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favorite math?
addition
subtraction
multiplication
division
I use the term "maths" like some imbecile
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Dogmeat
Jun 20, 2003


Woof!



Bread Liar

buglord posted:

I remember having to do timed tests where we had to know all our values up to 12x12. Its weird how useful that is to this day. We had to learn it to a math themed country music song.

they still do this too, a quick glance at the lattice method shows you itís a way to multiply larger numbers, but you still need to know your times tables through 9.

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Dogmeat
Jun 20, 2003


Woof!



Bread Liar

Cubone posted:

I feel like I've seen some weird poo poo where they were like
what's 5 x 8?
well, think of it this way,: 5 8's is a lot like 5 10's, which is 50, and 10 minus 8 is 2, and 2 times 5 is 10, and 50 minus 10 is 40
so 40!

and some facebook dad was like WHAT. WHAT THE gently caress? WHAT.

yeah that's a great example of why it's bad to just teach the method without any understanding. It's really useful but some guys who I suppose only learned long form can't handle a little subtraction in a multiplication problem or something.

Dogmeat
Jun 20, 2003


Woof!



Bread Liar

Cubone posted:

didn't they try a new math between New Math and Common Core?

I'm pretty sure there was an episode of the cosby show where one of the kids was doing math in base 12, and bill cosby was like humpty-dooooo this is all a bit much for me

New Math was a curriculum which is the day to day how to teach it kind of thing, and Common Core is an attempt at creating a federal standard of when kids should know what. It doesn't mean you're getting good textbooks from the University of Chicago, kids in the south are still getting weird Texas textbooks so all the same your results may vary.

Cubone posted:

right I just meant I'm not sure they still memorize the times tables

Should be done by grade 3, according to common core. Though in my experience they kids are done with it before Christmas, most of them probably before Halloween. I mean don't forget you gotta know your times tables before you can even do the long form method.

Dogmeat
Jun 20, 2003


Woof!



Bread Liar

i picked multiply because it sorta also means sex

Dogmeat
Jun 20, 2003


Woof!



Bread Liar

The White Dragon posted:

i take issue with common core because it's riddled with extraneous corpo language bullshit. it doesn't carry over to, or even teach, established terminology so there's gonna be this huge language divide between people who call it a Divisor and people who call it a Cooperative Deconstruction Informer

is there a smilie that is like but instead it's a minion? because if there is someone should quote your post and use the minion smilie that makes it look like it's a minion that is saying your post

Dogmeat
Jun 20, 2003


Woof!



Bread Liar

My high school had one calc teacher and she was crazy and really old and hated kids and if you expected to learn calculus, well, good luck because you were essentially on your own with a textbook. She was the kind of teacher that expected us to read the chapter, answer every problem at the end of the chapter, and she'd drone out the teachers edition answers the next day, and that was the limit of her responsibility. I mean seriously she's the calculus teacher and she hasn't even done the math to realize she would make more money being retired, and she wouldn't have to put up with the kids she took every opportunity to complain about, and she wouldn't have to go to work, but she kept at it and wouldn't let anyone else teach Calc because she'd been there the longest so she had seniority. Plenty of kids can hack it, but I expect only the ones with a natural propensity for math, so the administration didn't seem to think it was an issue when I brought it up as I dropped the class.

I ended up taking trig at a community college instead and the teacher was really laid back and stressed the fundamentals and didn't really care about homework so long as you made a token effort. He would write tests that would seem really intimidating at first but were essentially holding your hand through the current lesson's themes and operations, he just had that knack some do that makes math more like a story: with a natural exposition>rising action>climax>falling action>resolution to his problems. Not like super flowery word problems, but in how you attacked the actual math. If there was a complicated formula you needed to use, he'd incorporate it in a different problem somewhere in the test so you could refer back to it, he's not leaving land mines that punish you for not having a computer like precision for random formula only a handful of specialists in limited fields even use regularly, but he still makes sure you'll know how to apply it properly. It felt like magic, like he was some kind of math wizard who was more interested in students doing and understanding math, rather than just babysitting kids while their parents are at work and hopes and prayering your way into an educated work force.

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Dogmeat
Jun 20, 2003


Woof!



Bread Liar

EorayMel posted:

Do you remember any of the story techniques he used? This sounds like a super interesting method.

It was ages and ages ago and I don't remember any trig, but I got a decent grade at the time so I'll try. Part of it was that he made the lesson the story. You start off with the basic functions you're going to need and then it starts into some of the applications, and then you get to just this beautiful mess of a problem and you're like holy gently caress what the hell am I supposed to do with this thing? But then you just start poking at it the way you did the previous problems and it starts unfolding and you're like: cool, ok. This is how and why I needed to know the stuff I learned. Then the problems get into why you want to go to all this bother and by then the hard part's over so it's kinda neat and fun and, like, why we do math I guess.

Another part was that he didn't obfuscate the math behind how many more baseball cards some kid has or what color which train is. So like problem 5 is: Johnny knows he needs to do X Y Z to get N, and if he knows N he can do A and B, so if N is 5 what is A and B? But then a different problem might be asking how the hell do I solve N? And you're like poo poo was it X Y Z or Y Z X or AB? But then you remember problem 5 mentioned it, and it says do X Y Z, so that's what you do. Like he baked a set of notes into the test, it really takes away a lot of the anxiety and makes math feel a lot less rote and more like gathering data and applying it to get results you want.

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