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SpartanIvy
May 18, 2007


Hair Elf

Bi-la kaifa posted:

Have you come across the "how to DOMINATE your neighbour by making SICK LINES with your push mower" yet? I love turf care but bored suburban dads kinda take it to a new level.

I also watch The Lawn Care Nut

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Hubis
May 18, 2003

Boy, I wish we had one of those doomsday machines...

Bi-la kaifa posted:

Have you come across the "how to DOMINATE your neighbour by making SICK LINES with your push mower" yet? I love turf care but bored suburban dads kinda take it to a new level.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXyzkWeD3AE

devicenull
May 30, 2007



Grimey Drawer

So I have some stream banks next to a drainage culvert I'm trying to prevent erosion on. The main goal here is really erosion control... it's far enough in the back yard I don't care about looks.

I'm looking for:

* Full shade tolerant
* Highly deer resistant
* No maintenance requirements
* Not an invasive species

I'm in NJ, zone 7a... it seems like I have a ton of options, but all of them seem to be invasive species.

I just want to prevent erosion with something green.. I could possibly get the town to come in and put in some riprap, but I think they'll want to tear down some of the trees to do it.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

devicenull posted:

So I have some stream banks next to a drainage culvert I'm trying to prevent erosion on. The main goal here is really erosion control... it's far enough in the back yard I don't care about looks.

I'm looking for:

* Full shade tolerant
* Highly deer resistant
* No maintenance requirements
* Not an invasive species

I'm in NJ, zone 7a... it seems like I have a ton of options, but all of them seem to be invasive species.

I just want to prevent erosion with something green.. I could possibly get the town to come in and put in some riprap, but I think they'll want to tear down some of the trees to do it.

I thought holly fern was pretty much always the answer to that question for this area. I mean, it's "invasive" in that it's not native, but in that zone it doesn't get out of control. It's legit invasive in like, texas, but not here.

devicenull
May 30, 2007



Grimey Drawer

Motronic posted:

I thought holly fern was pretty much always the answer to that question for this area. I mean, it's "invasive" in that it's not native, but in that zone it doesn't get out of control. It's legit invasive in like, texas, but not here.

It's on the 'do not plant' list, so not really something I'm excited about :

https://www.fohvos.info/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Strike_Team_Do_Not_Plant_List_2020_04_24-1.pdf

(that's the one that state website references)

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

devicenull posted:

It's on the 'do not plant' list, so not really something I'm excited about :

https://www.fohvos.info/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Strike_Team_Do_Not_Plant_List_2020_04_24-1.pdf

(that's the one that state website references)

Oh man, I was not aware of that. Then Do. Not. Plant.

I've got a local wildflower preserve near me. I'm in 6b, so real similar and they have a bunch of great options. Maybe a combination of some of these?

https://bhwp.org/wp-content/uploads/Shade-Loving-Native-Perennials.pdf

Here's the other lists and a link back to the actual site: https://bhwp.org/grow/garden-with-natives/right-plant-right-place/

They have master gardeners there that seem to be all about helping people figure this out. And you local county ag extension should be ready to do the same.

devicenull
May 30, 2007



Grimey Drawer

Motronic posted:

Oh man, I was not aware of that. Then Do. Not. Plant.

I've got a local wildflower preserve near me. I'm in 6b, so real similar and they have a bunch of great options. Maybe a combination of some of these?

https://bhwp.org/wp-content/uploads/Shade-Loving-Native-Perennials.pdf

Here's the other lists and a link back to the actual site: https://bhwp.org/grow/garden-with-natives/right-plant-right-place/

They have master gardeners there that seem to be all about helping people figure this out. And you local county ag extension should be ready to do the same.

Wow I had forgotten that the college nearby has a masters gardener email that can offer suggestions... I'll reach out to them and see what they suggest, thanks for the reminder!

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



Bi-la kaifa posted:

Have you come across the "how to DOMINATE your neighbour by making SICK LINES with your push mower" yet? I love turf care but bored suburban dads kinda take it to a new level.
Speaking of-

https://imgur.com/gallery/LJRhuVa

CommonShore
Jun 6, 2014

A true renaissance man




Someone please help me make sense of john deere 44" lawn tractor snowblower attachments. There seem to be two types but I can't find any articles or information that explains the difference.

There's one version that has a long frame with a drive train that extends under the whole tractor in place of the deck (that's what I have) but I went to install it and none of the bushings or mounts seem to line up, and now when I look for "how to install" videos, everyone is installing this other version that entirely mounts on the front with really only the drive belt going underneath the tractor and no frame at all.

I bought the attachment used, and my research at the time didn't find anything about different sorts or incompatibilities so I snagged it. Right now I just need to figure out if my 2019 E160 can use this blower, or if i just need to buy some parts which I lack, or if I should start trying to resell the fucker and order something new so i can keep my driveway clean in case we get some real snow soon. Help me my family is dying

e. update I phoned a dealer and he's looking at pictures of my mower and blower now.

CommonShore fucked around with this message at 18:26 on Oct 23, 2020

devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


I love my neighborís maple this time of year. I also appreciate that the leaves pretty much land/stay on the outside of the fence.

A 50S RAYGUN
Aug 21, 2011


devicenull posted:

So I have some stream banks next to a drainage culvert I'm trying to prevent erosion on. The main goal here is really erosion control... it's far enough in the back yard I don't care about looks.

I'm looking for:

* Full shade tolerant
* Highly deer resistant
* No maintenance requirements
* Not an invasive species

I'm in NJ, zone 7a... it seems like I have a ton of options, but all of them seem to be invasive species.

I just want to prevent erosion with something green.. I could possibly get the town to come in and put in some riprap, but I think they'll want to tear down some of the trees to do it.

how deer resistant are we talking? you could do something like a mondo grass, too.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



How hard is it to use a small excavator? We are thinking about doing a paver patio and all that digging for gravel drainage doesnít sound like something I want to do by hand

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

KKKLIP ART posted:

How hard is it to use a small excavator? We are thinking about doing a paver patio and all that digging for gravel drainage doesnít sound like something I want to do by hand

I don't think you'll want an excavator for that kind of work. Sounds like a skid steer, potentially the walk behind type depending on size of the job. Those are very easy to use.

Running an excavator to a level of proficiency where you can make flat bottom trenches is not something you perfect on day 1. Or even week 1.

devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


So the back 15-20ft of my property is a drainage easement. For the first two springs we owned the house it turned into a total swamp so that seems to be normal. Fun for the kids to stomp through though!

As Iíve been doing yard projects any excess dirt gets sprinkled into the low spots.





Once I can fill in the south side of the ditch, Iíll start spreading grass seed into the mud. Ultimately, I want to turn the entire easement into a native plant/flower/tree extravaganza.

A 50S RAYGUN
Aug 21, 2011


Motronic posted:

I don't think you'll want an excavator for that kind of work. Sounds like a skid steer, potentially the walk behind type depending on size of the job. Those are very easy to use.

Running an excavator to a level of proficiency where you can make flat bottom trenches is not something you perfect on day 1. Or even week 1.

how would you have someone do gravel drainage with a skid?

while its not super easy to use a mini, i don't realistically know how you would do like french or gravel drainage using a skid steer if you're new to it.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

A 50S RAYGUN posted:

how would you have someone do gravel drainage with a skid?

while its not super easy to use a mini, i don't realistically know how you would do like french or gravel drainage using a skid steer if you're new to it.

Is that what's being talked about here? A french drain? If so, then yeah, you need a backhoe or miniex. But I took this as digging for a gravel pad.

And if it is a french drain, best to splash out for the operator was well as the machine.

angryrobots
Mar 31, 2005



It doesn't sound like the person asking is installing a french drain, though? They want to install a paver patio, which entails excavating a large area by only a few inches, and then installing a gravel/sand base layer, level and ready for pavers.

Edit, beaten

A 50S RAYGUN
Aug 21, 2011


i mean, i'm not sure - 'gravel drainage' to me sounds like one thing, but i've also put in a lot of french and tile drainage in my life so maybe I'm misinterpreting.

if you're just doing a pad for a patio then you would absolutely want a skid steer over a mini excavator, even if you were a skilled excavator operator

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



Yeah essentially I need to a so many square feet surface area with 6 inch dig. Thatís a lot of dirt that I didnít want to shovel by hand if possible.

Motronic
Nov 6, 2009


MOTRONIC FOR MODERATOR, MAKE AI GREAT AGAIN


Grimey Drawer

KKKLIP ART posted:

Yeah essentially I need to a so many square feet surface area with 6 inch dig. Thatís a lot of dirt that I didnít want to shovel by hand if possible.

Yeah, so like I said.....you sure as hell do not want a mini ex. Even with a grading bucket. And even if you were an expert operator. It's the wrong machine.

What experience do you actually have running equipment? If I asked you to roll the bucket out what hand would you use and which direction would you move it? Yes, I'm being real basic and snarky....but seriously.....if you don't know how to run the gear it's gonna make a mess of the place and take more time. You don't learn how to run gear on rental gear that you are paying for to do a job of your own.

I love running and learning how to run this kind of gear. But that's not a thing you can do with cost efficiency when trying to do small jobs in your yard.

A 50S RAYGUN
Aug 21, 2011


i mean, a day rental for a skid steer (presumably a CTL, really, but for whatever reason everyone on my farm has always used 'skid steer' to mean both tracked and wheeled compact loaders and i hate it but it's habit) is probably in the region of 2-400 dollars from a home depot. as a rule i'd probably not tell a guy to learn to run powerful machinery immediately next to where he shits and eats, but if he wants to do it, okay.

you do not want a mini excavator - an excavator bucket is not the right shape to remove six inches of dirt across such a wide area. you also probably do not want a mini ctl - operator fatigue sets in if you're not used to standing on that sort of thing and also whatever underpowered pos they're going to have for rent will probably not be very good at cutting dirt.

if you do want to do this yourself, please at the very least hand shovel at least two shovelwidths off of whatever face of your house you are working near. i have no idea what an equipment rental place would have available, but you want your bucket to be wider than your machine. don't spin your tires or tracks. change the angle of your bucket before you resort to moving the arms.

A 50S RAYGUN
Aug 21, 2011


also call before you dig and don't crash into your house.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

KKKLIP ART posted:

Yeah essentially I need to a so many square feet surface area with 6 inch dig. Thatís a lot of dirt that I didnít want to shovel by hand if possible.

Itís a lot, but Iíd honestly just get a good shovel, wheelbarrow, pick and go for it. Itís a good afternoon or two of work, and for most patios itíd probably be just as fast to do it by hand. Stake out your mason lines, use the 3-4-5 method to square up your corner, and go nuts. Also, 6Ē seems kinda shallow, you want 4-6Ē of compacted gravel underneath the blocks, otherwise everything will heave with freeze/thaw cycles.

https://youtu.be/z1N_eHGIzj0

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



Whatís a freeze/thaw cycle

Iím in the southeast and would of course call my planning board to ask what they suggest but if we get 3 freezing days a year itís a very cold year. Iíve just seen on average 4 inches gravel, an inch of sand, pavers.

The Bird
Dec 7, 2006




devicenull posted:

So I have some stream banks next to a drainage culvert I'm trying to prevent erosion on. The main goal here is really erosion control... it's far enough in the back yard I don't care about looks.

I'm looking for:

* Full shade tolerant
* Highly deer resistant
* No maintenance requirements
* Not an invasive species

I'm in NJ, zone 7a... it seems like I have a ton of options, but all of them seem to be invasive species.

I just want to prevent erosion with something green.. I could possibly get the town to come in and put in some riprap, but I think they'll want to tear down some of the trees to do it.

I'm on the left coast, so can't really give you a recommendation. I would say to call your local nursery of you want container plants/plugs. They will be able to provide a better recommendation than anyone on SA.

Otherwise search for a lawn seed company in your area. They should have an erosion control mix. They may even have mixes that can provide habitat!
Another thing you could do is check with your local stormwater utility. They probably have a stormwater plant list/guidelines for upland/midland/wetland applications with local non-invasive species that you can select from.

Do you have to irrigate in NJ? I am eternally jealous of East Coasters that don't (if they even exist).

The Bird fucked around with this message at 17:15 on Oct 27, 2020

The Bird
Dec 7, 2006




wesleywillis posted:

Just curious, why wouldn't they use sand? Aside from gravel probably being more suitable? Is it a drainage thing?

You use 3/4 minus base because the rocks are angular and they "lock", providing a stable base and larger pore matrix under the slab.

You do not want sand under your concrete. There is nowhere where that is a thing. You put sand under pavers for leveling.

The Bird
Dec 7, 2006




KKKLIP ART posted:

Whatís a freeze/thaw cycle

Iím in the southeast and would of course call my planning board to ask what they suggest but if we get 3 freezing days a year itís a very cold year. Iíve just seen on average 4 inches gravel, an inch of sand, pavers.

So, freeze depth is something to take into consideration when considering footing (structural) depth and pipe trench depth. Doing a 4" base of 3/4 minus (not gravel) and an inch of sand is the correct depths for those layers.
At least for a pedestrian paver path/patio. If you are doing a driveway, I would check the manufacturers website for vehicular installation details. You may need to go to the 6" 3/4 minus base if you are putting a vehicle on the pavers.

If you really want to do a good job, rent a tamper or vibrating plate, wet down the base, and compact it after putting down the 4". You can get by with just the vibrating plate.

The Bird fucked around with this message at 15:58 on Oct 27, 2020

devicenull
May 30, 2007



Grimey Drawer

The Bird posted:

I'm on the left coast, so can't really give you a recommendation. I would say to call your local nursery of you want container plants/plugs. They will be able to provide a better recommendation than anyone on SA.

Otherwise search for a lawn seed company in your area. They should have an erosion control mix. They may even have mixes that can provide habitat!
Another thing you could do is check with your local stormwater utility. They probably have a stormwater plant list/guidelines for upland/midland/wetland applications with local non-invasive species that you can select from.

Do you have to irrigate in NJ? I am eternally jealous of East Coasters that don't (if they even exist).

The place near me is suggesting Golden Ragwort, which seems like a poor choice for someone that's allergic to ragweed!

Erosion control mix might do it, I'll see if I can find something that tolerates no light.

I'll probably just wait until spring... we've had some frost already, so planting anything would seem to be a waste.

A 50S RAYGUN posted:

how deer resistant are we talking? you could do something like a mondo grass, too.

Every bush in the neighborhood is bare up until about 5 feet, because the deer are relentless. Mondo grass might be a good idea, although it depends how much it spreads.

The Bird
Dec 7, 2006




I don't know if these are available in your area, but they meet your criteria of shade/deer resistant/moisture:

Sarcococca humilis - Creeping Sweetbox @ 3' OC
Vinca minor - Bowles Periwinkle @ 18" OC
Ajuga repens - Bugleherb @ 12" OC
Hakonechloa macra - Japanese Forest Grass @ 24" OC

and then any fern (you could go larger with these). You could do a mix (just try and make pockets of (3-5 of ea plant). Seed some pockets of erosion control mix and get a foundation of other plants/groundcovers going.
I also don't know if any of these are invasive in your area, but they are all low-maintenance.

The Bird fucked around with this message at 23:48 on Oct 27, 2020

devicenull
May 30, 2007



Grimey Drawer

The Bird posted:

I don't know if these are available in your area, but they meet your criteria of shade/deer resistant/moisture:

Sarcococca humilis - Creeping Sweetbox @ 3' OC
Vinca minor - Bowles Periwinkle @ 18" OC
Ajuga repens - Bugleherb @ 12" OC
Hakonechloa macra - Japanese Forest Grass @ 24" OC

and then any fern (you could go larger with these). You could do a mix (just try and make pockets of (3-5 of ea plant). Seed some pockets of erosion control mix and get a foundation of other plants/groundcovers going.
I also don't know if any of these are invasive in your area, but they are all low-maintenance.

Thanks for the suggestions!

This is what I'm dealing with (lovely fence isn't mine):


The Bird
Dec 7, 2006




devicenull posted:

Thanks for the suggestions!

This is what I'm dealing with (lovely fence isn't mine):




So, I know that you don't care about the aesthetics and I also do not know how this relates to your house and what you see every day. Is this close to your house? Do you see that fence everyday? Do you have an issue with your neighbor's 2nd story windows overlooking the back/any other privacy concerns along that property line? If so, I would plant a large hedge of Portugal Laurel (Prunus lusitanica) @ 6' OC about 4' off that fence. Especially if you do not plan on repairing it/splitting the repair with your neighbors. That would give you some privacy AND if the hedge gets far enough along, it will actually provide some support to the fence and prolong the time before you completely lose all privacy (it looks like some of the rails have separated from the posts, so you don't have long).

I would really check with whatever stormwater district/governing body is in charge of that ditch before you do anything. Some are very stringent on allowed plant material, mulching, etc. If you do something against their guidelines, you could be liable to change it OR pay for damages to their system if they can connect it to you (not very likely - "Who's bark chip mulch is this in our catch basin? We only allow shredded wood fiber!").

The Bird fucked around with this message at 19:34 on Oct 28, 2020

Kaiser Schnitzel
Mar 28, 2006

Schnitzel mit uns




devicenull posted:

Thanks for the suggestions!

This is what I'm dealing with (lovely fence isn't mine):




You're going to have a hard time getting much going in all that shade (and with all those walnut seedlings). I hate to say it and I know it's invasive, but this might one of those places where English ivy is actually the right choice.

devicenull
May 30, 2007



Grimey Drawer

The Bird posted:

So, I know that you don't care about the aesthetics and I also do not know how this relates to your house and what you see every day. Is this close to your house? Do you see that fence everyday? Do you have an issue with your neighbor's 2nd story windows overlooking the back/any other privacy concerns along that property line? If so, I would plant a large hedge of Portugal Laurel (Prunus lusitanica) @ 6' OC about 4' off that fence. Especially if you do not plan on repairing it/splitting the repair with your neighbors. That would give you some privacy AND if the hedge gets far enough along, it will actually provide some support to the fence and prolong the time before you completely lose all privacy (it looks like some of the rails have separated from the posts, so you don't have long).

I would really check with whatever stormwater district/governing body is in charge of that ditch before you do anything. Some are very stringent on allowed plant material, mulching, etc. If you do something against their guidelines, you could be liable to change it OR pay for damages to their system if they can connect it to you (not very likely - "Who's bark chip mulch is this in our catch basin? We only allow shredded wood fiber!").

Luckily this part of the (terrible) fence is in a place where even if it falls it doesn't impact privacy much. We addressed the main privacy issues earlier this year with some bushes.

We're not on the best terms with this neighbor (they tried throwing some of the even shittier fence panels into our back yard as a way to get rid of them), so I don't think any fence repair is going to be happening.

This is an area I don't really care too much about how it looks, so I wasn't going to go crazy with mulch or anything. The only reason I'm even dealing with it is we have some people coming to get rid of a large pile of branches, and I've been moving all the dead stuff from this area to the pile.

Maybe I'll just let it erode - it's the lovely neighbors backyard that's going to end up in the river!

The Bird
Dec 7, 2006




I don't know what your soil is like but, unless you are going to do some prep, it probably wouldn't be worth spending money planting or seeding unless it was a very aggressive plant that requires no maintenance. The ivy mentioned above would be the best option (and would also possibly invade into your neighbor's in a much more passive aggressive way).If your city/storwater authority will riprap the bank for free, that would be the best option. That is your dirt!

Someone above mentioned walnut. If you do have walnut trees, you won't be able to grow anything because of the allelopathic toxins they release into the soil. I can't tell if those volunteers you having coming up are walnut. I do see maple and maybe a catalpa?

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-5-P...aUaAsesEALw_wcB

I'm eying this deal for a three piece lawn mower kit, but I noticed it only comes with one battery. Will I have to buy another one? It looks like the battery alone is like three hundred dollars.

OSU_Matthew
Aug 23, 2010

IT ME




Toilet Rascal

Bioshuffle posted:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-5-P...aUaAsesEALw_wcB

I'm eying this deal for a three piece lawn mower kit, but I noticed it only comes with one battery. Will I have to buy another one? It looks like the battery alone is like three hundred dollars.

I just bought into the Kobalt mower ecosystem a few months ago when I snapped one up the end of season clearance. 250 for the push mower (the kit one is self propelled), and recently 115 for the blower and 2AH battery. Iíve already got a Makita trimmer otherwise I woulda bought one as well.

I freaking love both the mower and blower. Both worked even on piles of wet leaves. The blower does churn through battery on turbo mode pretty fast, but itís enough for my postage stamp lot. The mower handles tall grass, mulches leaves, and was able to do my lot 3 times on a single charge. I donít need the self propelled version of it, and Iím extremely happy with the ergonomics and fold ability of the mower.

Iíd be surprised if you can still find the individual pieces on sale, that kit might be as cheap as you do. Iíd buy it, I think thatís a fair price. As far as batteries go, a buncha the mower brands are apparently compatible but with different clips and extra rails to dissuade inter-use. Those can be modified if itís one of the same 80v mowers, or you can keep an eye out for sales. One battery between all three of those should last a few years, but it would be great to have a second one.

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



I'm having trouble figuring out how much money I'd be saving, because it looks like the individual pieces that you can buy come with a battery too. I would definitely want another battery, just so I wouldn't have to wait for one to charge if I ever wanted to use all three.

I also have a corded blower which does an amazing job, so it's not as enticing to me.

mcgreenvegtables
Nov 2, 2004
Yum!

OSU_Matthew posted:

I just bought into the Kobalt mower ecosystem a few months ago when I snapped one up the end of season clearance. 250 for the push mower (the kit one is self propelled), and recently 115 for the blower and 2AH battery. Iíve already got a Makita trimmer otherwise I woulda bought one as well.

I freaking love both the mower and blower. Both worked even on piles of wet leaves. The blower does churn through battery on turbo mode pretty fast, but itís enough for my postage stamp lot. The mower handles tall grass, mulches leaves, and was able to do my lot 3 times on a single charge. I donít need the self propelled version of it, and Iím extremely happy with the ergonomics and fold ability of the mower.

Iíd be surprised if you can still find the individual pieces on sale, that kit might be as cheap as you do. Iíd buy it, I think thatís a fair price. As far as batteries go, a buncha the mower brands are apparently compatible but with different clips and extra rails to dissuade inter-use. Those can be modified if itís one of the same 80v mowers, or you can keep an eye out for sales. One battery between all three of those should last a few years, but it would be great to have a second one.

Looks like the push mower is on screaming sale too, with battery for $199.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-80-volt-Max-Brushless-Lithium-Ion-Push-21-in-Cordless-Electric-Lawn-Mower/1000698036
Per conversation earlier in this thread I am tempted to jump on this to replace my Ryobi 40v.

EDIT: No store pickup and shipping is $65. Still tempted. Whenever my 40v battery fails I am out $150 anyway and will need to mow whether or not the Kobalt is on sale.

mcgreenvegtables fucked around with this message at 20:39 on Nov 1, 2020

Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



mcgreenvegtables posted:

Looks like the push mower is on screaming sale too, with battery for $199.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-80-volt-Max-Brushless-Lithium-Ion-Push-21-in-Cordless-Electric-Lawn-Mower/1000698036
Per conversation earlier in this thread I am tempted to jump on this to replace my Ryobi 40v.

EDIT: No store pickup and shipping is $65. Still tempted. Whenever my 40v battery fails I am out $150 anyway and will need to mow whether or not the Kobalt is on sale.

How long have you had the 40v mower for? The 80v mower seems to be a pretty solid mower for the price.

I'd jump on that $200 deal, but it's sold out in my area and no shipping options are available.

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Bioshuffle
Feb 10, 2011

No good deed goes unpunished



Speaking of mowers, what is the general release schedule for next model of lawn mowers? If I want to hold out to see if the next generation offers marked improvement, when do they start releasing them? I'm specifically looking at the Honda HRN models.

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