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refleks
Nov 21, 2006




ringu0 posted:

Backblaze B2?

I don't have any experience with them, but I heard good things about them, and I'm going to try using them as a backup for my photos.

Yeah, that was another option I was looking at.

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ringu0
Feb 24, 2013




refleks posted:

Yeah, that was another option I was looking at.

For more options you can read thewirecutter's review if you didn't do it already: https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/b...backup-service/

Alpha Mayo
Jan 15, 2007
hi how are you?
there was this racist piece of shit in your av so I fixed it
you're welcome
pay it forward~

I know OP says Cloud Sync clients are a bad idea, but would duplicati + Dropbox Business be OK?

nielsm
Jun 1, 2009




Fallen Rib

As in using Dropbox Business as a backup destination, so the working copy of your data is not directly synced to the Dropbox account? It would probably work but I'm not sure if it's really economical for sufficiently large volumes of data.

Pablo Bluth
Sep 7, 2007

I've made a huge mistake.


It's pretty obscure but I stumbled across Hardlinkbackup which finally scratched my itch for a hardlink based backup solution on Windows. Versioning with minimum overheads and the ability to delete any particular backup without breaking anything else.

MikeJF
Dec 20, 2003





TheFluff posted:

I've seen Arq come highly recommended as an alternative to Duplicati - seems to do mostly the same thing but is commercial ($50) with support. Seems a good bit more user friendly than Duplicati (which can involve a fair bit of computer janitoring).

Is Arq more durable than Duplicati? I've been using Duplicati+B2 to back up the family PC and it seems to succeed in actually backing up about once a month or less; otherwise it trips over at the slightest sleep event or network hiccup.

TheFluff
Dec 13, 2006

FRIENDS, LISTEN TO ME
I AM A SEAGULL
OF WEALTH AND TASTE


Slippery Tilde

MikeJF posted:

Is Arq more durable than Duplicati? I've been using Duplicati+B2 to back up the family PC and it seems to succeed in actually backing up about once a month or less; otherwise it trips over at the slightest sleep event or network hiccup.

I don't know, I've never tried it - Duplicati works well enough for me. On my machine the main backup set is around 120GB, but the backup job only takes 3-4 minutes (runs every six hours). The initial backup took a while, but the incrementals are really fast. I back up to Google Cloud Storage though and I have gigabit internet, so both upload and download are pretty fast. The log for my last backup event says it downloaded around 1.2 GB and uploaded around 450 MB, so maybe if your internet connection is slow that's what's making it take forever?

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



I haven't used CrashPlan in years and seems to be a completely different setup since I last used them. Is starting the process new supposed to be the most glacial thing ever? I've been sat at the 'preparing for backup' stage for an hour or two, and it's counting down 230k~ files or so incredibly slowly... but doesn't appear to be actually doing anything. I'm in MacOS and activity monitor says it's not using any CPU cycles, barely any RAM, and a grand total of 500mb read by the application. I know lots of small files are often pretty slow, but this is beyond that... the trial will be over before it even does anything!

Mr.Radar
Nov 5, 2005

You guys aren't going to believe this, but that guy is our games teacher.


Taco Defender

Edit: can't read.

Hed
Mar 31, 2004



Fun Shoe

EL BROMANCE posted:

I haven't used CrashPlan in years and seems to be a completely different setup since I last used them. Is starting the process new supposed to be the most glacial thing ever? I've been sat at the 'preparing for backup' stage for an hour or two, and it's counting down 230k~ files or so incredibly slowly... but doesn't appear to be actually doing anything. I'm in MacOS and activity monitor says it's not using any CPU cycles, barely any RAM, and a grand total of 500mb read by the application. I know lots of small files are often pretty slow, but this is beyond that... the trial will be over before it even does anything!

Itís been a year or so since I kicked it off but depending on the number of files thereís some JVM flags you need to set to get better performance.

Their client is a pig and one of the main reasons I got off it.

EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006

COWABUNGA DUDES!



Had a feeling despite all the changes, that Java would still be brewing underneath it all. I know it's been bugging me to update so I"ll do that now and see if that helps at all.

File count 235,073 at 1:10 then 235,242 at 3:18. Sometimes number goes up, sometimes goes down. Complete lack of feedback on what it's doing is what's annoying me.

e:

Updated JVM, rebooted machine, CrashPlan still sitting there the same way. Decided to start from scratch and isolated a single folder with 9 items in it at 200mb to backup. CrashPlan restarts, sees 9,000 files and decides they take up 1.4gb. Still isn't loving doing anything. Like, seriously?

EL BROMANCE fucked around with this message at 20:12 on Aug 30, 2019

WattsvilleBlues
Jan 25, 2005

Every demon wants his pound of flesh

Is Carbonite still a thing in the UK?

YarPirate
May 17, 2003
Hellion

Anyone have any recommendations for backups that meet the following?:

1. Local appliance
2. Management portal (think 1000+ of these appliances being deployed)
3. Scheduled DR testing

Don't say the following:

Unitrends
Veeam

Depending on the result your recommendation may earn you a case of beer.

Thanks!

Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless You Ants, Blants



Fun Shoe

Not a recommendation as we never ended up progressing with the project, but Barracuda make appliances with central management that on paper do what you want.

Honj Steak
May 31, 2013

Hi there.


Backblaze Personal Backup now comes with the option for a 365-day file history!

Erwin
Feb 17, 2006



YarPirate posted:

Anyone have any recommendations for backups that meet the following?:

1. Local appliance
2. Management portal (think 1000+ of these appliances being deployed)
3. Scheduled DR testing

Don't say the following:

Unitrends
Veeam

Depending on the result your recommendation may earn you a case of beer.

Thanks!

Is EMC Avamar still a thing?

skooma512
Feb 8, 2012

You couldn't grok my race car, but you dug the roadside blur.


Is Duplicati + B2 still a good solution or should I consider another client?

I like Duplicati but I've been having an issue with one of my backup jobs. It keeps throwing errors for no good reason. Since I'm looking at it anyway has there been anything cool and good coming out in the last couple years that I missed or is it still the best?

Skarsnik
Oct 21, 2008

I...AM...RUUUDE!






Slippery Tilde

Working for me still

You tried asking about the errors on the forum? Everyone on there is pretty responsive

DEUSFORORUM
Aug 28, 2003


Since I am stuck at home, I have been going through my old poor attempts at saving old files. I have images of a bunch of old hard drives with nothing sorted or pulled out. Is there a good tool that can go through and image and only remove unique files, preferably none operating system files. Then I would like to go through and de-duplicate all of those files so I don't have multiple copies of the same ones. If nothing else, a tool that can grab all of the pictures and videos may be a good start since I think that is the majority of what needs saved.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

~this is me posting irl~


I need to set my mother's computer up to automatically backup files (photos, documents, etc) to an external drive. She's running Windows 10. Is the Windows built-in backup tool a good option or should I look at other software?


Internet backup services are not an option because her internet connection's upstream is way too slow.

Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless You Ants, Blants



Fun Shoe

Backing up to an external drive is fine for the built-in tool. I'd try and encourage disconnecting the USB disk periodically just in case the PC gets hit with a surge, ransomware etc.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

~this is me posting irl~


What about having her swap in an alternate drive periodically? Would I need to (or be able to) setup a second backup job that points to the other drive?

Klyith
Aug 3, 2007

GBS Pledge Week


I got a little WD 1TB laptop-size external drive for my mom and found that the basic backup software made by WD that comes with the drive was totally suitable for backing up a mom-PC. It's better designed for a once/twice a month plug-in-and-backup than windows file history, which means the drive sits unpowered in a drawer 99% of the time and is immune to malware. And the default settings were good for someone who keeps all their data in the normal user profile folders, plus it keeps file version history.

If your mom is like mine and will reliably do a thing if she puts it on a calendar, I can recommend that.

Methylethylaldehyde
Oct 23, 2004

BAKA BAKA


Farmer Crack-rear end posted:

What about having her swap in an alternate drive periodically? Would I need to (or be able to) setup a second backup job that points to the other drive?

Never do this, because it never happens. I tried that, it never worked, as they always forgot about it. A cloud backup is probably the fastest/easiest way to just get it all backed up.

Pablo Bluth
Sep 7, 2007

I've made a huge mistake.


Farmer Crack-rear end posted:

What about having her swap in an alternate drive periodically? Would I need to (or be able to) setup a second backup job that points to the other drive?
Good backup practice is to have at least one off-site backup (house fire, etc) so at the least swap one out when you visit and take it home.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

~this is me posting irl~


Methylethylaldehyde posted:

Never do this, because it never happens. I tried that, it never worked, as they always forgot about it. A cloud backup is probably the fastest/easiest way to just get it all backed up.

Under other circumstances I would happily just let an internet backup service handle it, but her DSL connection's upstream is way too slow to rely on, especially as she doesn't like leaving her computer on unless she's using it.


Pablo Bluth posted:

Good backup practice is to have at least one off-site backup (house fire, etc) so at the least swap one out when you visit and take it home.

Yeah, I was hoping for a least-effort solution on my part, but I guess it'd make sense for me to handle that.


Klyith posted:

I got a little WD 1TB laptop-size external drive for my mom and found that the basic backup software made by WD that comes with the drive was totally suitable for backing up a mom-PC. It's better designed for a once/twice a month plug-in-and-backup than windows file history, which means the drive sits unpowered in a drawer 99% of the time and is immune to malware. And the default settings were good for someone who keeps all their data in the normal user profile folders, plus it keeps file version history.

If your mom is like mine and will reliably do a thing if she puts it on a calendar, I can recommend that.

Oh neat! I already bought one of those so maybe I'll go with that.



Thanks for your responses!

WattsvilleBlues
Jan 25, 2005

Every demon wants his pound of flesh

Is Carbonite a good option for cloud backup?

Klyith
Aug 3, 2007

GBS Pledge Week


Farmer Crack-rear end posted:

Yeah, I was hoping for a least-effort solution on my part, but I guess it'd make sense for me to handle that.

Yeah if you want to provide off-site backups, bring a big USB stick when you visit and just do a one-off manual copy yourself.

Trying to do full business level "best practice" backups for a parent is kinda silly imo. Rotating drives and stuff is just adding to the mental burden; the idea for backups with normal non-technical people is a simple solution with few steps or things to remember. The most common losses are from a hardware failure, laptop lost or stolen, and malware.

Farmer Crack-rear end posted:

Oh neat! I already bought one of those so maybe I'll go with that.

The only downside is it's not a full image backup like some other software, so if my mom does get malware'd my instructions will probably be for her to bring it to a local PC shop to get it wiped and reinstalled, then restore the backups. Versus stuff like acronis where you can make a bootable stick and restore an image directly.

Farmer Crack-Ass
Jan 2, 2001

~this is me posting irl~


Klyith posted:

Trying to do full business level "best practice" backups for a parent is kinda silly imo. Rotating drives and stuff is just adding to the mental burden; the idea for backups with normal non-technical people is a simple solution with few steps or things to remember. The most common losses are from a hardware failure, laptop lost or stolen, and malware.

My hope was to have it automatic such that the only effort involved on her part would be to occasionally unplug the drive and plug in the other one.

Methylethylaldehyde
Oct 23, 2004

BAKA BAKA


Farmer Crack-rear end posted:

Under other circumstances I would happily just let an internet backup service handle it, but her DSL connection's upstream is way too slow to rely on, especially as she doesn't like leaving her computer on unless she's using it.

I know at least one of the backup places lets you pre-seed the backup from a HDD they mail you.

Discussion Quorum
Dec 5, 2002
Armchair Philistine


I'm trying to set up my home backup system and the options are making my head swim a bit in terms of how they might interact or interfere with each other.

Here is the setup: I want to have the various computers in the house backing up to the Synology NAS, and the NAS backing up those backups, as well as some centrally stored data, to a cloud service (B2, Glacier, Wasabi, etc.). Being able to centrally manage would be nice as well, as would having the same system across Windows and Linux clients. I want to get this as close to "set it and forget it" as possible and will tolerate extra up-front computer touching to make it happen.

I think using Veeam to back up the PCs to a network share on the NAS, and then using Hyperbackup on the NAS to push everything into the cloud, is the way to go - but am I going to run into issues of these services stepping on each other? Should I stick to something "dumber" for the first step (say rsync) and use NAS btrfs snapshots+HyperBackup to handle deduplication and versioning locally and in the cloud?

Decairn
Dec 1, 2007



Discussion Quorum posted:

I'm trying to set up my home backup system and the options are making my head swim a bit in terms of how they might interact or interfere with each other.

Here is the setup: I want to have the various computers in the house backing up to the Synology NAS, and the NAS backing up those backups, as well as some centrally stored data, to a cloud service (B2, Glacier, Wasabi, etc.). Being able to centrally manage would be nice as well, as would having the same system across Windows and Linux clients. I want to get this as close to "set it and forget it" as possible and will tolerate extra up-front computer touching to make it happen.

I think using Veeam to back up the PCs to a network share on the NAS, and then using Hyperbackup on the NAS to push everything into the cloud, is the way to go - but am I going to run into issues of these services stepping on each other? Should I stick to something "dumber" for the first step (say rsync) and use NAS btrfs snapshots+HyperBackup to handle deduplication and versioning locally and in the cloud?

You're on the right track, any of those would work. I use Active Backup for Business to backup each PC to NAS as well as an RPi with Linux, it does de-duplication and is a full drive/system backup. Then to cloud, Hyperbackup to Wasabi (which for me was the most economical and twice the speed as Synology C2 due to where the data centers are located). I had tried btrfs snapshots but it's a bit overkill and not as straightforward as I hoped to setup and maintain.

skooma512
Feb 8, 2012

You couldn't grok my race car, but you dug the roadside blur.


Test the restore is right. I just realized I may not even remember the passwords for my personal backups or be able to execute the restore.


I certainly can't set up the backups correctly again in Duplicati. I built a new PC a few months ago. Haven't gotten around to setting up again till now and that's gonna be a whole thing.


Next time I get a spurt of motivation for PC backups, I should write my own recovery manual. I don't use it enough to retain the info the long lengths of time between setups.

klosterdev
Oct 10, 2006

Na na na na na na na na Batman!

nielsm posted:

CLOUD SYNC SERVICES ARE NOT BACKUP! (Dropbox, OneDrive, and the like.) They have the same problem that changes synchronize, and it's often possible for an attacker to intentionally destroy your online data. It typically also only syncs data under a specific folder, not anything you choose.

This I don't get, at least in terms of SharePoint Online. I've had two different MS techs tell me on the phone and in writing that there isn't a need to have a backup if our files are on SharePoint Online, and that as long we let them know within 30 days, they should be able to get our data back. They also describe in https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb...&rs=en-gb&ad=gb

quote:

If lots of your SharePoint or Microsoft Teams files get deleted, overwritten, corrupted, or infected by malware, you can restore an entire shared document library to a previous time. The restore will undo all the actions that occurred on both files and folders in the last 30 days.

They also describe in their data resiliency page https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/of...liency-overview

quote:

- Copies of customer data must be separated into different fault zones or as many fault domains as possible (e.g., datacenters, accessible by single credentials (process, server, or operator)) to provide failure isolation.
- Critical customer data must be monitored for failing any part of Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability (ACID).
- Customer data must be protected from corruption. It must be actively scanned or monitored, repairable, and recoverable.
- Most data loss results from customer actions, so allow customers to recover on their own using a GUI that enables them to restore accidentally deleted items.

Is there anything I'm missing that would leave SharePoint Online vulnerable to losing our data?

thebigcow
Jan 3, 2001

Bully!

If you only have one copy, you have no backup. If you have a file on three devices but run software that aggressively synchronizes them you only have one copy.

Klyith
Aug 3, 2007

GBS Pledge Week


skooma512 posted:

Test the restore is right. I just realized I may not even remember the passwords for my personal backups or be able to execute the restore.


I certainly can't set up the backups correctly again in Duplicati. I built a new PC a few months ago. Haven't gotten around to setting up again till now and that's gonna be a whole thing.


Next time I get a spurt of motivation for PC backups, I should write my own recovery manual. I don't use it enough to retain the info the long lengths of time between setups.

This is 100% why I decided duplicati was too complex and needed more janitoring than I want to deal with. As much as automatic backups that preserve stuff in near real time to minimize gaps between backup and disaster is a laudable goal, it just wasn't worth the part where recovery is potentially complicated and backups seem to be specific to a PC / not always portable. I've been using the same file structure to store stuff for like 2 decades, I got files with last modified dates in 1999. I want my backup system to have that type of longevity.


As for remembering the password on your backups, if you aren't using a password manager that's another thing you should fix -- maybe even with higher priority than the backups.



klosterdev posted:

Is there anything I'm missing that would leave SharePoint Online vulnerable to losing our data?

Dropbox, OneDrive, and Gdrive don't have guaranteed previous version availability which is why they're not a backup.

If sharepoint does that covers the biggest objection (synching garbage that overwrites your data). However, if this is critical business data you still have potential loss if something happens and you don't notice for 30 days.

skooma512
Feb 8, 2012

You couldn't grok my race car, but you dug the roadside blur.


Klyith posted:

This is 100% why I decided duplicati was too complex and needed more janitoring than I want to deal with. As much as automatic backups that preserve stuff in near real time to minimize gaps between backup and disaster is a laudable goal, it just wasn't worth the part where recovery is potentially complicated and backups seem to be specific to a PC / not always portable. I've been using the same file structure to store stuff for like 2 decades, I got files with last modified dates in 1999. I want my backup system to have that type of longevity.


As for remembering the password on your backups, if you aren't using a password manager that's another thing you should fix -- maybe even with higher priority than the backups.


Oh I use Bitwarden, but I forget to put the passwords in there.

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klosterdev
Oct 10, 2006

Na na na na na na na na Batman!

Klyith posted:

However, if this is critical business data you still have potential loss if something happens and you don't notice for 30 days.

It's honestly a huge improvement over what we had before. Our backups only incremented for 7 days and were literally using USB 2.0 WD HDDs plugged into any server not at HQ. HQ's backed up to a stupid-old SAN. And when were got crypto'd we lost most of the HQ backups because manager never tested the backups and fought testing them when pushed.

Weirdly enough most of our remote sites were recoverable, I suspect because those USB drives were all failing and their seek times were so bad there wouldn't have been time to encrypt them before everything got shut down.

Meanwhile the site I piloted migrating to SharePoint Online a week before had all their data accessible throughout the whole ordeal. Wasn't a headache and a half to get people to agree to migrate to SO after that, even if the ransomware was propagating via SMB.

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