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KOTEX GOD OF BLOOD
Jul 7, 2012



I thought this was a finely crafted film. Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz were just good, but Olivia Colman in particular absolutely killed it, there should be an Oscar nod for her. There were many little touches, although they varied in subtlety. I loved the ending in particular, which was very poignant and masterful in its use of the multiple-exposure effect and the ambient aspects of the score, a couple of my favorite (HAH!) things about it. There are two big issues with it.

The first is that this film has one trick, which it does really well, but it quickly becomes tiresome, it is the only thing it knows how to do, and it does it for the entire two hours. By the end, the cycle of predictably cutthroat antics, witty yet anachronistic dialogue, and self-conscious bawdiness becomes tedious. Did the guy jerking off in the carriage in front of her serve any purpose at all other than to demonstrate the film's edginess?

The other is the cinematography. Sometimes the compositions are wonderful, and I really liked how it dealt with the darkness of the nearly windowless spaces in a palace. But it otherwise comes across as artificial. Daytime scenes are almost always shot with characters next to huge windows. Nighttime scenes have the candlelight blown out, creating a Harry Potter-like effect. A good counterexample to this is Barry Lyndon – Kubrick wanted to capture the effect of what it is really like to huddle by candlelight in an 18th century mansion, so he retrofitted lenses used by NASA to image the dark side of the moon, employing the largest f-stop ever used in a film, to shoot the whole drat thing with natural light. I'm not saying Lanthimos needed to go that far, but it would have been nice if something were done to prevent it from coming across as a low-budget period drama in many scenes.

3.5

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