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diadem
Sep 20, 2003
eet bugz

If a United States citizen is engaged to a Chinese citizen who is currently on an OPT VISA, and the United States government takes too long to process the K1 VISA, thereby forcing them to leave their home and sell their house, what countries would accept both of them? (Assuming they are both at the top of their field, opening up things like EU Blue).

Both are loyal to their respective countries and neither would ever renounce their citizenship.

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Dance Officer
May 4, 2017


I'd say it depends on whether you want/need to have a job. Lots of countries are willing to let you stay for a number of years as long as you're living off your own dime, no first world country (and probably second world as well) will just take you if you need work and don't have a job lined up prior to moving there.

peanut
Sep 9, 2007



Japan, HK, Singapore.

a_good_username
Mar 13, 2018


My impression is that you should be good to go in most EU countries if you're able to get an employment offer at a wage decently higher than the national average. Same w/ most countries really.

Singapore is a particularly good recommendation if you never want to actually get citizenship in the place you've moved to.

Minclark
Dec 24, 2013


peanut posted:

Japan, HK, Singapore.

Chinese mainlanders need a visa to get to HK. This visa can be difficult to get depending on the persons circumstances. In my case my wife was stopped and had to wait for me catch the bus and cross into the mainland.

Most Chinese I have ever met hate Japan. It could be a regional thing though I spend most of my time near Nanyang. They usually reference this
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Sino-Japanese_War

I spent some time in Beijing and ended up at this place once. It was should to shoulder packed and from what I picked up parents explaining things to kids were not being friendly about the Japanese. Chinese have their own curse word for Japanese. I was also made to remove my sun hat because it was of Japanese design and it made people dislike me. So I Switched to a Chinese sunhat and I was back to being famous for being white.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Museu...nese_Aggression

Check with the Chinese side of this relationship before saying you want to move there.

That being said Singapore sounds great! (don't know quite as much about there)

peanut
Sep 9, 2007



Otoh I live in Japan and there's loads of Chinese citizens here busting their asses to avoid returning to China.

fart simpson
Jul 2, 2005



Lipstick Apathy

peanut posted:

Otoh I live in Japan

lol

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pim01
Oct 22, 2002



Minclark posted:

That being said Singapore sounds great! (don't know quite as much about there)

Singapore is a great place to live as long as a) your employer is willing to sponsor your employment pass or permanent residency (not really actually permanent) and b) the magic and invisible government quota for the number of non-singaporeans your company employs doesnt change, booting you out.

We have a large-ish office in Singapore where a lot of people come from outside the country, and all of them have a period of uncertainty every few years when it comes to renewal of their EP or PR. If you have kids, it gets more complex - they don't inherit your status (so you might be allowed to stay, but your kids not. Fun!) and school places are generally hard to get unless you pay for private school.

You can get citizenship, but it takes years and years of living in SG and i'n the case of China you'd have to give up your Chinese citizenship. A couple of friends have gone through it and it's quite a long and involved process.

I spent a year in the country on secondment and would happily go back again - but only with a good strong company backing me (and paying the 4k sing dollar monthly rent)

a_good_username posted:

Singapore is a particularly good recommendation if you never want to actually get citizenship in the place you've moved to.

This, basically

pim01 fucked around with this message at Aug 4, 2018 around 16:42

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