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shortspecialbus
Feb 16, 2006

WOULD YOU ACCOMPANY ME ON A BRISK WALK? I WOULD LIKE TO SPEAK WITH YOU!!




Bleck posted:

I want to try to get better but I also don't want to try very hard

that being said, Izaw is probably your best bet

Thanks, and your joke summary is pretty accurate. I'm not looking to become great or start winning tournaments, but usually there's some basic poo poo you can learn for various characters that will help you be a bit better with little effort, usually just their combos if nothing else, maybe some other quirks. 80/20 rule kind of thing. I looked for a few guides but they either just listed moves or were insufferable to listen to and used their own made up terminology that made little sense.

Thanks for the link, I'll take a look at those!

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Maple Leaf
Aug 24, 2010

Let'en my post flyen true


shortspecialbus posted:

who makes decent youtube character guides that are geared more towards casual players who would like to learn how to play a character a bit better but have no plans to get really good and learn all the bonkers high-level stuff?

I made one for Ridley, which a lot of people really enjoyed (with an update, my thoughts on some match-ups, and my thoughts on his 4.0 buffs); Piranha Plant (which, on the flipside, was not very well received); Wolf, and Banjo.

shortspecialbus
Feb 16, 2006

WOULD YOU ACCOMPANY ME ON A BRISK WALK? I WOULD LIKE TO SPEAK WITH YOU!!




Maple Leaf posted:

I made one for Ridley, which a lot of people really enjoyed (with an update, my thoughts on some match-ups, and my thoughts on his 4.0 buffs); Piranha Plant (which, on the flipside, was not very well received); Wolf, and Banjo.

I liked your Ridley video a lot - it's a bit over my skill level to be much use for me right now, but it was well done, interesting, and I didn't hate listening to you at all!

edit: I'll explain what I meant by that - it's actually not over my head really so much as right now I haven't played in 5-ish years and while I started with the first smash bros on N64 when I was in college, I always just played with friends or the CPU and took a cartoon character and hit the other cartoon characters. I'm trying to get at least a little better than that, but I have effectively zero knowledge of actual gameplay mechanics and there's a lot of overwhelming stuff. I found a couple beginner videos (one on your channel actually) that I'm focusing on a bit more right now while I go on a journey of discovery and find out that nair isn't just for removing leg hair.

shortspecialbus fucked around with this message at 23:03 on Feb 19, 2021

Bongo Bill
Jan 17, 2012

From my point of view, the Jedi are evil. But what really is... evil?

Right. The basics.

First, pay close attention to all the common mechanics. Walking, running, crouching, crawling if applicable. Jumping to full height or short height, midair jumping. Special attacks with the B button, including recovering with up special, and changing direction in midair if you can. Standard attacks, and the difference between tilt and smash attacks. The five aerial attacks. Shielding, rolling forward and backward, sidestep dodging, air dodging. Grabbing, pummeling, throwing in each of four directions, and mashing out of a grab. The different ways of climbing up from the ledge (push the stick towards the platform, jump, attack, shield, fall down, fall away). The different ways of getting up when knocked down (roll by pressing left or right, stand by pressing up or shield, or attack). Influencing the direction you're launched in. Throwing or dropping items.

Internalize the rock-paper-scissors setup at the core of the game: blocking beats attacking, grabbing beats blocking, and attacking beats grabbing. Everything else in the game is just a way to vary the spacing or timing of those three basic kinds of action. Some of the details like projectiles, reflection, disjoints, armor, invincibility, clashing, and so forth will start to become evident as well.

Once you're more aware of those, you can start paying attention to how they interact with time. Each of those actions has your character play an animation, and at certain parts of that animation your character is vulnerable to being interrupted, because you can't do anything else until it completes. The move itself has its animation, and it's also important to pay attention to the landing animation after performing an attack in midair, which varies per attack. Sometimes it's possible to initiate your next move even while an animation is playing, and sometimes it's not. Learning the timing on all of the moves in the game will come in due time, but you have to notice this fundamental language. It's actually found in nearly every action game, so it'll likely be a simple matter of just being explicit about something you can already intuit.

Then you can pay attention to the building blocks of tactics: after you hit an opponent, what situation does it leave them in and what situation does it leave you in? Where are they located, and how soon will you be able to act again? You might have a follow-up attack that can hit where they are before they have a chance to do anything about it. That's all a combo is. The particular complexity of Smash is that, because opponents are launched farther when their damage is higher, different combos are possible at different times.

Based on this information you can figure out what each move a fighter has is meant to be used for. Some are meant to be parts of combos. Some are meant to finish combos, KOing the enemy after you maneuver them into a position where you can hit them more easily. Some are just meant to interrupt an enemy who's trying to combo you. For some, the main purpose of the move is that the enemy can avoid them easily, but the action they use to avoid them is something you can take advantage of.

Each fighter can be broadly classified into one of three types, indicative of what kind of tactics they can execute best. Every fighter can do all three, but tend to do one better than the others. Rushdown (e.g. Mario) wants to get through an enemy's defenses and hit them with a combo. Grapplers (e.g. Ganondorf) want to bait the enemy into trying something risky and punish them hard for it. Zoners (e.g. Simon) want to prevent the enemy from being able to move freely and deny them options. Each of these three archetypes has to apply different strategies against the others, and the nuances of that are what characterize matchups.

That's a lot to think about. Focus on just a few at a time to pay attention to as you practice and it will become habit soon enough.

Maple Leaf
Aug 24, 2010

Let'en my post flyen true


Ariong posted:

Since the last time I posted a replay I feel I have gotten much better and, more importantly, better at identifying what I did wrong in any given game. However, I have once again had a game where I feel like I played very strongly but still lost, and would like some feedback as to what I could have done differently.

Before viewing this replay, please note that I do not normally spam the blunderbuss and crown as much as I do in this game. I do it here because I found it tp be particularly effective against this opponent, who I had fought a few times before this.

80T9V3FQ

Had a chance to watch it, and while I did see some improvements, I also noticed that some of your habits from last time had carried over. My timestamps will be on the in-game timer as before.

tl;dr: While I list all the times I see real improvement, I also note all the times you either go right back to what you used to do (namely, giving up positioning in favour of returning to neutral) and all the times you had stronger options available, but you never take them. While I do see change in your playstyle, you're still not using K. Rool's full kit to the best of your abilities - the one dash-attack you did was probably a misinput and you don't once go for a nair, a dair, a bair, or a grab. It looks like you focused more on improving what it is you do instead of expanding upon it. Which is fine - improvement is a one-step-at-a-time process - but your flowchart of options is already so narrow, and what's there has such an over-emphasis on maintaining neutral, that there's only so much polishing of what you already do before you run into obstacles like what happened in this match.

Like I suggested last time, you should consider fighting a CPU specifically to explore unorthodox options that you wouldn't think to consider in a real match, most specifically K. Rool's nair, which is a very, very powerful option. The more you consciously choose those unusual options in a fight, your muscle memory will slowly work them in and you'll eventually be using them against humans.

5:00 - So when did you notice that Smash Meter was on? lol

4:55 - This was an aggressive opening and you did it pretty well: you established "lane" control with Blunderbuss and you communicated to DK what his options were, and none of them appealed to him, so he stayed in shield (the worst option, because even if he jumped and gave up positioning, he'd still have mobility options; shielding gave him absolutely nothing) and you punished him with fair into ftilt.

4:51 to 4:42 - Everything about this sequence is textbook K. Rool edgeguarding and you did it immaculately. It even looked like you threw the crown a little too early, but the rebound meant it covered DK's landing options and forced him into taking the usmash. However, at 4:42, you should have recognized that DK was hit too high for your rinse-and-repeats to work, and you should have covered the platform with Blunderbuss. If he decided to go low to avoid that, you can still cover the low recovery with Blunderbuss because you can pass through platforms. If you're in this position, using Blunderbuss on the platform is generally the better option because you can cover low options while still holding Blunderbuss, but, inversely, you can't cover high recoveries with it because you can't jump with it out.

4:33 - After knocking DK away and forcing him onto a platform, which, as I discussed last time, is a disadvantageous position for him to be in, you instinctively went back to your old habits of dashing away and surrendering more stage control instead of pressuring his weak position. You realized your mistake about a second later and ran back towards him, and to your credit, you did hit him on the top platform with fair, but a more astute opponent is going to recognize that you're offering to return to neutral and they're going to take that.

4:27 - Like this; you're more than halfway into the stage while your opponent is on ledge. You want to set up for Crown + Blunderbuss but that combination is for controlling neutral, and this is the most you'll ever be in advantage. Stay closer to the ledge! Even just holding the Blunderbuss's windbox is far more pressuring and far more dangerous, considering his percent, than what you're planning to do right now.

4:18 - So, DK got up; shielded the cannonball; and you attempted to guess where he was going to be with ftilt. Making reads is part of the game and all, but you also knew that he was locked into shield because of the cannonball, making him more vulnerable to a grab or to a ballsy dsmash or something - rolling into you was probably the last thing on his mind. You got grabbed, cargo'd, and stage spiked for this decision.

Speaking of, there is never a reason not to press shield to tech when you're in this position. If DK throws you out, then pressing shield does nothing; if he throws you in, you tech. You can't spam it, of course, but if you have even the slightest feeling that he's going to stage spike you, there's no harm in doing it and there's no reason not to.

4:06 - K. Rool has a very powerful recovery, especially compared to DK, and you shouldn't be afraid to punish him for going for those more daring offstage plays against you. He tried to use dair you for a quick kill, and when it whiffed, you, in response, should have double-jumped uair'd him. It probably wouldn't have killed, but it would have given you free passage back to the stage and it would have given him a bit more damage.

4:03 - Exact same thing: your recovery is so strong that you could have easily punished this with a nair or a bair.

4:00 - DK was on the ledge after you, meaning he got onto the stage after you did, meaning you had the pressure and could have grabbed him or something, but, again, you ran to the entire opposite end of the stage to establish neutral. I can practically see you fighting the urge to use Crown - which, ironically, since you opted to return to neutral, this would have been a good time to use it.

3:55 - By now, you should recognize what this DK's self-imposed win-condition is: get the grab, probably after an aerial hand slap, and stage spike, since he knows you're not putting in the effort to tech it.

3:50 - It almost looked like you were going to do it again, which, if intentional, was good conditioning - after all, I fell for it. That was your first dash attack of the match, I think, which leads me to believe it was a misinput.

3:42 - World's easier bair or dair right here, but you didn't have the guts to try it. Because K. Rool's recovery is so strong and forgiving, you have way more offstage punish options than nearly everyone in the cast; don't be afraid to go for the more daring plays because K. Rool can accommodate them really easily.

3:36 - You did this exact same sequence before DK had lost his previous stock and you got punished for it; the only reason you didn't get punished this time is because DK assumed you were going to try something different, and you didn't. Mixing up your ledge options and what to do when your opponent is coming off the recovery platform is important.

3:22 - This was a good use of Blunderbuss for the exact same reason it was a good use at the very beginning: you established control and used that pressure to follow up from a different angle. While you ultimately didn't do any damage, DK still had to jump to get away from you, which is what you wanted from the beginning: stronger positioning. Now that you recognize what you're doing and what you're forcing your opponent to do, the next step to work on is punishing what options you believe your opponent still has - in this case, jumping away.

3:11 - If you're in this position, where DK is above you and you're both offstage, realistically, the odds of him punishing you from directly above your helicopter are next to zero, so recovering into DK would have been the stronger move.

3:07 - It was a good usmash, and you had all the stage to play with, but you got too greedy and opted to jump after him for additional follow-ups. Remember that being underneath your opponent is always the stronger position, so chasing after your opponent isn't always the better move - this game has gravity, after all, and eventually, DK must come to you, he doesn't have a choice in the matter.

2:56 - Exactly my point: you hit him with two usmashes, and you tried to read him retreating to a platform with a fair, but he double-jumped away and back onto the top platform. Although your opponent is in the weaker position, always keep track of whether they spend their double-jump or not, because that's an option that they have to get away from you until they don't. Once they lose their double-jump, all they have left is their airdodge and their recovery, both of which are hugely risky, last-resort options.

2:43 - Remember what I said about self-imposed win-conditions? DK is at high percent, you're at zero, and he's on his last stock - you know exactly what he wants and your entire prerogative is to not give it to him. This would be exactly when you want to sit centre stage - as far from a ledge as you can be - and just throw Crowns and Blunderbusses so that he's forced to abandon his win-condition (i.e. get the grab near the ledge). You choosing to run up and ftilt his shield is the second-worst option you could have chosen, after dash-attack.

2:39 - To be fair, this was pretty slick.

Maple Leaf fucked around with this message at 20:05 on Feb 20, 2021

Ariong
Jun 25, 2012





Thank you!!!! Iíll go through the play-by-play later. The dash attack was not a misinput, I just donít go for them as often as I should because I have trouble with the inputs and I often end up doing a different move accidentally. Same goes for nair, honestly! I keep doing fair instead.

Iíll go ahead and do some practicing against level 9 NPCs to expand my portolfio of moves I ever use. Question: what would be the best way to practice teching?

EDIT: Is the comment at 5:00 because smash meter is bad? That match was on my preferred ruleset. What do you recommend? Ball, meter, or no FS at all?

Maple Leaf
Aug 24, 2010

Let'en my post flyen true


Ariong posted:

Thank you!!!! Iíll go through the play-by-play later. The dash attack was not a misinput, I just donít go for them as often as I should because I have trouble with the inputs and I often end up doing a different move accidentally. Same goes for nair, honestly! I keep doing fair instead.

Iíll go ahead and do some practicing against level 9 NPCs to expand my portolfio of moves I ever use. Question: what would be the best way to practice teching?

EDIT: Is the comment at 5:00 because smash meter is bad? That match was on my preferred ruleset. What do you recommend? Ball, meter, or no FS at all?

I hadn't considered that you were trying to input for some attacks and you were getting others. The only real solution I have to mistakes like those is to practice and get a feel for how far the control stick needs to be in order to get the inputs you want. I've co-mained Banjo since the day he came out and I still occasionally get Wonderwing when I want Rear Egg (and the results are about as good as you'd expect).

One good way to practice the timing for techs is to go to Training Mode, select someone with a strong, single-hit forward smash (and switch to Pichu for his multi-hit fsmash once you're comfy); go to Hyrule Temple or Great Cave Offensive; set your damage to around 40% (and don't reset it after every attempt); and set the CPU to repeatedly use forward smash. The goal is to get hit by the attack and then press shield within... I think it's ten frames? Of hitting a surface. When done correctly, your character should absorb all the knockback upon impact and not actually go anywhere. If you start seeing the colour red after hitting a surface, that means your damage is too high for you to tech, so you can reset your percentage. Remember that you can tech any surface you hit, including walls, ceilings, floor, and even the lava to prevent a stock loss at 100% or over.

This method will get you used to the feel and timing of teching an attack, but you're in a controlled environment with the CPU repeatedly doing the same thing at regular intervals, so it's not exactly good practice for the real thing. Once you're getting the timing down consistently, turn the CPU to Attack, and now you have to deal with different moves at different times, which is considerably better practice.

For the Smash Meter thing: I'm just used to the standard competitive ruleset, which is no FS at all. You can play the game how you like, of course: getting better at the game isn't dependent on playing with a certain ruleset.

Maple Leaf fucked around with this message at 20:08 on Feb 20, 2021

Katamari Democracy
Jan 18, 2010

Oh, We understand.
A trip to collect a million votes, yes.
Oh, we know why.
We get the point of rolling up a million


Wedge Regret

I have spent over $300 dollars on those Power A wireless controllers and I am sick of them breaking down on me. I can be semi competitive but drat I have played on literal gamecube controllers harder in my younger years

But a good friend told me about a store that sells replicas of gamecube controllers that rumble and are about 12 dollars and its the best controller I ever owned.

Moral of the story is do not purchase those Power A controllers. They are a rip off and they do not last long.

Ariong
Jun 25, 2012





Maple Leaf posted:

I hadn't considered that you were trying to input for some attacks and you were getting others. The only real solution I have to mistakes like those is to practice and get a feel for how far the control stick needs to be in order to get the inputs you want. I've co-mained Banjo since the day he came out and I still occasionally get Wonderwing when I want Rear Egg (and the results are about as good as you'd expect).

One good way to practice the timing for techs is to go to Training Mode, select someone with a strong, single-hit forward smash (and switch to Pichu for his multi-hit fsmash once you're comfy); go to Hyrule Temple or Great Cave Offensive; set your damage to around 40% (and don't reset it after every attempt); and set the CPU to repeatedly use forward smash. The goal is to get hit by the attack and then press shield within... I think it's ten frames? Of hitting a surface. When done correctly, your character should absorb all the knockback upon impact and not actually go anywhere. If you start seeing the colour red after hitting a surface, that means your damage is too high for you to tech, so you can reset your percentage. Remember that you can tech any surface you hit, including walls, ceilings, floor, and even the lava to prevent a stock loss at 100% or over.

This method will get you used to the feel and timing of teching an attack, but you're in a controlled environment with the CPU repeatedly doing the same thing at regular intervals, so it's not exactly good practice for the real thing. Once you're getting the timing down consistently, turn the CPU to Attack, and now you have to deal with different moves at different times, which is considerably better practice.

For the Smash Meter thing: I'm just used to the standard competitive ruleset, which is no FS at all. You can play the game how you like, of course: getting better at the game isn't dependent on playing with a certain ruleset.

Alright, thanks so much! Regarding final smashes: I tend to go smash meter because final smashes are fun, and Roolís smash is actually super good and versatile in my experience, but I donít like chasing after smash balls. Only problem is that sometimes Iíll get a full meter when Iím not expecting it and blow it trying to fire a cannonball!

super fart shooter
Feb 11, 2003

-quacka fat-


Ariong posted:

Thank you!!!! Iíll go through the play-by-play later. The dash attack was not a misinput, I just donít go for them as often as I should because I have trouble with the inputs and I often end up doing a different move accidentally. Same goes for nair, honestly! I keep doing fair instead.

Iíll go ahead and do some practicing against level 9 NPCs to expand my portolfio of moves I ever use. Question: what would be the best way to practice teching?

EDIT: Is the comment at 5:00 because smash meter is bad? That match was on my preferred ruleset. What do you recommend? Ball, meter, or no FS at all?

Just a tip that might be helpful if you have trouble doing dash attacks on command: Instead of the A button, if you flick your right stick at the same time (or just slightly after) you flick your left stick to start dashing, you can easily do an an instant dash attack, without the risk of an accidental f-smash

Maple Leaf
Aug 24, 2010

Let'en my post flyen true


https://twitter.com/EmilyTheKoopa/status/1361898975641686017

Mokinokaro
Sep 11, 2001

At the end of everything, hold onto anything




Fun Shoe

Yinlock posted:

also rex is a good character but boy does his va blow chunks, which is weird since xb1's dub ruled

From what I can tell he's a live action actor not a VA and had zero direction. A lack of proper direction absolutely ruins voice acting performances no matter the language.

W.T. Fits
Apr 21, 2010


They'll never see it coming...


Mokinokaro posted:

From what I can tell he's a live action actor not a VA and had zero direction. A lack of proper direction absolutely ruins voice acting performances no matter the language.

Yeah, I remember when the first Dissidia game came out, people criticized it for its bad voice work, and Kuja's English VA responded that the English cast had no direction beyond, "Listen to the Japanese version of the lines and try to match that as close as you can."

Zuzie
Jun 30, 2005

I got this for a Ratatta on GTS.



Its a common issue among dubbing for games really. Localization teams often don't have the time, budget or manpower to get the most accurate or best conveyed version of a specific scene. Its really only within the last few years that video game dubs reached the quality of movies and other media.

Justin_Brett
Oct 23, 2012

GAMERDOME put down LOSER

I think Pyra and Mythra's actor mentioned she wasn't given a great explanation on at least one of them, which is really apparent early on.

Endorph
Jul 22, 2009

I may not be as cute as the other girls, but I'm the best at arm wrestling!


Yeah, Pyra sounds pretty rough early on. She gets a bit better as the game goes on.

Likewise, Rex's va is fine when he's talking casually but is pretty terrible when a moment calls for big emotion, because he's barely given any direction for the big emotion.

It's a real shame because when dubs do have actual direction, they can be just as good as the JP. the Trails of Cold Steel dubs are great because the VAs actually got direction and understood their characters.

elf help book
Aug 5, 2004

It's not a dream, or a lie.
I know my sister is alive out there.


I normally play all games dubbed but I only lasted an hour like that with Xenoblade 2

Endorph
Jul 22, 2009

I may not be as cute as the other girls, but I'm the best at arm wrestling!


im also not a fan of the name changes in xb2's translation. like the jp text uses japanese names for the blades and western names for the drivers to get across that they're different cultures, but the translation haphazardly uses western names for most but not all of them? but is sure to give western names to the blades that are very obviously japan themed, like the samurai guy or the one who uses japanese fireworks? but there's still some japanese blades. and they give the blades american accents and the drivers european accents but some of the blades have accents too.

the whole thing's just very stupid.

TheKingofSprings
Oct 9, 2012



https://twitter.com/ToastyDarkBagel/status/1363534230765133829
The fanart machine is fun as always.

Thereís no way Kazooie wouldnít dunk on Mythra from low orbit though

Ghost Leviathan
Mar 2, 2017

Exploration is ill-advised




Getting any direction or context can sometimes be sadly above average for video game voice acting. One Elder Scrolls game had the lines given to the voice actors in alphabetical order. And translated ones can be even worse there when the team isn't given enough notes or doesn't pick up on what the original writers thought was obvious. And then sometimes you get Samurai Pizza Cats.

Bleck
Jan 7, 2014




"The acting was bad because the director/producer sucked" is just generally how it goes, it's not even a video game specific thing.

multijoe
Oct 15, 2007

NYO~HO


Xenoblade 1 was voice directed by the same team who went on to do The Witcher voice work too, so that cast got a load more support and grounding to deliver performances in that genre too which is probably a fair amount of why Adam Howden compares so well to Rex's VA

TheKingofSprings
Oct 9, 2012



I am curious if anyone has a perspective on why voice direction in video games seems so bad sometimes.

Like, when I think of good voice direction I think of Andrea Romano, I guess there's not a lot of people like that in video games?

Zuzie
Jun 30, 2005

I got this for a Ratatta on GTS.



TheKingofSprings posted:

I am curious if anyone has a perspective on why voice direction in video games seems so bad sometimes.

Like, when I think of good voice direction I think of Andrea Romano, I guess there's not a lot of people like that in video games?

They're working with limited time, budget, manpower and direction.

This video has a better explanation about the whole thing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WjnRvDulhek

Red Minjo
Oct 20, 2010

Out of the houses, which is the most blue?

The answer might not be be obvious at first.

Gravy Boat 2k

My phone's push notifications really wanted me to know about the latest Switch Pro and Smash rumors. The Smash one is that planning for a concert in 2022 allegedly spoils the last 2 characters as Crash Bandicoot and some Monster Hunter rep. Which obviously can't be true because the last two characters are my good friends Hatsune Miku and Hakurei Reimu.

Scrap Dragon
Oct 6, 2013

SECRET TECHNIQUE:
DARK SHADOW
BLACK FALLEN ANGEL!




Yeah, the playable hunter kills that one, the MonHun devs are on record as not wanting a Hunter to represent the series in crossover. They were reportedly pretty upset when the MVC team went over their heads for Infinite and I canít see Sakurai going against their wishes like that

Scrap Dragon fucked around with this message at 22:40 on Feb 22, 2021

RBA Starblade
Apr 27, 2008

Going Home.



Games Idiot Court Jester


Scrap Dragon posted:

Yeah, the playable hunter kills that one, the MonHun devs are on record as not wanting a Hunter to represent the series in crossover. They were reportedly pretty upset when the MVC team went over their heads for Infinite and I canít see Sakurai going against their wishes like that

I still don't know why you would when you could have a palico instead

Procrastine
Mar 30, 2011




Isn't Rathalos in this game specifically because Sakurai asked the devs about putting in a Monster Hunter character and they said "no, put a boss fight in instead"?

Lux Animus
Apr 17, 2016

Posts from the end of the world




Dinosaur Gum

TheKingofSprings posted:

Like, when I think of good voice direction I think of Andrea Romano, I guess there's not a lot of people like that in video games?

As a person who knows Andrea I'm especially excited to see her name out in the wild. She really was an excellent director who worked on so many quality (and funny) shows!

Scrap Dragon
Oct 6, 2013

SECRET TECHNIQUE:
DARK SHADOW
BLACK FALLEN ANGEL!




I forgot that the Monster Hunter track from the leak (Proof of a Hero) is already in the game cause of the Rathalos boss fight. So that means the non-Crash character from that that leak could be from a franchise thatís already in

hatty
Feb 28, 2011



Pork Pro

Crash would be kinda lame tbh. The guy just spins and slides and we already have Mega Man

Lux Animus
Apr 17, 2016

Posts from the end of the world




Dinosaur Gum

Procrastine posted:

Isn't Rathalos in this game specifically because Sakurai asked the devs about putting in a Monster Hunter character and they said "no, put a boss fight in instead"?

Yes.

Also, rumor has is that Byleth (with her 'giant' weapons) was originally going to be the MonHun fighter, but those plans got scrapped in favor of more Fire Emblem reps, likely due to MonHun team only wanting Rathalos.

Macaluso
Sep 23, 2005

I HATE THAT HEDGEHOG, BROTHER!


hatty posted:

Crash would be kinda lame tbh. The guy just spins and slides and we already have Mega Man

Actually he would be extremely cool

WrightOfWay
Jul 24, 2010




Crash also has a bazooka.

Dabir
Nov 10, 2012


I'm all in on Kunio

Lux Animus
Apr 17, 2016

Posts from the end of the world




Dinosaur Gum

Yeah the big thing about the dubbing industry is that the process is 'supposed' to be done on the cheap, otherwise why else are you buying up a foreign property instead of making your own animated show???

Electric Phantasm
Apr 7, 2011

YOSPOS



Someone get Sakurai on the phone and tell him to implement this in Smash

https://twitter.com/ryo_redcyclone/...ingawful.com%2F

If you teabag with Dan or R. Mika they just start doing squats instead.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Dabir posted:

I'm all in on Kunio

Kunio is loving great and Technos has no representation despite being huge in the early days of Nintendo. The big turning point in The Wizard was Jimmy Woods being good at Double Dragon for gently caress's sake

LanceKing2200
Mar 27, 2007
Brilliant!!

I'm fine with Crash if and only if they also add a Mii costume that's the mascot Crash from the 90's commercials.

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hatty
Feb 28, 2011



Pork Pro

WrightOfWay posted:

Crash also has a bazooka.

So does Mega Man, further proving that Crash would be a Mega Man echo fighter

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