumes.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


MockingQuantum posted:

It's been a cheap ebook for years now, if you're open to reading it that way. It's been out of print for ages otherwise, and you'd have to be extremely lucky to find an affordable hard copy at this point, I think.

sephiRoth IRA posted:

That's good to know, thank you. I knew it was out of print, but have been looking for it as a physical copy in any format. Maybe I'll check out the ebook instead.

Actually The Cipher was re-released in September last year. You can pick it up for $17.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1946154334?tag=meerkatpress-20

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


I liked Visible Filth (still it might be the low point in the collection), but The Butcherís Table is a masterpiece in novella form.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


R.L. Stine posted:

I'm doing research for a project involving Tennessee (specifically the southeast border) and I'm looking for some creepy materials on rural southern Appalachia. Works by people native to the area would be a huge plus. Anything worth checking out? The exact location is kinda important, the border of the Tennessee Valley and the Blue Ridge Mountains is fairly significant to the work I'm doing and contains a lot of natural diversity. Really though, anything Appalachian is a thumbs up, fiction or otherwise. Classic ghost stories, monster stuff, hillbilly horror, all good good good.

Also Ballingrud will never top Lake Monsters. It's his Teatro Grottesco.

That is my home area. My family is from the mountains of WNC and I grew up mostly in East TN (Johnson City/Jonesborough area). Are you interested in non-supernatural stuff also? I assume you know about Murderous Mary (the elephant) and her hanging in Erwin. Two recent true horrifying stories are the Lillelid murders back in the 90's (family murdered by teenagers at a rest area on the way back to Knoxville from JC), and one of the sickest true accounts I have ever read in my life (I want to bleach my mind of it) is the Christian and Newsome murders in Knoxville. Also there is an insane story from Mountain City, TN about a girl who catfished (as a CIA agent) her mom and dad to brutally kill a couple she was jealous over.

There is tons of supernatural stuff from the area going back to Cherokee of course. The bald tops in the Roan Mountain area have several explanations of the supernatural kind (Cherokee said their God made them bald to serve as lookout for a monster bird that would carry off kids). Also in that area is the site of the Cloudland Hotel (it closed down in the early 1900's) and stories of ghost singing. Not far from there is the famous Brown Mountain Lights at Wiseman's View. I have actually seen them twice (it is worth a visit and I would go in the fall) and they even did an X-Files episode about them. In the JC area I would look into the story of Al Capone having a headquarters there (while I heard this story since I was young, no one can prove or disprove it). JC also has the Swingle Hospital story ( I had to google the name, cause I couldn't remember) which is typical word of mouth stuff.

Of course the Great Smoky Mountains has tons of the stories, and I would look into Jonesborough, TN, Boone, NC, and Hot Spring, NC areas also. I feel like I have told you nothing you don't already know. One possible suggestion is there is a writer named Michael Hardy in Avery County, NC. He wrote for the local paper and has several published books about the history of the area. He knows a lot about that area and he might be worth reaching out to. When the house my grandfather built in Crossnore, NC brunt down (the house was on National Register of Historic Places) I reached out to him and he was pretty helpful in getting me some information.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


I was disappointed in the Elementals. Not that it was bad, it was more of a case I hyped the book up in my mind and it never delivered on that level to me. I know I am in the minority here, but I do wonder if I need to give the author another try.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


I really liked I Am Legend, and I think it is important read given its influence on a Romero and NOTLD. I read Hell House too, and I found it decent

Edit: also confused if you mean him or his son?

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Read Simmonsí Summer of Night instead.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Also their Book of Dead release (it is a collection of other writerís stories) might be the best zombie fiction in book form of all time.

nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Is that the Siddonsí book (the title has been used a lot)?

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nate fisher
Mar 3, 2004

We've Got To Go Back


Nope, but after reading a description of the what the book is about it became an instant preorder.

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