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staple remover
Oct 9, 2018

by FactsAreUseless


I find the whole concept loving fascinating but unfortunately I know little of chemistry and I'm wondering if anyone on these forums could chime in with some interesting information.

It's so crazy to me that there are these "secret" building blocks of reality that have maybe never existed inside of labs. Could they form naturally somewhere? How high do they potentially go? What would they look like or do if you could somehow form a visible block of them, even if for a fraction of a second? Does this theoretical "island of stability" mean that we could potentially have never before seen forms of matter in the future that would do crazy things? Anything else cool?

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A Wizard of Goatse
Dec 14, 2014

What the fuck am I even saying?


IIRC the island of stability isotopes are "stable" in the sense they might have a half-life of like ten seconds, vs. a few milliseconds. They might occur naturally inside stars or something, but not for very long?

Neutrino
Mar 8, 2006



Fallen Rib

Seriously, what does it matter?

staple remover
Oct 9, 2018

by FactsAreUseless


A Wizard of Goatse posted:

IIRC the island of stability isotopes are "stable" in the sense they might have a half-life of like ten seconds, vs. a few milliseconds. They might occur naturally inside stars or something, but not for very long?

I think I read somewhere it could possibly be up to days

My Linux Rig
Mar 27, 2010

Cat Army
2nd Battalion


speaking of manmade elements, aren't they making like super atoms now where they're like two atoms stuck so closely together that they behave like one

I heard it on skeptics guide but never found anything

I never really understood how it worked either

RobattoJesus
Aug 13, 2002



Meitnerium is my favorite superheavy element because it's named after a woman who got hosed over for a nobel prize by a bunch of dudes and then people named an element after her out of spite for those dudes, and I enjoy my science to have a bit of spite in it.

staple remover
Oct 9, 2018

by FactsAreUseless


My Linux Rig posted:

speaking of manmade elements, aren't they making like super atoms now where they're like two atoms stuck so closely together that they behave like one

I heard it on skeptics guide but never found anything

I never really understood how it worked either

woah, what the gently caress

RossMan4Life
Dec 18, 2002


RobattoJesus posted:

Meitnerium is my favorite superheavy element because it's named after a woman who got hosed over for a nobel prize by a bunch of dudes and then people named an element after her out of spite for those dudes, and I enjoy my science to have a bit of spite in it.

My favorite chemistry story is the chemist who dissolved his medal in aqua regia when the Nazis were invading and left the container in the lab, then reconstituted the medal after the war and had it recast.

Cubone
May 26, 2011

Because it never leaves its bedroom, no one has ever seen this poster's real face.

Yams Fan

in 8th grade we did a group project where you picked an element, researched it, and did a brief presentation on all the things about it

my partner wanted to do francium because "as soon as it exists, it explodes." I agreed that this was hilarious, and we quickly learned that this single fact is neither interesting enough nor hilarious enough to sustain a five minute presentation

My Linux Rig
Mar 27, 2010

Cat Army
2nd Battalion


staple remover posted:

woah, what the gently caress

yeah apparently by utilizing some laser stuff and/or something else, you can effectively stick the atom nuclei so close together that their electrons form a closed shell around it, giving it new properties

the last example I heard of was sticking aluminum atoms in a cluster for a jet fuel additive that doesn't degrade in the presence of oxygen

a bone to pick
Sep 14, 2011
I LOVE FYAD, IT IS A GREAT FORUM


Neutrino posted:

Seriously, what does it matter?

oh wow haven't seen a av + post combo as good as this in a while

Bogus Adventure
Jan 11, 2017

"When I started here all there was was lampshade warehouses and leather bars, the serious leather bars where you wouldn't get in unless you had a rubber ball stuffed in your mouth, the wine list was tattooed on the bartender's face. That kind of place."

-Bogus Adventure

RossMan4Life posted:

My favorite chemistry story is the chemist who dissolved his medal in aqua regia when the Nazis were invading and left the container in the lab, then reconstituted the medal after the war and had it recast.

Niels Bohr was hardcore af

Colonel Cancer
Sep 26, 2015

I thought it was time you had a new av so typed in random picture and this is what came up


Y'all need a wedgie.

The closest temperature to absolute zero, in the whole universe, was created on earth in a lab via lasers.

staple remover
Oct 9, 2018

by FactsAreUseless


Colonel Cancer posted:

Y'all need a wedgie.

The closest temperature to absolute zero, in the whole universe, was created on earth in a lab via lasers.

how do you know

Zil
Jun 4, 2011



College Slice

RobattoJesus posted:

Meitnerium is my favorite superheavy element because it's named after a woman who got hosed over for a nobel prize by a bunch of dudes and then people named an element after her out of spite for those dudes, and I enjoy my science to have a bit of spite in it.

Spite science is best science.

Mnoba
Jun 24, 2010


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nF5B13Y5taQ&t=7s

here's a channel to follow op, got to get past his accent a bit

staple remover
Oct 9, 2018

by FactsAreUseless


Mnoba posted:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nF5B13Y5taQ&t=7s

here's a channel to follow op, got to get past his accent a bit

thanks G

Chinatown
Sep 11, 2001

*Suck My Balls*

Grimey Drawer

the only superheavy element i know is the my gosh darn dick and BALLS

(USER WAS PUT ON PROBATION FOR THIS POST)

ChaseSP
Mar 25, 2013



What's even better is there's this superheavy island of stability way up in atomic weight where outside of it poo poo just instantly falls apart.

Schweinhund
Oct 23, 2004



The real periodic table stops at 100. Everything after that is scientists scamming people for funding.

staple remover
Oct 9, 2018

by FactsAreUseless


ChaseSP posted:

What's even better is there's this superheavy island of stability way up in atomic weight where outside of it poo poo just instantly falls apart.

like seriously what is this

it's as if god placed a secret area in the video game that is life only accessible by cheat codes and i want to see it

numberoneposter
Feb 19, 2014



i have a quantumn computer at home

staple remover
Oct 9, 2018

by FactsAreUseless


remember when you were 12 and there was the secret island in grand theft auto 3 that you could get to in the lovely biplane that was nearly impossible to control and had no real relevance to the game but you just had to loving see it because it was there

Zil
Jun 4, 2011



College Slice

Schweinhund posted:

The real periodic table stops at 100. Everything after that is scientists scamming people for funding.

You may or may not wake up with a cat's head in your bed.

Chinatown
Sep 11, 2001

*Suck My Balls*

Grimey Drawer

numberoneposter posted:

i have a quantumn computer at home

eat FRASCHE!!!

numberoneposter
Feb 19, 2014



i use my quantumn computer to play seinfeld reruns and hack the NSA's secret encrypted porno stash

My Linux Rig
Mar 27, 2010

Cat Army
2nd Battalion


staple remover posted:

remember when you were 12 and there was the secret island in grand theft auto 3 that you could get to in the lovely biplane that was nearly impossible to control and had no real relevance to the game but you just had to loving see it because it was there

this but it's the secret island in the n64 golden eye

Zeluth
May 12, 2001



Hair Elf

I have three rules of thumb never wait a second, I may be losing a thumb. It is part is pierodic table that I do not like.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fqGIpkp2NU

ChaseSP
Mar 25, 2013



Superheavy elements are basically the physicist equivalent of map hacking games to look for secrets.

staple remover
Oct 9, 2018

by FactsAreUseless


ChaseSP posted:

Superheavy elements are basically the physicist equivalent of map hacking games to look for secrets.

imagine you're an experimental chemist who dedicates your entire lovely life to making synthetic radioactive elements that decay in fractions of a millisecond with no reward other than half paragraph long wikipedia articles until you get to number 279 and it hangs around for like 3 seconds and clearly has "you wasted your time enjoyable human being lmao - signed, god" etched in it

My Linux Rig
Mar 27, 2010

Cat Army
2nd Battalion


staple remover posted:

imagine you're an experimental chemist who dedicates your entire lovely life to making synthetic radioactive elements that decay in fractions of a millisecond with no reward other than half paragraph long wikipedia articles until you get to number 279 and it hangs around for like 3 seconds and clearly has "you wasted your time enjoyable human being lmao - signed, god" etched in it

imagine that but instead it flies into his mouth and he becomes super Saiyan and fucks your mom boy that would show u

ClamdestineBoyster
Aug 15, 2015



Well I think it helps if you factor in darkside metals that form outside of the nova state. There’s condensing blueshifting metals like titanium and chrome that don’t form from acid electrolysis. That way you’re not trying to build crystal lattices on top of the mountain peak that you know will teeter one way or the other. Remember Newtonian physics apply at the atomic and subatomic levels.

Stark Fist
Oct 30, 2007

W E L C O M E T O M Y C U S T O M T I T L E ! ! !


ClamdestineBoyster posted:

Well I think it helps if you factor in darkside metals that form outside of the nova state. There’s condensing blueshifting metals like titanium and chrome that don’t form from acid electrolysis. That way you’re not trying to build crystal lattices on top of the mountain peak that you know will teeter one way or the other. Remember Newtonian physics apply at the atomic and subatomic levels.

Shadow0
Jun 16, 2008


Grimey Drawer

I'm positive in the vast, vast reaches of space, a few protons of these elements have accidentally been formed (perhaps more commonly in supernova), but they have a half-life of trillionths of a second, so it's hard to ever find any.

I don't think the elements themselves are necessarily the goal (outside of merely "can we do it?"), but the process of making them and the way they decay (or don't) help us unstand atoms and quarks etc more. I think that's the main reason physicists are making these things. Also you get to name them after things!

AfaIk, the island of stability is merely theoretical, it might not actually exist. We won't know until we get there.

I think it's interesting you can get all these protons to stick together despite their charge, and that the neutrons are somehow essential as well. I think the strong force is pretty interesting. Also quantum chromodynamics is a rad name for something.

Shadow0
Jun 16, 2008


Grimey Drawer

Also, what this guy said:

ClamdestineBoyster posted:

Well I think it helps if you factor in darkside metals that form outside of the nova state. There’s condensing blueshifting metals like titanium and chrome that don’t form from acid electrolysis. That way you’re not trying to build crystal lattices on top of the mountain peak that you know will teeter one way or the other. Remember Newtonian physics apply at the atomic and subatomic levels.

slave to my cravings
Mar 1, 2007

Got my mind on doritos and doritos on my mind.

I want some dark rear end metals.

“What you like my electrons? Don’t touch em. Don’t be touchin’ em”

staple remover
Oct 9, 2018

by FactsAreUseless


Shadow0 posted:

I'm positive in the vast, vast reaches of space, a few protons of these elements have accidentally been formed (perhaps more commonly in supernova), but they have a half-life of trillionths of a second, so it's hard to ever find any.

I don't think the elements themselves are necessarily the goal (outside of merely "can we do it?"), but the process of making them and the way they decay (or don't) help us unstand atoms and quarks etc more. I think that's the main reason physicists are making these things. Also you get to name them after things!

AfaIk, the island of stability is merely theoretical, it might not actually exist. We won't know until we get there.

I think it's interesting you can get all these protons to stick together despite their charge, and that the neutrons are somehow essential as well. I think the strong force is pretty interesting. Also quantum chromodynamics is a rad name for something.

Where would I begin to start learning these concepts in depth independent of the money necessary for a university degree? I don't want a job, I'm just interested in these things.

Say Nothing
Mar 4, 2013
Probation
Can't post for 12 days!


Unununium was the best element name.
Pity they renamed it Roentgenium.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roentgenium

ClamdestineBoyster
Aug 15, 2015



I think the greatest engineering feat we could do would be to create a hollow electron cloud without a proton mass that orbits the hydrogen proton in the middle of the galaxy as if it were a whole atom via the paths of all the stars in the galaxy within an acute degree of horizontal pitch.

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Lazyhound
Mar 1, 2004

A squid eating dough in a polyethylene bag is fast and bulbous—got me?

Soiled Meat

staple remover posted:

Where would I begin to start learning these concepts in depth independent of the money necessary for a university degree? I don't want a job, I'm just interested in these things.

Try the Khan Academy courses, maybe?

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