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Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


Motronic posted:

First guess if the carb doesn't do it (it's the carb): it's a bad magneto. The running fine until heat loading and then not running right later is a thing I've seen.


You should absolutely do that.

FYI, don't touch poo poo on your new carb. Just install it. Most of them are coming set well enough that you don't want to even mess with them until you have run thing up to temp.

I did get an inline spark tester at HF when I was there. Is there a better way to diagnose a bad magneto? I wasn't planning on doing anything to the new carb. All the reviews said to just throw it on and fire it up. It was a pretty good deal considering it comes with a bunch of pipe cleaners sized for cleaning jets and passages, a new fuel filter, and a fuel shutoff valve (which I didn't have). I had already ordered new fuel line, but it's looking like it might be a huge PITA to get at the tank nipple.

My biggest concern is that the governor linkage might be hosed up from me wrestling the throttle linkage off the carb. It felt like it was running low from the get-go. The governor is definitely working because I can see it respond after I manually rev it, but I could have twisted it on the shaft. It's a loving pain in the rear end to get at.

I bought a new cheapest 2-stage Ariens tonight that I'm picking up in the morning, so I figure the carb will show up and the tractor will run perfectly to spite my $800 purchase (the tractor with 40" blower and 48" mower deck was only $1000, with perhaps $100 into it for parts). I still need the little guy for getting into some of the tighter spots the tractor won't be able to navigate, and also for clearing a path to the oil and propane fill locations.

E: I'm more likely to go with the all terrain lawn tractor. I've got some nice hills and a trail.

Mr. Powers fucked around with this message at 03:46 on Dec 10, 2019

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Elviscat
Jan 1, 2008

High Energy, Good Feeling!



Look up the procedure for resetting your governor, and just do that, it's a really simple deal.

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


Elviscat posted:

Look up the procedure for resetting your governor, and just do that, it's a really simple deal.

I have the repair manual for the engine. The diagrams are less than helpful, as they're line art, and the manual covers 20 years of the engine with two major configurations (vertical and horizontal) and several major revisions. The only diagram for "static governor adjustment" is for a different configuration (but it's the same process for all of them, just can't figure out what's what on mine).

Also, I swear the diagrams they have assume that you have removed everything from the engine except the one part you're working on because there's always plenty of space to get tools in places where tools totally can't fit in reality.

E: Son of a bitch, finally found a video that shows the area, and it's totally tucked behind the muffler, so that will have to come off, too.

Mr. Powers fucked around with this message at 05:08 on Dec 10, 2019

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Mr. Powers posted:

I did get an inline spark tester at HF when I was there. Is there a better way to diagnose a bad magneto?

Oh, look at Mr. Fancy with the inline spark tester. The rest of us keep one of our used plugs around, switch the lead to that and ground the plug out on the surrounding sheet metal or block.

But seriously....yeah, that's a good way. If you can find the specs you can also check what the resistance should be and check it when its misbehaving and also when cold to see if it varies wildly and is out of spec all the time anyway.

Colostomy Bag
Jan 11, 2016

C-Bangin' it



Don't beat yourself up about the governor linkage, a lot of them are not fun depending on engine.

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


Motronic posted:

Oh, look at Mr. Fancy with the inline spark tester. The rest of us keep one of our used plugs around, switch the lead to that and ground the plug out on the surrounding sheet metal or block.

But seriously....yeah, that's a good way. If you can find the specs you can also check what the resistance should be and check it when its misbehaving and also when cold to see if it varies wildly and is out of spec all the time anyway.

The tester was cheaper than a plug.

How much of a pita is it to make up new plug wires? It doesn't look like you can buy it, just plug cord and boots. The ones on there look original.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

Mr. Powers posted:

How much of a pita is it to make up new plug wires? It doesn't look like you can buy it, just plug cord and boots. The ones on there look original.

The plug wires and boots aren't permanently attached to the magneto on that engine?

Mr. Powers
Jun 28, 2005

white and gold.


Motronic posted:

The plug wires and boots aren't permanently attached to the magneto on that engine?

Maybe they are? The magneto is the next later down in the engine so I haven't seen it yet. I was try to apply car knowledge to small engines.

E: based on replacement parts, they totally are. That solves that mystery.

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



Bleak Gremlin

I need a lawn mower soonish

My options are limited, here are a few from Canadian Tire and Walmart I was considering:

Yardworks 150cc 3-in-1 Lawn Mower, 21-in

Yard Machines 21" 140cc 3 in 1 Push Mower

Husqvarna 163cc 3-in-1 Gas Lawn Mower, 21-in

Troy-Bilt 160cc 3-in-1 Self Propelled FWD Lawn Mower, 21-in

All lawnmower reviews seem to be negative. What would give me my best bang for my buck?

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


^^ Can't comment on the current B&S motors, but my 22+ year old 3.5HP B&S Classic is unbelievable. Last year, I did the oil change because I literally couldn't remember the last time I did it. And maybe a tablespoon of sludge came out. So it was basically dry for lord knows how long.This year, went to pull it out of storage (which is under my deck so it still gets Canadian winter temps and snow drifts) and saw I still had half a tank of 6 month old ethanol laden gas in it. Shrugged. Primed it twice. Pulled. Fired up immediately. First pull. It was so easy you would think it was a warm start. Horrible dirty air filter and all.

Just unbelievable how tough this little bastard is.

Uncle Lloyd
Sep 2, 2019


I'd buy the Troy-Bilt. Honda or bust for small engines.

beep-beep car is go
Apr 11, 2005

I can just eyeball this, right?


slidebite posted:

^^ Can't comment on the current B&S motors, but my 22+ year old 3.5HP B&S Classic is unbelievable. Last year, I did the oil change because I literally couldn't remember the last time I did it. And maybe a tablespoon of sludge came out. So it was basically dry for lord knows how long.This year, went to pull it out of storage (which is under my deck so it still gets Canadian winter temps and snow drifts) and saw I still had half a tank of 6 month old ethanol laden gas in it. Shrugged. Primed it twice. Pulled. Fired up immediately. First pull. It was so easy you would think it was a warm start. Horrible dirty air filter and all.

Just unbelievable how tough this little bastard is.

I have a Lowe’s special “Bolens” walk behind with some kind of B&S motor and I literally ignored it for 5 years. Threw whatever gas I had and mowed. This year I decided to be “nice” to it and went all out. New blade (raking/dethaching blade), new air filter, new plug, new oil. After changing everything and priming it still started on the first pull. I figure I have another 5 years of ignoring it now.

rdb
Jul 8, 2002
chicken mctesticles?

I would buy the cheapest non self propelled model you can find. You can beat the snot out if it and if it breaks or you let gas sit in it for 5 years parts are widely available and

My experience with modern briggs engines has not been mixed but mostly not good. The single cylinder push mower type stuff has been fine. V-twins, I bought a scag tiger cat with a commercial turf briggs v-twin in 2014. It blew its sump gasket the next year. I caught it quick, machine had 40 hours and a warranty so the dealer fixed it. It was out of commission for weeks. At about 150 hours it knocked for about 3 seconds and tossed a rod. No warning, had clean oil, out of warranty. I replaced it with a briggs vanguard 810 thats done ok so far, but only has 25 hours on it.

Captain McAllister
May 24, 2001


My dad has one of the Greenworks twin blade mowers from Taiwan Tire. I got a used one from a coworker a few years ago (and after my dad got his).

It uses 2 batteries, which on a full charge is enough to get my front and back yards done (depending on thickness of grass).

It has a plastic mower body/deck, which means it's light as hell so you can hang it off a wall or whatever.

Best of all, there's no monkeying around with gas, carbs, oil etc. (I have a car, truck, classic truck project and a motorbike the last thing I need is another ICE to have to gently caress around with).

BalloonFish
Jun 30, 2013



Grimey Drawer

Question for the thread:

I have an old (30-ish years) Makita portable generator with a 7hp Fuji-Robin engine. I've had it a little under a year and it's worked fine, both electrically and mechanically.

The other day I decided to give it a service for the first time in my ownership (so the oil that came out was whatever the last owner put in). A bit dark but not at all sludgy and no swarf or nasties.

The sticker on the engine says it takes SAE 30 in the summer and 10w30 in the winter. I had 10w30 mineral oil on the shelf so used that.

With the new oil in the engine's low-oil shutoff keeps tripping, even though the oil level is right up to the Max mark (it's one of those engines where you take the reading by unscrewing the dipstick and inserting it back into the hole without screwing it down). In any case, it's a 250-ish cc engine and I've put 0.85 litres of oil in it, and the oil is visible through the dipstick hole so it is by no means dangerously low.

The engine has a manual governor with three setting, Idle, Start, and High (you only use it as a generator on High). It will run all day on High (3000rpm) but the oil shutoff will trip after 10-20 seconds of running on Start (approx 1500rpm) or Idle.

The oil sensor is piezo-electric where the probe vibrates and generates electrical 'ticks' when not dipped in oil (which otherwise damps out the 'ticks'). The box on the side of the engine counts the 'ticks' and once a certain number are counted it grounds the magneto and stops the engine (and flashes the warning light).

I have taken the sensor out of the sump and run the engine with a finger over the end to stop it 'ticking' and it doesn't trip. Remove the finger and after a few seconds the sensor trips and the engine stops.

So the sensor is, broadly, working and the oil is the correct grade and amount. But would a modern 10w30 car engine oil (which is what is now in it) be marginally thinner than a machinery oil from the 1980s? Or could something in the blend of even a modern cheap mineral car oil remove its 'damping' properties?

Unfortunately I don't have any straight 30-weight oil to swap to and see if that solves it, and I drained the old oil into a rather dirty pan so I don't want to pour that back in and see if that solves it.

In the interests of experiment I'm going to get a lawnmower-specific 10w30 and a bottle of straight SAE30 and try that if the multigrade still causes the shutoff to trip. And if the single-grade oil still doesn't solve it I'll assume that the sensor is faulty and that the previous owner put 20w50 or something in there!

None of this is a vital concern. I'm sure oil sensors for 1980s Robin engines are now unobtanium and I can just bypass the sensor (it doesn't burn or leak any oil and it's not like I leave it unattended for hours running my house - I use it for power tools in the garden/garage beyond the reach of extension cables) but I'd be interested in any thoughts or experiences.

Pictures for interest:



slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


That's a good question, but I doubt it. I'm far from an expert on those sensors though.

Those things pretty much only use dino oil anyhow and I can't see how it would make a difference especially since it is a spec for winter duty.

Good troubleshooting job though. Personally, I'd probably just bypass the sensor since you have an easily accessible dipstick.

zundfolge
Apr 11, 2007


There are a fair number of those sensors on eBay, I can’t quite make out the part number on yours (OSA-63-2D?) but this one looks right if so. Probably cheaper to try a straight 30W oil though.

sharkytm
Oct 9, 2003

Gimme Gimme Swedish Fish...

Fallen Rib

10w30 and 30w are going to be the same weight in warm weather. Different blends have the same (or close enough) viscosities. Don't put anything fancy in an old generator. Cheap Dino oil is what it was designed for.

I always slightly overfill my Honda small engines because I usually only change/check the oil once every couple months, andi want them to work if they're on an angle or whatever.

Have you stuck the sensor tip in a container of oil? It might just have gotten damaged and not be reading correctly.

It's either the sensor or the oil level, not much else to say there.

sharkytm fucked around with this message at 12:46 on Apr 28, 2020

BalloonFish
Jun 30, 2013



Grimey Drawer

Thanks for the responses, people. Pretty much as I thought, but I have an update:

sharkytm posted:

10w30 and 30w are going to be the same weight in warm weather. Different blends have the same (or close enough) viscosities. Don't put anything fancy in an old generator. Cheap Dino oil is what it was designed for.

Yesterday I did exactly that - bought some cheap SAE30 mineral oil from the local DIY/tool repair place. Intended specifically for lawnmowers, generators and other small portable plant.

This morning I went to swap the oil and had the same idea you did; while I ran the engine up to warm the oil I had the sensor out of the sump and sitting in the open bottle of new oil. It ran like that without a hitch for 10 minutes.



Testing the probe in the cheap oil. All good.

Success, I thought! So I swapped the oil, warmed up the engine for a few minutes at the fast idle then ran it at operating speed with a 2000W heat gun plugged into it. All fine.



240V and no oil warning light - as it should be!

Then I did what I usually do before I put the genny away in the shed and ran it at the fast idle with the fuel tap shut to cool down and empty the fuel line/carb bowl. After a couple of minutes running like that...the oil shutoff tripped.

I started it up again and after 10 seconds it tripped again. I checked the oil level on the dipstick and the oil was all foamy - this was not the case when I checked the level immediately after a run before, when it was tripping with the 10w30 in it. So the oil doesn't necessarily foam in normal use.



Here's the dipstick as used to check the level. As you can see the level reaches the bottom of the hatched 'Max' mark, so while it could be a few mm higher it's by no means low and it's certainly not overfilled.



Here's a view down the dipstick hole - foamy!

I let the genny sit for an hour and checked the oil again - same level and the foam had dispersed. Gave it a test run. It will run and run at the normal speed, and will tick over happily at idle but once the oil is hot the shutdown will trip after about 10 seconds of running at the middle speed. And the oil is foamy again.

Surely even a cheap oil isn't going to foam when used in a simple engine at the correct level?

I'm more perplexed by this as a diagnostic exercise than frustrated - as I said it's not like I use the generator much, and then not for anything vital. But it does bug me that it was working perfectly before my well-intentioned service, and that as someone who likes to think of themselves as mechanically knowledgeable and adept I've managed to make things worse by doing a straight oil change on a simple single-cylinder flathead engine!

The fact that the shutoff doesn't trip at idle or operating speed makes me suspect that the probe or the control box is faulty in some way, although the foamy oil obviously isn't ideal. So, as much as my perfectionist side doesn't like it, I'll probably put the 10w30 which didn't foam back in and bypass the sensor.

TrueChaos
Nov 14, 2006




Are you sure it's not overfilled with oil? It'll foam if there's too much, because the crankshaft is whipping around in the top of the oil.

BalloonFish
Jun 30, 2013



Grimey Drawer

TrueChaos posted:

Are you sure it's not overfilled with oil? It'll foam if there's too much, because the crankshaft is whipping around in the top of the oil.

I'm as sure as I can be - I'm pretty sure I'm using and reading the dipstick properly (unscrew it, wipe it, put it back in the hole without screwing it down, take the reading) and the engine ran fine with no sign of foaming with the oil at the same mark on the stick, measured the same way, before I started dicking around with changing the oil.

Edit: In case I'm missing something obvious, here's the sticker on how to check the oil level:



I don't have the handbook for the genset and the placard on the engine doesn't give the required quantity. I did find an online version of the manual for the next-later version of my generator, using a later model of the same engine and that says it takes 1.0 litre of oil. I have put approx 0.8 litres into the engine to get just below the Max mark on the stick.

I did think I could drain some of the oil out so it was 1/3 or 1/2 on the stick, which would be safe to run for a test and see if it still foams and/or trips.

Preventative maintenance on small machines seems really overrated sometimes - why can't I be one of those people happy to leave stuff well alone until it breaks?

BalloonFish fucked around with this message at 16:55 on Apr 29, 2020

angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



Oven Wrangler

When you initially serviced it and used oil you had "on the shelf" was it something that had been opened for some time, where it could possibly be contaminated with condensation?

BalloonFish
Jun 30, 2013



Grimey Drawer

angryrobots posted:

When you initially serviced it and used oil you had "on the shelf" was it something that had been opened for some time, where it could possibly be contaminated with condensation?

It was a bottle of simple 10w30 mineral oil I bought last year for topping up one of my old cars but never used. It was unopened and to put it in the generator I had to break the foil seal. So I don't think contamination is the cause.

BalloonFish fucked around with this message at 16:58 on Apr 29, 2020

BalloonFish
Jun 30, 2013



Grimey Drawer

My generator mystery is resolved - but not in a very satisfactory way. I spent this morning on another go at this.

The genny still has the cheap SAE30 in it which foamed. Checked the oil level - no foam, just below Max level on the stick. Started the engine, ran it at fast idle for a couple of minutes, shut it down, checked the dipstick - little bubbles in the oil. Started it back up, it ran for 2-3 minutes more, the oil shutoff tripped. Check the dipstick - loads of foam.

I decided that all this oil was doing was creating another problem, so I decided to go back to the 10w30 which only had problem of tripping the shutoff. Before I did so I popped the oil sensor probe in the can of 10w30, and it ran happily for 5 minutes, so the sensor 'likes' the oil in that sense.

I drained the cheap SAE30 out (it came out with a foamy head like a badly-poured lager!) and put in the 10w30. I opted for absolute best practise, just in case - I left the probe out of the sump while I filled, just in case there was an air bubble getting under the probe or something. Filled the sump with the 10w30 to about three-quarters full on the stick, fired up the engine. It ran for about 5 minutes and then the oil sensor tripped. I checked the dipstick - no signs of foam whatsoever on either the stick or in the oil visible through the hole.

I topped up the sump to dead on the Max mark on the stick, just in case that was it (unlikely at this stage). As I did so I thought to check the wires going into and out of the oil sensor, in case there was a bad connection or a damaged insulation causing a ground or some sort of errant signal. Nothing visible there, and I checked and prodded the bullet connections. None seemed loose.

Started up the engine again, and it ran and ran and ran! I have no idea why, since it's now in exactly the same state as it was when I'd done the original oil change (a full sump of 10w30). I can only guess that there was/is a slightly dodgy connection or a little bit of broken or worn insulation on one of the wires and when I did the original oil change I had joggled something close to some other wire or surface so it was shorting/'ticking' with the vibration of the engine when it was running at the fast idle speed, which is why it wouldn't trip if run at idle or full speed. I started and stopped it a few times, checked the oil for level and signs of foaming (spot on the Max mark and zero foaming), then left it running at fast idle for 25 minutes until it used up what was left in the fuel tank.

So that's a result of sorts, although it's annoying not to find a specific problem. But even better to have it gone!

And clearly that cheap SAE30 I bought from the local DIY shop ("Specially formulated oil suitable for 4-stroke lawn mowers, stationary engines and generators. Contains special high performance additive for prolonging engine life") is utter poo poo and foams when used in engines with splash lubrication...

opengl128
Sep 16, 2010



Any pro tips on setting the low/high mixture screws on a 2 cycle? Trash picked a 25cc Craftsman blower which looks like it got curbed for gummed up/disintegrating fuel lines (thanks ethanol). Was going to just order new lines but the air filter was soaked too and I also needed a fuel filter/sinker, and it was cheaper to buy a whole carb kit with all of the above plus a new carb and plug and some other bits and pieces. Anyway, got it running but its badly in need of adjustment. Stumbles a bunch, only really stays running on half choke and wants to die when I give it throttle unless I do it really gradually. Just waiting on the screwdriver so I can adjust it (sorry not sorry EPA).

Also last week brought a really nice trashpicked Craftsman/B&S back to life by installing a $4 air vane spring, which the previous owners had tried to bodge together with a MASSIVE wad of electrical tape and sandwich twist ties. I don't get it but it's a lot nicer than my mower and self propelled too.

Yes I've been watching a lot of mustie1.

opengl128 fucked around with this message at 18:38 on May 21, 2020

BalloonFish
Jun 30, 2013



Grimey Drawer

opengl128 posted:

Any pro tips on setting the low/high mixture screws on a 2 cycle? Trash picked a 25cc Craftsman blower which looks like it got curbed for gummed up/disintegrating fuel lines (thanks ethanol). Was going to just order new lines but the air filter was soaked too and I also needed a fuel filter/sinker, and it was cheaper to buy a whole carb kit with all of the above plus a new carb and plug and some other bits and pieces. Anyway, got it running but its badly in need of adjustment. Stumbles a bunch, only really stays running on half choke and wants to die when I give it throttle unless I do it really gradually. Just waiting on the screwdriver so I can adjust it (sorry not sorry EPA).

It sounds like it's running too lean (hence why it needs the choke and suddenly opening the throttle plate kills it). When setting carbs I've always favoured just running both screws all the way in (gently so as not to squash the tips) then backing them both out one full turn, so you'll be in the zone where it will run but almost certainly too rich.

Let it run for a minute to get up to temperature then ease out the low-speed screw (usually less than a quarter of a turn) until you get the smoothest running or the fastest idle - some engines, especially two-strokes, seem to rise slightly in idle as they approach the ideal slow mixture then fall off as it goes too lean.

Do the same with the high-speed screw with the engine running on full throttle - slowly unscrew it until you get the smoothest/fastest running. Ideally you should then run it in a tiny bit so it's just slightly on the rich side.

You should then get an engine that idles smoothly, runs well at full speed and doesn't stumble when going between the two. If it does then open out the low-speed jet a little or raise the idle speed a bit.

opengl128 posted:

Yes I've been watching a lot of mustie1.

Same: I've been using lockdown to work through his back catalogue so now feel like I know how to spot sick VW engines at 10 paces.

Nidhg00670000
Mar 26, 2010

We're in the pipe, five by five.

Grimey Drawer

I've always run all my smaller stuff on alkylate gas, it seems a lot more stable than regular pump gas and apparently it's much better for emissions as well.

opengl128
Sep 16, 2010



BalloonFish posted:

It sounds like it's running too lean (hence why it needs the choke and suddenly opening the throttle plate kills it). When setting carbs I've always favoured just running both screws all the way in (gently so as not to squash the tips) then backing them both out one full turn, so you'll be in the zone where it will run but almost certainly too rich.

Let it run for a minute to get up to temperature then ease out the low-speed screw (usually less than a quarter of a turn) until you get the smoothest running or the fastest idle - some engines, especially two-strokes, seem to rise slightly in idle as they approach the ideal slow mixture then fall off as it goes too lean.

Do the same with the high-speed screw with the engine running on full throttle - slowly unscrew it until you get the smoothest/fastest running. Ideally you should then run it in a tiny bit so it's just slightly on the rich side.

You should then get an engine that idles smoothly, runs well at full speed and doesn't stumble when going between the two. If it does then open out the low-speed jet a little or raise the idle speed a bit.

Thanks! Screwdriver set arrives today so I'll give it a whirl.

Nidhg00670000 posted:

I've always run all my smaller stuff on alkylate gas, it seems a lot more stable than regular pump gas and apparently it's much better for emissions as well.

I picked up TruFuel to run in it since you can't get ethanol free gas at the pumps here. A little expensive but premixed and no worried about loving corn sauce gumming up the works.

opengl128
Sep 16, 2010



Running great now,

Fermented Tinal
Aug 25, 2005
PLEASE SHUT THE FUCK UP

tia


Marine gas here turns out to be ethanol free. Bit more expensive than pump gas but cheaper than Trufuel in the mower every week.

Another year come and gone and everything fires right up because the last tank was Trufuel though.

PitViper
May 25, 2003

Welcome and thank you for shopping at Wal-Mart!
I love you!


Luckily it's easy to find ethanol-free premium here. Most of the Kwik Trip stations have it as their only premium option, and a lot of smaller non-chain stations seem to as well, especially if they're close to a big recreational lake. I keep a 5 gallon can for the mower and snowblower, and they both start first or second pull every time.

Mercury Ballistic
Nov 14, 2005

not gun related

Just posting my past mistake. I have a husky backpack blower. It was great on whatever 50:1 mix I put in it for about 9 years. One day I moved it and it sat askew a few weeks between uses. From then on it would not start. Bought a new carb cause I never have luck cleaning carbs and it ran...ok. it would start and run to about 75% throttle and go to idle if I went past that. Dealt with it like that till yesterday when I noticed the gas supply line had degraded and was leaking gas everywhere. Replaced that and now it runs like new.

Moral of the story is check those hoses before spending any more $$.

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DrBouvenstein
Feb 28, 2007

I think I'm a doctor, but that doesn't make me a doctor. This fancy avatar does.


Fermented Tinal posted:

Marine gas here turns out to be ethanol free. Bit more expensive than pump gas but cheaper than Trufuel in the mower every week.

Same here, I live near a lake so there's a place a few miles away that sells ethanol free, but it's 91 or 93 octane, so I'm always curious if it's better to use that, or regular ethanol 87 with sta-bil added.

Related to the thread, in the past month or so I've fixed 5 small engines.

Two lawn mowers. One was free on the side of the road and needed a idle/governor spring and a carb clean. The other was my existing one and needed a new carb (tried to clean, but a couple gaskets got torn and a new one seemed easiest.)

One moped, the throttle and/or choke slide wasn't working right.

A trimmer. Side of road free pile from last summer, actually, needed a new gas line to/from primer bulb and a carb cleaning. Idle and throttle need adjustment, thankfully the screws on the carb only need a slotted driver, not that weird trimmer carb screwdriver.

And a free CL pressure washer, carb leaked gas, reassembled the float bowl and needle and it stopped.

I also picked up another free trimmer the other day, it starts but only stays on with half choke and thee throttle trigger held down. Haven't looked at it yet, but probably just needs adjustment of the idle screws, but I don't have that special screwdriver, maybe I'll try to adjust with pliers or get the screwdriver.

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