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meltie
Nov 9, 2003

Not a sodding fridge.

Pursesnatcher posted:

The best news came in the mail, however.



A benefactor from this thread sent me what feels like it may perhaps be the greatest care package in the history of mankind, and I am forever grateful. You can remain anonymous if you want, but as I told you, this made my month. I've just been skimming through it for a little while, but this might just be the most amazing, comprehensive and understandable guide to these fuel systems there is. It covers everything I could think of, and with the added power of Google, I can pretty easily figure out what all the new and exciting things it talks about are. Morale has been running a bit low lately, but this really gave me a new hope. Now, to reading!

That's some great night-time reading material right there!

meltie fucked around with this message at 11:10 on Aug 31, 2019

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madeintaipei
Jul 13, 2012



(To the tune of Warren Zevon's Roland the Headless Thompson Gunner)

Pursesnatcher was a warrior, from the land of the midnight sun. Wire-tester for hire, diagnostics to be done. The deal was made on craiglist, on a dark and rainstorm-y day, so he set out for the pull-a-part, to join the oily fray.

Pursesnaaatcher the garage-less mechanic
(Fixing to be done)
Pursesnaaatcher the garage-less mechanic
(Evens up the doors)

You can still hear his glove-less thumbs echo through the night, [insert Norwegian swearing here], in the flash, of Pursesnatcher's greee-eeease guuuunnnn.

e: To be clear, no offense intended. I wouldn't even think to make fun of you. This thread is neat, you're neat. Now replace that egr valve.

madeintaipei fucked around with this message at 16:52 on Sep 1, 2019

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Hahahaha, that is wonderful

EGR valve or no (plus there's more rain suddenly, so the garage-less mechanic can't get a lot of work done), I did have the hilarious opportunity to test drive a mid-noughties G500 at a dealership today.

It was really cool, as it let me compare a nearly tip-top shape, low mileage, newer and more powerful car with mine. See how it's supposed to feel, sort of. It was great; bucket seats, refreshed interior, lots of it was upgraded to G63 standard. Surprisingly though, it didn't really feel that different. Sure, the gearbox was a completely different experience, and a lot smoother, but that was pretty much it.

My M117 supposedly delivered 241 horsepower and 277 ft-lbs when new, while the M113-powered baby I tried today comes with 288 hp and 336 ft-lbs out of the box – so it's just about 20% more powerful. On paper, that's the same difference as between my daily, a 166 hp CLK, and my previous fun-car, a 201 hp SLK. Now, those two cars are just a world of difference. The SLK felt like a rocket ship compared to my daily, and sure, a lot of that comes from ride height and weight, but still. I truly couldn't really feel any actual difference in power output between the new-ish G500 and my old 500GE. I guess the old boy has kept most of his power intact despite his age and the terrible neglect suffered (of course, it was a lot more lacking in power when I took ownership, but w/e).

So why was it hilarious, you wonder? Well, I only took it out for a short ride. A few miles, then back again. And not half a mile before I got back to the dealership, driving in a straight line, throttle response disappeared completely. I tried downshifting, I tried kickdown; nothing worked. No amount of jogging the gas pedal made any difference. So I had to pull off the road, kill the engine, and start it up again – and then it was all right again. I seriously couldn't stop laughing.

I'm beginning to think I might actually be cursed.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

It's been a slow month for the old wagon, but I've taken it out on some test runs with good results. It's a bit janky at times, with RPM's suddenly dropping off and the throttle being unresponsive – but only for a few moments at a time. If I jog the pedal, it starts working properly again. So it behaves pretty much as it should, and after reading a lot in my awesome new book, I'm thinking more and more that there's got to be a vacuum leak somewhere. I'll be taking it to the shop which sold it to me to check out the water leaks and a few other things, as that's technically "should be covered by warranty" stuff (even used cars come with a sort of warranty/buyers protection here. It's neat).

But since I haven't got anything to share from the G, I thought I might really quickly share some work I did on my beater today instead. It's also a star car, so it's technically not cheating, and it's a minor repair I never would have had the guts to perform if I hadn't spent so much time wrenching on my main project!



First off, there was nothing in the W209 owner's manual about jack points (aside from the ones on the sides, which wasn't very helpful). So I gambled that this protrusion here might hold, and it did. It's pretty much directly underneath the engine, if you ever need to jack one up.



Safety first, always. This was why the side jack points were no help.



Today's order of business: Brakes. I've been having vibrations and noises when braking this thing for way too long. Especially from the driver's side, and with a terrible racket if I braked while turning. Picked up new discs, pads and even brake shields online, and decided that I could do this. Since I've never done any work on cars myself before, uh, starting this thread, I don't really know when the brakes were last touched by anyone.



I thought there was a lot of wear left on the pads, but I'm pretty sure there's not supposed to be serious grooves on them. That was bad. We'll see the back on this brake disc in a moment. First though, other side.



This thing is apparently a wear sensor. I wish I'd known that I had one before I started out on this, because now I don't.



Wear sensors also do not tell you when your discs are worn. Note, this is my good disc.



Because Mercedes loves putting lovely screws everywhere, my bad disc didn't want to come off at all. So I got a drill out, and bored straight through this drat thing. That worked.



So this is the inside of my bad disc, next to a brand new one still in plastic. Timely replacement, I guess?



New disc, pads and stuff assembled! Go me! And it only took me two hours, of which I guess one was spent fighting that single bloody screw.

Sormus
Jul 24, 2007

PREVENT SPACE-AIDS
sanitize your lovebot
between users


I've probably missed this, but does the G-tank have a some sort of parking heating for winter use?

Humbug
Dec 3, 2006
Bogus

I don't know if you tried using one, but impact drivers are great for stuck chassis screws.

biltema link

blk
Dec 19, 2009


Holy crap, you're brave

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Sormus posted:

I've probably missed this, but does the G-tank have a some sort of parking heating for winter use?

It does! Both plug-in and fuel based, in fact. At the moment though, with engine cooling being what it is... I just use the heater core actively as part of the engine cooling. That makes fpr a very hot cabin, very quickly. Or did you mean for heating the engine when it gets to freezing?

Humbug posted:

I don't know if you tried using one, but impact drivers are great for stuck chassis screws.

biltema link

Good tip, haven't tried that! I should probably get one then, since I'm in no way done.

blk posted:

Holy crap, you're brave

Not too brave though. Disassembling the wheel hubs to get the new brake shields on my beater was a bit more than I was prepared to do.

Humbug
Dec 3, 2006
Bogus

Pursesnatcher posted:




Good tip, haven't tried that! I should probably get one then, since I'm in no way done.



Good stuff. I have that exact one, and its gotten some very rusty Phillips and slot head screws loose. There is a bit of a technique to using it though. Be sure to apply some counterclockwise force to the impact driver using your hand before hitting with a mallet. Just hitting it holding it loosely doesn't do much. Also, that driver is reversible, so make sure its in the right direction.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Og0wilzMtXY#t=186s

Humbug fucked around with this message at 09:00 on Oct 7, 2019

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

All right, I'm becoming seriously stumped by this intermittent power failure on my lovely wagon. It's still happening, even though it's gotten a bit better.

The latest trick I've found, which seems to help a bit, is to drop the shifter down from "D" to "3" for a while when the car starts acting up. If I'm in fourth gear, that'll force a downshift, and I'll be able to drive normally for a while. Maybe half a minute later, it seems I can stick it back in "D", and it'll upshift to fourth again, but now acting normally.

Now I'm wondering if I'm just imagining that this helps, like some kind of superstitious, "kick it just so and it'll go" voodoo stuff – or if this is a known symptom of, well, anything?

angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Does it ever act up idling in park, or is this exclusively something that happens at low load in motion?

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

I think it's acted up like this in park as well. Usually not, though. The normal trigger seems to be shifting from park to drive when it's warmed up. In that case, shifting back to park or neutral does nothing. It'll also just randomly act up at low load while out on the road, and that's when forcing it to 3rd seems to help.

angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Well it's almost certainly an engine management issue, but your system is unfamiliar to most.

Have you replaced O2 sensors, or priced them? As "throwing parts at the problem" goes, it may be worthwhile since so many other parts seem to be bespoke and expensive.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Hmmm, I have not. But that sounds very reasonable, come to think of it. It actually makes a lot more sense than hunting vacuum leaks. And it's at most $200 to replace. On the other hand, I'm pretty sure I've got an exhaust leak near the manifolds, so that might be throwing the sensor off as well. Thanks, this is a direction I'll try pursuing!

Pursesnatcher fucked around with this message at 21:04 on Oct 12, 2019

angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



Oven Wrangler

Definitely hunt vacuum leaks - but the sort of issues you're having would take a pretty major leak that would (I think) definitely affect idle pretty dramatically.

F4rt5
May 20, 2006



Yeah you're talking a hose that is, on second glance, quite obviously flapping around not connected to its nipple, like my old Audi when it ran a rough, almost choking like idle?

F4rt5 fucked around with this message at 22:38 on Oct 12, 2019

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

No updates for a while on account of winter being back, making it hard to go about fixing things. It's been a mild winter though, and I've managed to clock some miles on the car – and I'm growing a bit more confident about my repairs so far. The mandatory bi-annual safety-and-stuff checkup was almost due, so I took it to my trustworthy local shop – and it came back approved. That was a relief!

Also: The choke-and-die issues when starting it warm really aren't insurmountable. I only need to keep it switched off for half an hour now before I can keep driving without any trouble at all. If I wait any less, most of the time a single proper kickdown once it starts acting up will set things straight until I turn the engine off again. I'm also not overheating – in fact, the needle rests at about 90 Celsius at all times, and my electric blowers are managing to keep it under 100 even in stop-and-go traffic.

As for the water leaking into the cabin, it was from the drainage for the sunroof. I had a shop open it up, flush it out and dry it in their heated garage. Good times. Now there's going to be another month or two before I can start wrenching things myself. In the meantime I've saved up some money, and I'm going to have some experts look at my running gear, to at least diagnose why I've got terrifying shakes happening at speed. If it's not terribly labor intensive, I'll have them fix it. Otherwise I'll just buy the parts and wait until spring.

Bonus since you clicked, I found this amazing video, which is kind of relatable (even if my skills aren't close to his... yet, anyway):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRs-4AXb9_U

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Pursesnatcher posted:

As for the water leaking into the cabin, it was from the drainage for the sunroof. I had a shop open it up, flush it out and dry it in their heated garage.



I guess the drainage might have been clogged as well, but yeah, no, that wasn't it. From some past dealings I had a hunch that particular shop was just a bunch of swindlers; now I'm convinced. You live, you learn.

quote:

Now there's going to be another month or two before I can start wrenching things myself. In the meantime I've saved up some money, and I'm going to have some experts look at my running gear, to at least diagnose why I've got terrifying shakes happening at speed. If it's not terribly labor intensive, I'll have them fix it. Otherwise I'll just buy the parts and wait until spring.

Good news is I delivered my truck to said experts, and they diagnosed the poo poo out of the running gear. The terrifying shakes at speed was easy. CV joints on both ends of the axle from gearbox to transfer case were simply worn out. Pricey little shits, but I had them replaced while it was up in the air, and it's done wonders for the feeling of the whole car.

They also figured out why my car has been smelling like gasoline. It wasn't because it was running super-rich when hot or whatever. It was because the whole arrangement of pipes and what have you going into the top of the fuel tank had rusted through, and was spilling liquid platinum all over the place. So that was another hefty expense to replace, and a strike against my theory regarding the oxygen sensor.

But we'll see. I've booked an appointment with the good old M117 wizard next week; maybe he can figure out these last few mysteries.

slothrop
Dec 7, 2006

consider your chops: busted




Soiled Meat

Glad to hear you’re making progress on this beast. I was thinking about your thread the other day when was stuck in traffic with a G 63 in front of me. It was a 40+ Celsius Melbourne summers day and that thing smelled HOT. I had my window up, and aircon on recirc and I could still smell it!

You Am I
May 20, 2001

I will decide who posts John Howard pictures in this thread and the circumstances in which they post.


Pursesnatcher posted:

Bonus since you clicked, I found this amazing video, which is kind of relatable (even if my skills aren't close to his... yet, anyway):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRs-4AXb9_U
I have watched that video. That was so much metal work for such a basket case of a Rangie.

taqueso
Mar 8, 2004









Fun Shoe

Geez, that's a ton of work, just to make the stop motion video

Ferremit
Sep 14, 2007
if I haven't posted about MY LANDCRUISER yet, check my bullbars for kangaroo prints

All that effort and he didnt spring for a gas bottle for his mig??? I swear thats all flux core welding!

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

All right, so I had some experts take a look, and I AM VINDICATED! That is to say that even though I'm a complete dunce at a lot of this stuff, I was right on several points.

First, there is an exhaust leak, and it is at one of the manifolds. Left one, to be precise. Which is great, because that gives me an excuse to actually get in there and replace all the gaskets as a repair job, and not only as a cosmetic but-I-really-want-the-manifolds-coated job. The leak probably isn't throwing the O2 sensor off, but it's bad enough that it's probably the root cause of one set of terrifying ticking noises I keep hearing when applying power at speed.

Second, the IACV is probably kinda dead. The wizards tried removing and cleaning it (not knowing I had already done so), which didn't really do anything. However, all the actual problematic issues I'm having (like dying when starting warm unless I give it a lot of delightful revs) most likely stem from that.

So I was sort of right in where to look, which feels awesome. Now, even with new CV joints I'm still having some shakes at speed, especially after hitting bumps – so I might still need to check out the steering stabilizer (once the snow stops falling, anyway). Also, about a year ago I was whining about the octane this car wants and needs, and I got some good tips. After a few months of experimenting it seems that I can add about 15% of 95 RON gas, and it won't be overly bothered. However, once I get above 25%, it will complain, and it will run rough even after I've diluted the 95 RON with the 98 RON the car requires. So that's a finding.

slothrop posted:

Glad to hear you’re making progress on this beast. I was thinking about your thread the other day when was stuck in traffic with a G 63 in front of me. It was a 40+ Celsius Melbourne summers day and that thing smelled HOT. I had my window up, and aircon on recirc and I could still smell it!

The "normal" AMG versions are just beastly; I had one out for a good and mighty test run the other day, only time in my life I've had all four tires screaming from a standstill when I'm not even putting my foot down hard.

Also that stop motion movie making legend is just the best. He's got the most soothing voice, too. Awesome and inspiring videos.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Winter has (somewhat abruptly) given way to summer, so it's back to work on the old wagon. Cost of a new IACV turns out to have risen to around $1500 now, and I haven't won any lotteries, so that's simply going to have to wait. I'm looking at some refurbished ones, but at this moment, the old one also seems to have gotten a new lease on life. I'm suddenly no longer stalling when starting hot; quite the contrary – now cold starts lead to rough running, until it warms up and I turn it off and on again. Weird.

So instead I've decided to change out the rest of the old spark plug leads, to try eliminating what I think are misfires I'm getting when starting cold. It's also about time I got to changing the fuel filter. As I wrote earlier, it's at least 13 years and 80k miles old, since I have records going back that far. So in reality it's probably older. And it's supposedly hiding somewhere behind here:



I tried sticking my phone up behind stuff to take pictures, but none of them really showed me anything sensible. So I grabbed my tools and got to removing the big plastic liner behind the wheel. A surprisingly easy task, even if it took three different socket sizes to loosen six screws and one nut (a seventh screw was missing).

Anyway, peeking inside, actually finding my fuel system assembly was pretty easy. It looked exactly like this:



Which at first glance made me happy. So accessible!

But wait.



Pretty sure that's sorta wrong.

Seems the bracket is supposed to be attached to the car by four rubber "loops". For some reason, only the two at the rear were actually attached. They're old, too, and don't look nearly as solid as the ones you can see closest to the camera. So that's kind of amazing. I'm very glad the whole spectacle hasn't simply fallen off the car yet.

Alright, so before anything else, let's just check if the two loose rubber thingies will actually attach to the fastener up top.



Yep! All right, good. So what exactly are we looking at here?



Left to right; fuel pump, fuel filter, fuel accumulator, all covered in generous amounts of grease and oil and stuff.

Between the filter and accumulator is a plastic bracket, obviously designed to secure a line. Which line is sort of hard to make out; there are several candidates, none obvious.



There's also this thing; a rigid steel line connecting the three components. This is what it's supposed to look like...

That, along with the bracket holding everything together, feels pretty solid, but it looks pretty rusted and terrible. The rust has also fused a lot of this stuff together, and I'm not sure I'll be able to loosen everything I need without breaking stuff. I did manage to clean off a lot of grime though; enough to actually see the parts number for the accumulator!



Couldn't make out much more, though, except for a date on the fuel filter from 17 years ago. The fuel pump might very well be a factory part for all I know.

I've had to apply penetrating oil (should update the thread title to that, really) and hope that loosens things up a bit, but I'm leaning towards just trying to source a brand new bracket and buying that connecting steel line. Might switch out the fuel pump while I'm at it; there's no way it's any newer than the filter, and I guess those things have finite service lives as well.

All in all, it could have been worse! Now to apply more penetrating oil.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





You've got a set of line wrenches, right? They'll be your only hope at dismantling that without destroying that pipe.

Even then, I don't like the odds.

meltie
Nov 9, 2003

Not a sodding fridge.

IOwnCalculus posted:

You've got a set of line wrenches, right? They'll be your only hope at dismantling that without destroying that pipe.

Even then, I don't like the odds.

Yeah, good job in securing it (wtf!!), but I wouldn't crack into it speculatively unless you're sure you need to.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Thanks, yeah, I'd like a line wrench or five, but they seem strangely hard to come by around here. I've been to several shops specializing in high-end tools of all kinds, but none of them knew what I was even talking about. Might be because everything tool-related in these parts is rigged towards construction or industry, and nothing at all towards automotive work.

But then I also placed a call to my parts shop not ten minutes after the previous post, and placed an order for pretty much everything down there.

The accumulator can stay, because I can't imagine an accumulator ever wearing out. But other than that, I'm just replacing every bolt, nut and rubber sleeve in the whole bloody assembly. I don't want those antediluvian rubber rings to suddenly snap on me, and I'm all too aware that I'm... about to break that poor metal fuel line. As luck would have it, almost everything is even available, at more or less reasonable prices. The only part that might be a problem is the actual cradle itself. I'll know the answer next week, but if not, I think the old one can be sandblasted back to fighting form.

The most expensive part, at around $250, is the fuel pump. I know my old one might still be good, but on the other hand it's ancient, it's been swingin' freely down there for who knows how long, it looks like it's been through hell, and I've never liked the sound it makes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToLsIJtfnj0

So while this might be called throwing parts at the problem, even if it fixes nothing, I'm writing it up as preventive maintenance

Seat Safety Switch
May 27, 2008

MY RELIGION IS THE SMALL BLOCK V8 AND COMMANDMENTS ONE THROUGH TEN ARE NEVER LIFT.



Pillbug

How is the IACV so expensive? Can you get another wrecked one to tear open and maybe rebuild?

Or even adapt another car's IACV to it.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

Seat Safety Switch posted:

How is the IACV so expensive? Can you get another wrecked one to tear open and maybe rebuild?

Or even adapt another car's IACV to it.

I have no idea why. It's probably in part due to our currency plummeting (yaaay overly oil-dependent economy), but even that can't explain the massive jump. Everyone I've asked for a quote got that worried, confused look on their faces when their systems came up with a figure, and they're as in the dark as me. And it's, like, just that one part, too. Rebuilt or refurbished ones start at $2-300, but since the symptoms of it being bad have died down a little, I'll cross my fingers and wait a little while longer; I'm very excited to see what new plug wires and fuel bits might result in.

meltie
Nov 9, 2003

Not a sodding fridge.

Pursesnatcher posted:

I have no idea why. It's probably in part due to our currency plummeting (yaaay overly oil-dependent economy), but even that can't explain the massive jump. Everyone I've asked for a quote got that worried, confused look on their faces when their systems came up with a figure, and they're as in the dark as me. And it's, like, just that one part, too. Rebuilt or refurbished ones start at $2-300, but since the symptoms of it being bad have died down a little, I'll cross my fingers and wait a little while longer; I'm very excited to see what new plug wires and fuel bits might result in.

Have you tried Bosch Classic directly? http://www.bosch-classic.com/en/int...e/produkte.html

Suburban Dad
Jan 10, 2007



I know them as flare wrenches, maybe try using that terminology and see if you still get weird looks.

Humbug
Dec 3, 2006
Bogus

Would these do the trick? Seems available in most of the shops. https://www.biltema.no/verktoy/hand...apen-2000023061

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer


Nah, I'd sort of given up on them after my previous couple of attempts went without even an answer. But it's a good idea, and I guess I should try!

Humbug posted:

Would these do the trick? Seems available in most of the shops. https://www.biltema.no/verktoy/hand...apen-2000023061

Huh! So that's what they're called here. I've tried explaining both how they look and what they're used for, but I didn't know the name in Norwegian. And when neither Tools nor Würth nor the standalone shops around here could help, Biltema never crossed my mind. Guess I know where I'm going today!

Oh and some digging through wrecker databases yielded awesome results as far as the bracket is concerned. I've found two whole assemblies of both filter, pump and accumulator, complete in bracket, each at less than $100! Which really just means new bracket at less than $100, with a spare old pump and accumulator in case of poo poo.

meltie
Nov 9, 2003

Not a sodding fridge.

Have you had the IACV off and tested it to know if it's dead or not? There'll be a procedure in the book; it'll be something like "apply 12V to the pins and try and blow through it".

Pursesnatcher posted:

Quick update; tubes have arrived, so time to get that IACV sorted.



If you need to replace it: US $89.90 apparently new, and guaranteed by the seller for a year...
https://www.ebay.com/itm/1986-1991-...5-/233487409406

meltie fucked around with this message at 13:40 on Apr 25, 2020

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb


Sounds perfectly normal to me. If it's anything like the other Bosch fuel pumps I've messed with, the pump mechanism is metal rollers in a plate that is spun by the motor. I guess it's called a roller cell pump. If you change it anyway, save that one as a backup.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

meltie posted:

Have you had the IACV off and tested it to know if it's dead or not? There'll be a procedure in the book; it'll be something like "apply 12V to the pins and try and blow through it".

If you need to replace it: US $89.90 apparently new, and guaranteed by the seller for a year...
https://www.ebay.com/itm/1986-1991-...5-/233487409406

Apparently my model needs a dwell meter to test properly because it's CIS. But I did ask the shop to test it, and they confirmed it was broken. I'm a bit wary of looks-like-Chinesium parts, too... but it's not a critical error, not at this time.

LloydDobler posted:

Sounds perfectly normal to me. If it's anything like the other Bosch fuel pumps I've messed with, the pump mechanism is metal rollers in a plate that is spun by the motor. I guess it's called a roller cell pump. If you change it anyway, save that one as a backup.

Really? I've just never heard a fuel pump as continuously loud and angry before. Even with everything assembled, that's the noise I hear when sitting in the driver seat, at least if I open the window a little. But I'm keeping pretty much everything I remove, even things that are clearly broken, in case I get a chance to refurbish them later.

Tomarse
Mar 7, 2001

Grr

The similar model and period bosch fuel pump in my Saab 99 made that sort of noise.
Don't bank on the accumulator not needing replacement too if its like the Saab one - the Saab ones leak when old (and are positioned above the exhaust silencer which is nice).
Good luck separating it all - please start hosing it down with penetrating oil now!

Saab also used the same design IACV. I'm having CIS flashbacks... I am sure the ones I have tested in the past have just been straight "Apply 12v and see if it you can then blow/spray brake cleaner through it" tests. Its only got 2 wires hasn't it? I don't think CIS over-complicated this part!

I searched and found This IAC which is 80EUR and claims to be german manufactured.

Tomarse fucked around with this message at 08:51 on May 2, 2020

LloydDobler
Oct 15, 2005

You shared it with a dick.



Cybernetic Crumb

Pursesnatcher posted:

Really? I've just never heard a fuel pump as continuously loud and angry before. Even with everything assembled, that's the noise I hear when sitting in the driver seat, at least if I open the window a little. But I'm keeping pretty much everything I remove, even things that are clearly broken, in case I get a chance to refurbish them later.

Yeah, in certain 80's volvos, the pump primes to build pressure the second you turn the key. The first test when diagnosing a starting problem is "do you hear the fuel pump when you turn the key? (you might have to open the door)". It was right in front of the driver's side rear wheel and loud as gently caress. Like I said, replace it if you want but if it makes full pressure it's useable.

Pursesnatcher
Oct 23, 2016



Grimey Drawer

LloydDobler posted:

Yeah, in certain 80's volvos, the pump primes to build pressure the second you turn the key. The first test when diagnosing a starting problem is "do you hear the fuel pump when you turn the key? (you might have to open the door)". It was right in front of the driver's side rear wheel and loud as gently caress. Like I said, replace it if you want but if it makes full pressure it's useable.

I knew that they were loud when priming, but I had no idea they were supposed to be screaming like that all the time. Exciting... yeah, I'll definitely be keeping it around.

Tomarse posted:

I searched and found This IAC which is 80EUR and claims to be german manufactured.

Oh, now this is some interesting stuff! Löwe should be trustworthy, and while almost suspiciously cheap, it's much more in line with what it should cost to make one of these little bad boys. Thank you!

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Grakkus
Sep 4, 2011



I've had a couple of Mercs from that generation and the pump has always been whisper-quiet in them except when priming

The fuel pump assembly was leaking on my Merc last year as well, I was advised to just replace the whole thing with a used unit as they are pretty reliable, I did so (just put a new fuel filter on) and it has indeed been fine.

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