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nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



How much will I regret getting my dad a Lexmark CS410dn color duplex laser? He's going to be printing drafts of books so possibly print cycles of several hundred pages at a time. The duplex feature is a requirement, color is optional, budget including toner for the first ~3000 pages (B/W) is 300.

Edit: Another option is Brother HL-L2310D, which is monochrome.

nielsm fucked around with this message at 14:10 on Feb 9, 2020

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nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



Thanks Ants posted:

The running costs on small colour lasers are ridiculous - stick with monochrome models that have large capacity toner options.

That's a good point.

Looked a bit more, and think I'm going to suggest my dad the Brother HL-L2375DW then. I'm guessing it's a newer model than HL-L2310D.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



Wireless printing typically means specific support for printing from tablets and phones (Android and iOS), and it might mean the printer is able to act as a wifi access point, or perhaps some Bluetooth protocol I'm not sure whether exists or not.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



Whatever you do, do not buy an ink jet.
You won't get a great color laser at that price, but they will still be more reliable than any ink-based printer.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



If the color is mainly for printing patterns for costume making (i.e. line art) then the color accuracy and resolution probably isn't a major issue. As long as you can tell magenta from cyan it should be fine?

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



I don't know the name of any specific software, but the way to handle it is usually to have some separator pages with some kind of bar code printed, that instructs the software how to split or where to save the following pages.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



klosterdev posted:

We're moving towards a VPNless user environment, and have recently implemented a managed printer setup where the user prints to a virtual printer and then can release the job from any on-site printer. As such, when working from home, a user will have to wait until they're on-site to be able to send the jobs to the virtual printer because it will fail if Windows can't see the print server.

Is there any known way where a user could send a print job in a way that within Windows the job remains in a holding pattern until the next time the print server is visible to Windows (when connected to the cooperate network on-site) and then spits out all the jobs to it?

Comedy homebrew option: PDF printer that dumps every print job to a secret directory on the PC, and a background task that tries to copy those PDFs to a file share or upload them to a web service. (Except a commercial solution would be the same, just there exists someone else to point at when it doesn't work.)

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



skylined! posted:

Also looking for printer recommendations, my 8 year old dell cdc00f is making GBS threads the bed and giving an unresolvable error. Most of what we print at home is B&W shipping labels/receipts, and my wife has shown interest in printing photos recently..

Those are two opposite requirements. Occasional B&W text printing is by far best solved by a laser printer. Laser printers also are far superior for infrequent printing since there's no liquid ink that can dry out.
Photo printing requires an ink jet printer to get good results. You also need to be printing a lot, and invest in a good model, for it to be economical over going to a professional print shop.

Well, an ink jet printer that often gets used for photo printing could also be used just fine for occasional B&W text printing.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



That's exactly the purpose of those sponges, to collect ink when the printer runs a nozzle cleaning cycle. (This is where all your expensive ink gets wasted, it gets blown out into a sponge to keep the nozzles clean.)

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



Ink is much more expensive than toner. Ink dries out, toner does not. A toner cartridge will last for 5k-10k pages, that's probably two years use. An ink cartridge with the same page capacity would dry out before it was used up at that rate.

Even a small printer will usually have a tray and a manual feed, the tray can then be loaded with A4 and you can use the manual feed for A5 forms.

Consider handling the faxing with an IP fax service operated from PC, rather than via a dedicated device, it will probably turn out cheaper and more reliable.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



For medical photos, you could actually consider the Canon Selphy line of photo printers. They're bad for everything else but photos, but they should be great quality for those, and the supply packs (integrated paper and dye) have a well-known print capacity and don't go bad from staying unused either.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



There's some talk about serious photo printers here: The Dorkroom Just Print - Inflicting your lovely pictures onto the physical world

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



I would assume that inkjets that officially support refill still have the same issue all other inkjets have, with ink drying out and clogging up nozzles if you don't print every few days at least. If that's not a problem for you, feel free to try it out. Epson even appears to have a few models of their EcoTank line priced around the same as basic b/w lasers.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



If you're sending business letters, you could also consider using windowed envelopes, so you just need to print the recipient address in the appropriate space on your actual letter. The envelope will only need postage then, no printing and no labels on it.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



I can imagine that discrete scanners might mostly fall into two categories now, business document scanners designed to feed reams of documents through fast, and artwork scanners for high quality art/photo reproduction.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



Adobe Acrobat Reader has at least in the past had an option for PDF printing that rasterizes the document on the computer instead of letting the printer do that. It generally makes printing slower (because it has to transfer huge full-page bitmaps) but it does work around almost any weird printer PostScript interpreter issue.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



On the other hand, Epson is actually heavily pushing their EcoTank line where you don't buy cartridges with integrated nozzles and electronics, and instead only buy ink refills for an internal tank. They also don't really have any super budget inkjets like the HP subsidized-by-cart-subscriptions models you see pushed everywhere.

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



One (other) advantage of inkjet printers should be that the paper path is (can be) much simpler than in laser printers. The paper just needs to be pulled in, run past the print head, and out, unlike laser printers that need it going through 2-3 different integrated units (imaging, toner, fuser) each with their own paper feed mechanisms, in addition to the ones in the printer itself. Much fewer places a paper jam can occur, and much easier to resolve when it does happen.

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nielsm
Jun 1, 2009



If you only need to print once in a blue moon, do check if there's a print shop nearby you can use instead of owning another machine.

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