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Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on


All the Gamers Nexus stuff becomes "collectible", and new stuff sells because people want the new stuff. It's not like no one has ever re-branded before while having things with their old logo on them. Besides, it's all generic online store crap that could be made with a different name inside of a week.

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Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

60 bucks for a hoodie. 30 bucks for an insulated water bottle. 10 bucks for a lanyard.

I would easily bet you can take the 0 off each of those, and that would be the entire cost (design, manufacture, shipping) of each item.

Online merchandise is a huge profit, so the more items you can get people to buy, the more money you make.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Lambert posted:

Is "fuel stabilizer" actually a thing that's useful? Sounds like a scam product.

Generally the best use for it is when you are storing things that can't easily be drained (or one is lazy) over a long period of time. So a push or trim mower over the winter, or a snow blower and snowmobile over the summer. And yes, a vehicle going into storage.

What K8.0 said is so true. I had to have an old garden tractor's carb re-built twice because it was only used as a backup, and the ethanol just clogged the thing up. He told us that in small engines with a carburetor to find gas with no ethanol in it. There was actually one gas station near me that carried it, though the price (at the time) was about a dollar more per gallon.

In the case of Linus, it won't help, but probably won't really hurt either. Modern engines are made for 10% ethanol gas. The thing would have to sit for literal months, with no movement (as just driving it once a week will stir the gas tank and help "freshen" the gas) in order for the gas to start to go bad. And even if it sat for years it would still run, might not like it, but it would.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Mr.Radar posted:

Probably a bit of that and a bit of asking for a bit too much stuff recently. I remember a different storage server video he did a few months ago where he asked Seagate for a bunch of drives, they sent him drives rated for at most 5 per chassis, then he told them it was for a huge NAS and they sent him drives rated for like 12 per chassis and he had to go back to them again to clarify he was putting all like 40 drives he was asking them for into the same chassis before they sent him drives certified for that type of duty. For some reason Seagate didn't ask him to send the other drives back (that's almost certainly where the initial Ironwolf drives he was going to use in this video came from) but I got the impression from the video that Seagate was done with sending him drives for a while.

He did a passing update on the state of all those drives he got in a few videos he did after that build. Basically Seagate said he could keep them, but he had to use them in a project/projects, otherwise he had to return them. If I remember right he had a deadline too.

My guess as to why they re-used that old server is that he's done a few new storage setups recently, and they didn't want to send him a new rack-mount server. I believe the stuff he has been getting is essentially one-off's and/or pre-production stuff, so once he runs through that, then he has to pay.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Combat Pretzel posted:

I'm just watching some AIO cooled graphics card video of him, because of reasons unknown to me, and probably due to earlier talk, I'm noticing some newish flab going on.

He's battled weight problems all his life, which he's talked about. He mentioned not being able to get to a gym due to covid, and the blah's that have come with the lockdowns (not negative, more the "oh god I'm bored").

It's an incredible effort to lose the amount of weight he has and a daily fight to keep it from returning.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

FuturePastNow posted:

My first "building PCs" experience was from taking apart cheap old computers and putting them back together and upgrading them in cheap but effective ways. That's harder than it used to be as modern prebuilts from companies like Dell and HP are now full of proprietary parts and have the bare minimum power supply to turn on.

Won't argue with them putting in poo poo power supplies. I've seen gaming setups from both that have a power supply in them that would have problems with the system near to full load. Granted that isn't something most people would ever do, and even outside of benchmarking probably won't hit it that hard, but still.

As to proprietary stuff, that really isn't an issue anymore. The motherboard might be about it, but they are generally standard layouts now (Dell loved using custom boards that worked only in their cases for example). A lot of the stuff is just standard, more than likely un-branded, off the shelf hardware.

The worse offense is that they are still putting in spinning drives in computers. Last I looked (a few months ago), HP only had like 1-2 very low end systems with them, but Dell was putting them in as the only drive on a lot of their low and mid-range systems.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

I'll be 44 this year. I built my first computer when I was about 20. It was a duron (667 mhz), with everything but the OS. I remember it being around $600-650.

I built a first gen Ryzen system about 5 years ago I think it was. Everything but the OS and case. It was $725. That was with a 750 watt ps and a 1060 vid card (before the bitcoin bubble).

I remember when I was in 2nd or 3rd grade my Dad bought a computer, as he needed it for work. 486 maybe. I remember it was a grand give or take (he was able to write it off so that helped).


If you shopped and didn't have a need/want for the top of the line setup, prices have been really steady outside of when they first started getting into homes, and not counting the shortage globally now of components of course.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Part of that Surface review that LTT did, I personally wouldn't of pegged them for it not being user serviceable. The reason being, even though Microsoft said they are all for Right-To-Repair, that announcement came out within the last week. The dev time for that laptop would of been a year to two years easy. Well before Microsoft said they were "actively looking into right to repair".

He does get way overly arrogant about a few things though. Take how he views burning movies for one example. Now he did say that he would still do laptop reviews if they weren't really in the same field as the lego one he invested in. Given time, if the company makes it, it could be in the same league though. That said, his staff is large enough he could never do another laptop review at all easily enough.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

If they had someone take a box fan and put their frame on it, it would of been better than that thing.

Steve mentions multiple times, Corsair didn't make it, barely knows how it is supposed to work. It was some third party, and honestly the thing looks like someone at Corsair knows someone that had access to a commercial 3D printer and somehow Corsair said "Cool, go make one, that sounds cool!"

If Corsair had actual input on the thing, even for something as goofy as a wall mount, they would of caught how underpowered the motor on the thing is, and not at all suited for the thing. Steve was thinking it didn't have enough grease in it, hence why it was failing within 10 or so minutes. I'd guess it also doesn't have any cooling.

It was neat to see once they got it "working", but other than how it looked, was really poorly done.

IF Corsair were to actually make one, I think it would be amazing if they had a setup so it could replace the side panel on one of their cases, hook into iCue, speed control, whole thing. Would it be ungodly expensive? Yes. But who cares.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Begall posted:

IMO the e waste generated by the viewers of tech YouTubers must be an absolutely tiny part of the overall problem when you consider:

The PC parts promoted are almost always to a standard form factor that can be recycled into other standards-conforming devices. Compare this to the absolute mountain of bullshit e waste that Dell and other OEMs puts out that has no or extremely limited value past their inclusion in the original systems - systems that the audience of tech YouTubers are extremely unlikely to buy.

The audience is also far more likely to understand the value of the parts they have and therefore seek to sell on for someone else to use. Compare this to the buyer of a Dell prebuilt, especially bulk buyers, who must be far more likely to simply throw out complete systems once they reach end of life rather than harvest for value (partly because of the lack of value in doing so as mentioned above).

To your last point, companies buying dozens, if not hundreds of pre-built systems. How much they are recycled or turned into e-waste I think will depend on a few things. Does the company want to recycle? I would like to think that they do in this day and age. It will also depend on if there is an electronic recycling company in their area.

About an hour south of me there are two e-recyclers. Both of them handle large companies (literal pallets stacked 8' high with towers). They also both will re-sell the systems. After going over them and removing ones that have bad damage/outright broken, they have storefronts that the public are welcome to, where they can pick up laptops, monitors, towers, printers, often TV's, and even cables of all sorts, iphones (usually 5's and 6's, but I saw a few 7's a month or so ago). Just about anything you can think of honestly. The one recycler also works out, as part of their contract with the company they are recycling/reselling for, gets a percentage of the sale of their stuff. Quite often they make money on the deal, though it can take a year or more.

I've bought literally dozens of systems from the one place. They might have a few scuffs on them, but have all been very solid systems. Toss a SSD in them, maybe double the memory (they usually had 8 gig and a platter drive), and they have all been very dependable systems. I've done this for my parents, aunt, a rural township to upgrade all their systems, my kid, and a few friends. Plus the prices are maybe 20-25% what the stuff was new.

Laptops usually, the batteries aren't the greatest. Monitors I tend to stay away from, as their backlights are generally very dim.

Then when it was time to upgrade, I take them back to the place I got it from, they recycle them for free, and just get a "new" one.

Koskun fucked around with this message at 19:30 on Oct 31, 2021

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Combat Pretzel posted:

When their upcoming labs stuff is gonna tear a hole into their financials, it's probably gonna ramp up some. I guess the other activities of LMG don't generate satisfactory revenue. Or it's simply just MONEY.
If I remember right, Linus said that a good chunk of their profits come from their merchandise. I'd guess it doesn't match what a 10 million plus subscription gets (plus their other channels), but it wasn't anything to sneeze at. It is why so many youtubers find some company to make stuff for them. Linus though does seem to be making sure the stuff is good quality, and not just any ole "sure we can put that logo on a blank t-shirt for ya" company.


njsykora posted:

Youtubers who try and do knowing winking links (Linus) and subtle hard to notice transitions (Rene Ritchie) into ad reads infuriate the piss out of me. You know people are just going to skip past it so just say "now for an advert" like Michael Fisher does, and he's even started marking out the sponsor spot as a Youtube chapter (and before that had a big "Sponsor Message" box on screen during it) so it's easy to skip.

Most, maybe all, of LTT's video's for a while now have had the main promotion/sponsor ad listed as a chapter, but not the inserts they toss in during the video.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Over the past few months Jay has said he isn't quite sure what videos to keep making, hence why there has been so many talking head ones lately.

He's as frustrated over the video card shortage and that every launch is seemingly a paper one. Very annoyed at nVidia and AMD for releasing the ti/XT line when they can't keep up with the normal versions as well.

Out side of the oddball cases he seems to get sent semi-regularly (which is his latest personal build), there isn't much to review for a site like his it seems. LTT has a broad array of people with different hobbies and such, so they hit a lot of things. For Jay it's him. There are only so many ways to do a "custom water loop", which he's acknowledged too. He did some other stuff last year (the drone stuff was amusing if nothing else), but yeah, how many ways can you watch a computer being built?

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Pilfered Pallbearers posted:

TBF the only things in shortage right now are GPUs and DDR5. Everything else is easily available.

Which isn't really fair at all. Want to build a computer, well hope you like onboard graphics. Want to build a new 12th gen Intel, hope you want no upgrade path because you have to resort to DDR4.

That doesn't even touch the shipping issues of getting something back in stock. What might be "easily available" today can be gone with no ETA next week pretty easily right now.

Sure, if you want to pay scalper prices, anything is available, to be fair that is.

Pre-built is honestly about the only way to get a GPU, and probably DDR5, now a days at anything close to MSRP. For most people that works, however how many times can you review what are essentially cookie cutter computers as well?

Koskun fucked around with this message at 00:12 on Feb 3, 2022

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

The whole throwing the wrench was hosed up, as Jake said. It almost looked like it was a new employee that was trying to prove they could do something, and it backfired. Linus had that quick line "cost me 1000 bucks", so sounds like there was damage and he's covering it.

As to the dish setup. Those things are going to catch wind and shift around. While it is 4 cinder blocks, and if they are 12", that is about 200 lbs on that platform, but that dish is a sail. I wonder if they do this setup for the views, then have an actual installer/contractor come out and make it a more permanent install, as in attaching it to the roof itself instead of just sitting on it.

I don't really doubt that wind speed link, but it would only take one time for a big gust to come along and poof one or both of those satellites.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

BlankSystemDaemon posted:

they stole that look from chieftec

A few companies "borrowed" the design. The two I have in storage are Antec.

For what they were, at the time they were pretty good cases. As mentioned they were tanks. All steel. The case alone was pushing 25-30 pounds. Made going to LAN's a workout.

Size wise, they were advertised as a "server tower", however by modern standards they are just a bit shorter than modern mid to full ATX cases. Plus they are a touch narrower (no cable management area).

You would think the room inside would be easy to work with, but they ended up a mess due to no cable management. The removable hard drive cages were nice, for a bit. Since they came out inside the case, instead of sideways to it, your video card would interfere with one pretty quickly. It also didn't help that only one of the cages had a fan in front of it.

Speaking of fans, it had 4, which was nice. They were all 80mm, and no dust filters at all. It didn't take long for everything to be coated.

I ran one for a good 10 years though, but wouldn't consider something like it ever again.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

I'm pretty sure, during one of the new home videos, they mentioned that Jake lived with Linus and family for a while.

It looks to me like it's just a good friendship honestly.


As to using staff to move equipment. Linus does seem to be stuck in the mindset of "I'm not rich, I have to save every penny I can because I'm so poor." Given what I remember of how he grew up (split family, never had a lot of money), that can be a real hard mindset to get out of. He's said a few times that he is a literal millionaire now, so the optics do come across pretty bad, especially when you add on his blindness to "I'm the best boss, union isn't needed" he's said in the past.

That said, what with fuel prices atm, even if he paid the staff that was there overtime, it probably came out well cheaper than a moving company. Also a moving company could be a real gamble with some of the equipment and furniture he has in that place. A lot of times, they (the movers) don't give a crap about it. As long as it gets from point A to point B in a mostly complete fashion, their job is done. I've seen a very few companies actually care about your stuff, but most of the time they can be worse than UPS and FedEx combined as to how the condition of your things fare during the move.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

gradenko_2000 posted:

more of a general knowledge question: is USB-C as a connector more expensive than micro-USB, at scale, such that we're still going to be seeing a divide between them in cheap vs. premium parts/components moving forward, or can we expect universal adoption of USB-C, if it hasn't happened already?

Because it can be plugged in either way, it does take more connections (each side) than previous USB plugs. But at scale, the costs is maybe in the cent or two per for basic cables.

Once it gets into power delivery, especially to meet the new max (which I don't think any cable's exist yet for), that does take more money and quality, but that hasn't ever stopped places from making very cheap cables before, so.

I think we will get to USB-C as a universal connection once Apple switches. Europe slapped them pretty hard over it, and rumor is the next model of phone will be USB-C instead of Lightning.

Cheap and/or knockoff stuff (so anything that has a USB connection for power) I suspect will stay Micro-USB for a while yet, as the stockpile of Micro cables that are laying around has to be substantial. Eventually though I think everything will just be C, unless D, E, F, or whatever they decided to make that is "better" shows up.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Martian Manfucker posted:

Were they really just door knobs? The impression I got was that they removed fancy card/badge reading door handles, not just regular old door knobs. Makes more sense to me that way, at least.

Linus mentioned in the WAN show that they were security door handles, but it seemed like they were the non-smart mechanical kind where you punch in a code to unlock them. Now, if the previous tenant went out of business, could they find anyone who knows the codes so they can pass it on to the new tenant? If they moved to a new location, might be an annoyance to find the person with the codes. Or (what I think happened), they installed them and wanted to take them with. However not replacing them with some sort of handle is just dumb.

Them taking the paper towel dispensers though? No-touch ones they just bought maybe and wanted to take with to new location?

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

Thanks Ants posted:

10 million for an industrial unit? That sounds like a hell of a lot but maybe the market is just that hot, or it's huge.

I think he said it's around 20k square feet.

The market in Vancouver does look to be incredibly insane right now. I looked up the nearest large city to me (200k population) and Chicago listings for 20-30k square ft. Prices go from 0.9 to 1.5 mil "locally" and 0.8 to 6 mil in Chicago (the lower end ones are just this side of abandoned/blight judging by a quick glance at the pictures).

I popped over to Vancouver and prices are 8-18mil (CAD).

10 mil Canadian is 7.75 mil US. So for a modern building that is up to code, it's on the high end, but looks about right for the market at this insane moment.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

gradenko_2000 posted:

I've been watching a couple of videos on installing an Android OS to an x86 PC, presumably as a "lite" alternative to an OS if you have a machine that's otherwise too low-power to really keep up with general Windows usage anymore

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FGk3-dzXi3s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDqxa5xBJDs

and it had me thinking: how much more powerful is an old x86 CPU (say, a Skylake-era Pentium or a Bulldozer-era APU) compared to a current-day flagship phone? I'd expect the answer to be "much more powerful" just from the PC having a much larger power envelope (and chip size/transistor count?) but I don't really know. Anyone have any experience with this, or even just a theoretical background? It seems like an interesting way to create a posting station from an otherwise way-too-old machine

There is also the Android x86 project. I've played around with it a few times, and it works mostly well. The biggest issue is whether wi-fi will work or not. Bluetooth I could get it to see, but not actually connect to anything. And for whatever reason auto-rotate of the screen never worked. I tested it out on a few old PC tablets I have laying around and a first gen Surface Pro. Oh, the other issue I saw is it will run the CPU pretty hot, like on the Surface it was noticeably warm to the touch.

I haven't played around with it in a year or more at this point, but worth a look.


Klyith posted:

Like, have you tried using a ~10 year old PC with windows 10? It works fine. I have a guest PC built from an 4-core 3500 Ivy Bridge and it works fine as desktop apps, internet, and posting station. Admittedly this is a desktop not a laptop. Old laptops tend to get way more creaky and unreliable than old desktops. But either way, the main thing is to have a SSD.

In my experience with old laptops a lot depends on how much you want to tear it down. Anything 6+ years old you will pretty much have to put new thermal paste on the CPU and possibly GPU (specs of the laptop depending of course), clean out the fans, screens, and heatsink/heatsinks. Usually the two main things to look out for are the monitor ribbon cable and power port. I can't recall ever having to replace the ribbon cable, but power and/or USB ports, those I have had to fix before. Of course it depends on how much the former owner(s) used it. A corporate machine that spent it's life in a dock, great except the battery is probably shot. A student lugging it around, more chances of something being broke like a USB port, power port, maybe the ribbon cable.

All that said, while they are more of a pain to clean and repair (much more of a pain depending on model), SO many small screws, generally speaking they are just as reliable as desktops.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

CoolCab posted:

jay put out a video as a parent's guide about your kids becoming influencers and it includes the fact he randomly audits his 13 year old daughters phone.

im not a parent but that's kind of hosed up right? feels like if you haven't built that baseline level of trust really they shouldn't have a phone to begin with, idk

As a parent, this is quite the subject to dive into. Some parents let their kids go wild on their phones. Some monitor it like Jay (or more). Some are middle ground.

I can see a middle ground pretty easily. Unfettered access to the internet at the 11-15 age could do some real harm, and they just don't have the life experiences to process something they may come across.

There are plenty of horror stories about kids having unlimited access to whatever they can find online, and the results. A LOT of it will depend on the parenting for sure. Teaching a child that if something doesn't feel right, they can ask. There have been a few stories about this in light of some of the recent mass shootings.

It isn't about trust honestly. Sometimes they just might not be able to see the rabbit hole they are slipping down.

Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

cage-free egghead posted:

I've always been curious about Android emulators like Bluestacks, is this comparable? There's a couple times a year I'd like to just run an emulator for a few games on Android rather than having a phone with it.

No. The x86 project is an actual install of Android on PC hardware. As I said, it's been over a year (well over the more I thought about it) since I ran it. The install is linux for the hard drive format, and they have it pretty straight forward. It isn't all that dissimilar from any OS install really. It also allows you to do a Live boot to see how it will run before/if you decide to actually install it. Last I knew it was faking a Google Pixel as the DeviceID.

E - A bit more info. It is a barebones Android install. It does include the Play Store, and setup is just like one would do on any "regular" Android device. You can even add it to your existing Google account if you wish with no problems. Whether an individual app would run, either at all or well, is really hit or miss.

One could install it in a VM if they wanted it here and there on a PC I suppose. That said, Win11 is getting the ability to run Android apps natively. The version of Windows with it is on the Insider Build now. So 2-3 months before it goes live?

There is also Chrome OS Flex, but it's still in pretty early beta, and it has a Certified Model list. Some stuff it works well, others barely. Plus the list hasn't been updated since late March of this year.

Koskun fucked around with this message at 04:26 on Jul 1, 2022

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Koskun
Apr 20, 2004
I worship the ground NinjaPablo walks on

They might be using the Android 11 built in ARM translation. As I said, it's been quite a while since I ran it. The apps I tried that I can recall were all news ones, as the plan at the time was to make something that would sit on my desk and be a news and weather alert system. I remember getting fed up because well over half the apps I wanted to install would either not launch, launch and crash, or run but maybe work.

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