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Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Can y'all help me with a recommendation?

I would like to find another occult (or similar) book like Adam Nevill's Last Days. I enjoyed it but wanted more of a payoff, I guess. Lots of beating around the bush. I was thinking of reading The Hellbound Heart but idk. Has Stephen King written anything like a full-length Gramma?

E: ah poo poo if I'd just read the last few posts I'd have seen Devil's Creek. That looks good

Fitzy Fitz fucked around with this message at 21:22 on Jul 7, 2020

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Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






I'm 90% through Devil's Creek and I'm also not very impressed, but I'm going to finish it.

I honestly think the premise is really good, probably because it's something I thought about doing myself 15 years ago. Cosmic horror in the southern Appalachians. Great idea.

But yeah he just skipped all the character development. There's no tension at all. And the central elements that make it such an interesting premise are not really developed well.

What I do think it does well is capture the nostalgic return by the protagonist to his stagnant childhood hometown. That felt very authentic to me and I'm disappointed that the rest of the book didn't capture that feeling.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Lester Shy posted:

https://twitter.com/NBallingrud/status/1291834740182528000

He says later in the thread that four of the episodes are based on stories from NALM, the other four are original stories by the show's writing staff.

I started reading NALM today and it's very good.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Rolo posted:

I’m excited to see how they do the first story with the waitress in live action.

Yeah part of that I'm sure could be really cool visually, but I hope they do the characters and setting justice. These feel kind of like Murakami stories set in the Southeast.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Huh, I assumed everyone liked the first one best. I enjoyed all three. There are some more fun reveals but they never get bogged down in explanation, which I appreciated.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Idle Amalgam posted:

Mission accomplished then. I shouldn't have led in with that as a detractor. That's definitely personal on my part. All in all, the imagery and ideas were excellent. I did enjoy the story. Just not the direction some of the tropes took.

Looking for more horror in the south, to be honest... feels like home.

Nathan Ballingrud's work is very southern, but I assume everyone's read that by now. I was recently disappointed by both Keisling's Devil's Creek and DeMeester's Beneath. The former actually nailed the setting, at least.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






a foolish pianist posted:

EDIT: It's definitely more supernatural and less grounded, but read Ballingrud's Wounds collection. It's just a relentlessly great romp through some literal hells.

Everyone praises "Skullpocket" and "The Visible Filth," but "The Butcher's Table" was so loving cool. I want more stories like that.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Yeah I'm probably wrong about that. I just really liked it and didn't expect it at all.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






R.L. Stine posted:

I'm doing research for a project involving Tennessee (specifically the southeast border) and I'm looking for some creepy materials on rural southern Appalachia. Works by people native to the area would be a huge plus. Anything worth checking out? The exact location is kinda important, the border of the Tennessee Valley and the Blue Ridge Mountains is fairly significant to the work I'm doing and contains a lot of natural diversity. Really though, anything Appalachian is a thumbs up, fiction or otherwise. Classic ghost stories, monster stuff, hillbilly horror, all good good good.

Also Ballingrud will never top Lake Monsters. It's his Teatro Grottesco.

Please be writing a haunted account at Lake Winnepesaukah. Or about this thing: https://goo.gl/maps/2Tpo9BWWrSPuhuqK9

I grew up on the GA/TN border outside the Cohuttas and wrote my history capstone about Cherokee history in the region, so I feel like I should have something helpful to add here, but nothing is coming to mind. Maybe check out Foxfire.org. New Echota's library has a lot of good material on Cherokee history (or at least they did ten years ago when I was doing research). The stone structure on Fort Mountain is spooky, but that's Georgia again.

spookiest plant: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monotropa_uniflora

Fitzy Fitz fucked around with this message at 15:58 on Mar 17, 2021

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






fez_machine posted:

Have you read The Weird anthology by the Vandermeers? That's usually a good place to find this type of stuff.

Just got this in the mail and am excited to get started.

Also, I just finished the first Books of Blood anthology. In the Hills, the Cities!

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






MockingQuantum posted:

Like "In the Hills, the Cities" is so loving weird and gruesome, but knows it and revels in it in a way I really enjoy.

I read this the other day. It was so strange, like seeing a new color that I had no preconception of.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






Paddyo posted:

I've been brainstorming on this myself after getting sucked into McDowell. In my mind one of the things that sets him apart from other authors in the genre is the way the setting plays such a huge part in his stories. The climate, culture, economy, and history of the deep South provide so much context to his characters and plots, and adds a ton of nuance that creates this awesome atmosphere.

The only other horror author who I can really think of who regularly uses the setting in a similar way is Stephan King.

I haven't gotten to Blackwater yet, so maybe I'm wrong about how it's written, but have y'all check out some classic southern gothic lit? It's basically what you're describing, minus the supernatural.

Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






I'm about halfway through Carrier Wave and it's mostly just made me feel sad

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Fitzy Fitz
May 14, 2005






House of Leaves dealt with loss in a way that meant a lot to me

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